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jules2go

Winter camping checklist

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I'm putting together a winter camping checklist (after having winterized the camper and packed the necessary clothing, bedding, and food) and need tips from experienced people. This will be my first year of camping in my trailer in the winter, and I've only had it since May 2020. I'm heading back out this weekend and the temps will be 28-32 for several hours on a couple of the nights. I doubt that I'll be out there if it's much lower than 25 at night, and I live in the southern part of Appalachia if that helps. TIA. 

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My experience has found if the nighttime lows do not go below 27° and daytime highs reach 50° in an unheated  TT the plumbing will not freeze. The residual daytime heat in the TT ie enough to keep the plumbing from freezing.

In a heated TT the plumbing is even more safe. The only concern will be if you leave your water hose out at night. Of course that is why a TT is self-contained, you may fill your water tank, drain and store your hose until your water tank is empty then refill as necessary.

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That sounds about right. 

In every "unheated" trailer at 25 degrees I froze up, unless I continually go up through the night and ran water through the facets. 

I disconnect the water line if it goes below freezing. 

 

Edited by Vladimir

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If you plan to have little to no heat, wear a stocking cap to bed. It's amazing how effective a chimney your head is when it comes to heat rising.

Linda Sand

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I assume that you will be in your 2020 NuCamp trailer for the trip? If so it looks like the kitchen is only accessible when outdoors so probably is not heated? If correct I see now why you are winterizing. It looks like a trailer that I would have really enjoyed in my younger days, but not so much today. It reminds me a bit of the days when I used to hunt in the WY mountains from a teepee with the kitchen outdoors and under a fly. I'm afraid that I probably can't help you  much but because it has been too long since I did any camping that way. I'd be very interested to hear about the trip once you return!

I-05-1024x576.jpg

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Oh yes, I almost forgot.  I spent a winter trapping from a log cabin in the mountains in Maine.  Heated with a wood stove.  No running water.  Outhouse.  Wear layers.  Wear light layers that you can peel off or add to.  The innermost layer should be one that wicks sweat away from you.  And wool will still keep you warm when wet.

These days the only snow I see is on TV or in friends' email/texts.  They had three feet in Saskatoon this week.

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8 hours ago, Jinx & Wayne said:

If you are not dry camping a good electric blanket is very nice to have.

If  you are, a mattress heater uses very little power.

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Thank you everyone! My tt is the Nucamp Tab 320S (kitchen inside). It has propane (or electric) heat via an Alde system which works great (so far anyway!). I have solar, will be dry camping so no hoses to deal with. I forgot to mention all of that in my OP, sorry.

Looking at the forecast again I think I'll be ok not to winterize for this trip as it will only be below freezing for a few hours one of the nights and then up well above freezing the rest of the time. My climate in western NC def gets cold, but as the planet is warming, it has been less so. Last winter I don't think we had any snow to speak of. It would be so nice not to have to winterize very often, but I did buy several gallons of pink stuff, along with 10 bags of pinon logs from NM that I was THRILLED to have found at Lowes!! 

 

 

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1 hour ago, jules2go said:

It has propane (or electric) heat via an Alde system which works great (so far anyway!).

The Alde system is new to me, so I'm going to have to do some reading and research. It sure looks impressive so please do keep us updated on how it works out for you. Things like comfort and fuel consumption or electrical requirements would be of great interest. I look forward to hearing how it works out for you. 

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I'm back from my little excursion, was warm at night, no issues. Everything worked as it should. One thing I thought about was how much propane might be left in my tank. Is there a gauge available to help with this and/or what does everyone do? If I were to be out on an extended trip I'd probably bring a second tank with me. 

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During cool weather the best "gauge" is a cup of warm water slowly poured down the side of the LP tank. A frost line will quickly form at the LP liquid level.

Small indicator strips are sold at virtually all RV supply stores that use the same thermodynamic theory. Their downside is if you exchange tanks you lose the indicator strip.

The inline pressure gauge is of no use, as there is always the same pressure in the tank until it is nearly empty.

Edited by Ray,IN

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1 hour ago, Ray,IN said:

During cool weather the best "gauge" is a cup of warm water slowly poured down the side of the LP tank. A frost line will quickly form at the LP liquid level.

X2

Linda Sand

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8 hours ago, jules2go said:

 Is there a gauge available to help with this and/or what does everyone do? 

I personally like and use this.  It is very handy and can be used on any propane tank to check the level of liquid inside.

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Thank you for these ideas for propane tank evaluation. Switching out a tank in the middle of a cold night is not something I'm looking forward to doing, so I'll have to get a plan. 

Edited by jules2go

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On 11/20/2020 at 10:29 PM, whj469 said:

Go to South Florida during the winter! That is how I winterize.

That is the way to do it, for sure!! 

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I had Mopeka sensors 2-1/2 years ago.  The sensor units were so large that the would get crushed under the tanks unless you were very careful putting them in the racks.  I had two 40# with a filled weight over 75# and a waist level tank drawer.  Careful was not always in the cards and they died after a couple of fills. Maybe there is a new, smaller sensor. I'm using Chad's Truma sensor and like it.  It is the size of roll of large coins.  It is cheaper than Mopeka, too.

2 hours ago, soos said:

We have the Mopeka sensors for ALL our propane tanks.

 

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