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Heated water hoses - are they worth it?


Chalkie
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I tried searching for this topic and came up with lots of results not exactly this.

So, are they worth it or not? They are a lot of money for something that may or may not be needed, but since this winter is getting bizarre in terms of temps for where we are, I am wondering what others think. Thanks!! 

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Personally, I do not feel the heated hoses are worth the cost of effort.  The hose does not protect the faucet or water source.  If on the rare occasion that we experience weather that can freeze the hose, I fill my fresh water tank and disconnect the hose and drain it.  I also close the gray tank and make sure I clear the sewer hose.  Water filters go in the basement for a couple of nights.  If I need more water or drain my tanks, I can get the hoses hooked up again.

Ken

 

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As a full-timer who may spend a week or two well below freezing it is totally worth it.  I've done both - made my own out of Pex and heat tape and purchased a pre-made hose.

Not having to go out every day or two in the below freezing to hook up and fill the tank is worth the cost.

Once we get south or it warms up I'll roll it up and save for next time.

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I bought one fall 2019 and so glad - for me it's much easier and takes away the 'what if'.   I use the split roll of insulation you can get at Home Depot or elsewhere and cut it to cover the faucet and city water inlet.  Used it here in Nevada at 17* last winter and in AZ in the teens last Spring.  This winter has been warmer and I may not have needed it, but I'll take that chance.  For me, better safe than sorry and nothing to fiddle with.  I leave it hooked up until we're past the possibility of freeze and then pack it away for next time.

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This post is for information only as I have seen folks do some dangerous things. So no recommend to do it at all. Just what worked for us.I It lasted the whole time we full timed, seven years.

I did this in 1998 using the right length of hose for our winter quarters that still got down to the teens in Jan-Feb in NW Louisiana. I made the hose to length with brass fittings, and cut strips of aluminum 2" tape to put on lengthwise as it took two lengths one on each side to overlap as I wanted. Then I taped the heat tape (Which is actually more of a cable than tape) to the now aluminum clad hose. Then I covered it in pipe insulation leaving the thermostat side exposed to turn on and off at the right temps. See pics below I took while making and using it.

I clad the hose in aluminum tape for two reasons. One was to not damage the hose with the heat all in one place on the hose. And two to distribute the heat around the hose to heat the hose and water more evenly/effectively. It worked. When we built our RV space I put the water spigot 12" deep in a piece of PVC pipe such that I could stuff foam in it too. It worked perfectly despite all the horror stories folks told about heat tape causing damage and fires. The only change I made to mine was to replace the plastic ends with brass.

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Hope that helps, although there are many ways to skin a cat.

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I've stayed in parks that insulate the faucet and pipe on site so as to be usable all winter. That let me just hook up my hose to fill my tank then drain the hose and store it until needed again. Not many parks in the northland stay open so those that do find ways to supply what their customers need. And that's a good place to learn what YOU need.

Linda

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2 hours ago, Pat & Pete said:

Next thing is your park will be looking to lighten your wallet more because they helped you save all that heated hose money . LOL

ROFL

5 minutes ago, ms60ocb said:

I have been in parks that want you leave a faucet to drtp. Your choice whether you leave your grey tank open.  The faucets where not protected.

Clay

They do not want you to drip the faucets. They have their own private well and water treatment plant and they have a limited amount of water in a tank (about 8000 gallons) and do not want the entire park (about 100 sites) to drain that tank. Again, their park, their rules.

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10 minutes ago, Kirk W said:

They probably have frost free, drain back hydrants. They are fine as long as the valve has been closed. 

They do. This is a veteran owned and managed park and they have invested a lot into upgrading the infrastructure of the park. I appreciate the way they manage and the personal touch they bring to everyday interactions. I can certainly live with their rules when the weather is so darned weird.

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Park where we are has told us to drip faucets and protect their outside hose faucets.  Even went to far as to suggest that WE buy a heat strip and wrap THEIR faucet and plug it into electricity that WE have to pay for.  The city is telling people to NOT drip faucets as the water pressure will drop too low in the system and then they will have to issue a boil water order.

Our normal procedure is to fill the fresh water tank, disconnect and put the water regulator water filters in the basement to prevent freezing.  So what do we do to handle this?  The parks water supply is a plastic pipe about 2 feet long attached to a 4" x 4" post.  

Ken

 

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7 hours ago, packnrat said:

worth it or not?

ask a lot of people in texas right now.

Wouldn't matter to me as the park I am in (in Texas) doesn't want their taps left on, and now as long as the subfreezing temps have hung around they have shut their water treatment plant down. 

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Several cities around us have ask people to NOT drip faucets as it will cause the water pressure to drop to low levels and then they are forced to issue a Boil Water notice.  Well it happened, they have all issued boil water notices.  With the power off and so many running out of propane, how are they to boil water now?  

We are still operating off of our fresh water tank for now.  

Ken

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1 minute ago, TXiceman said:

Several cities around us have ask people to NOT drip faucets as it will cause the water pressure to drop to low levels and then they are forced to issue a Boil Water notice. 

Where our daughter lives they sent messages to residents telling them to drip faucets, and just as you stated they were then forced to send out messages saying to boil water. Now they have no water at all unless the city can "import" water from neighboring cities. The mismanagement at state and local levels for this weather emergency is appalling.  

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