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Wintering the truck suggestion?

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Other than plugging in the block heater and 4amp trickle charger for the batteries, what else should I do for the truck that's setting the winter in the driveway?

Fuel tanks are 3/4 full.

On my international, I added some anti-gel stuff to the fuel... plugged in the block heater and let it set for the winter. I'd start it every week or so and let it idle.

Right now it's 19 degrees with a 8-20 mph wind. Chill factor is... friggen' cold.

Bob who is cold

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Don't bother with the block heater until a few hours before starting.  Your electric bill will thank you.

Don't start the engine unless you're going to drive it a good bit, say 10-20 miles.

 

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Big power bill from leaving the block heater powered, unless you plan on travelling. Pull the battery cables, make sure your coolant is up to snuff, walk away.

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if you are going to drive the truck when its cold (say below 10 degrees) then get some blended fuel or #1 fuel in the tanks and run through the fuel system (don't need to be full; but enough to not gel during your target temps)

don't bother with anti gel bottles; you will end up with bigger issues in the long run (reduction of lubricity, as example); #1 or blended fuel is a way better option

If you are not going to drive the truck when its cold then don't bother with the fuel and don't start it; leaving it sit over winter doesn't hurt a thing (cold starts are way more damaging then no start; especially when its cold).  I'm not following the start and let idle concept;  all that does is add unburnt fuel to your engine oil.  Without getting to operating temp your oil is getting more and more polluted and not evaporating anything out.

a block heater plugged in just because has zero value; 4 hours before startup is plenty

best option for the batteries is to top them off then disconnect; if that isn't possible then trickle charger

 

I'm up in ND; it gets crazy cold here (-40F without wind chill); the majority of our heavy equipment doesn't get run over the winters.  Cold startups is hard on equipment, minimize them.  My HDT would sit from Oct through May every year, fresh oil change and batteries on a trickle charger; #2 fuel in the tanks, didn't have a single startup issue.

Edited by steiny93

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We always filled the diesel tanks and kept the batteries charged.  Our farm equipment usually started and ran fine the next year.  If the oil has a lot of miles or hours we changed that before winter.  Starting the engine just to start it is hard on it.  Just leave it be.  As others said don't plug in the heater.

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When it gets a bone chilling 66° Fahrenheit in Central Florida, we start the truck and we have a 32 mile loop down past the phosphate mines.

Gives the truck a chance to shake off the dust and burn off some cobwebs. Oh and puts a smile on my face.

🤓

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1 minute ago, Parrformance said:

When it gets a bone chilling 66° Fahrenheit in Central Florida,....

🤓

Ya, we'll see 66 about March. 

Thanks 😊 

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1 hour ago, Parrformance said:

we start the truck and we have a 32 mile loop down past the phosphate mines.

We've heard about folks who hang out around the phosphate mines...........:-O

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I always shut off the disconnects in summer and winter in Mi. Even if I plugged in the block heater and started it wouldn't probably reach 100 degrees in 40-50 degree weather. Would do more harm than good. I do get the urge in spring to start and hear the big kitty purr.

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Throw some blended fuel in it and call it good. I drive mine a couple times through the winter. Don't go anywhere special just a Sunday drive to keep everything working.

You dont need to plug it in unless you are going to start it. Even then I plug it in a few hours ahead of when I want to go.

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Top off the fuel tanks to help prevent condensation.

Plug in the battery tender

Put her away with a fresh oil change. less acids and carbon in the oil.

Do not keep the block heater plugged in. Its actually bad for it. The cold block will retain a film of oil better then a warm block will. If the engine block is kept warm it should be started often. With our generators Cat and Cummins both say to run a warm engine ATLEAST once a week for 20 minutes. They say if its going to be stored and not run often its best to let it be cold.

I start mine maybe twice a winter just to let it build air and warm up. But its not really necessary.

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Thanks folks...I'm going to keep it simple. As it should be apparently.

Guess you don't need to keep the fridge running when it's....22* outside. Doh.

Burrrr Bob

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I add Howe’s or Power Service anti gel to mine. Never know if I might need to move it for whatever reason, and much simpler if something does come up. Don’t trust modern #2 diesel below 20F.

Other than that, battery tender or pull the cables off. It will be fine come spring.

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Bob, I know this "probably" is poor advice but its the same as when I see someone how to winterize their trailer......

"Go south" !!

To "winterize",  here on the south coast, the most we usually do is fold up the lawn chairs. 

Stay warm.

Edited by Big5er

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Agree totally. We were planning on a touch-n-go at the house, but other things are keeping us 'chillin' for a few months. And I started the truck bed build. Which, for me, is way fun.

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On 10/29/2020 at 7:12 AM, Brad & Jacolyn said:

At the risk of being considered a wise guy we have lots of room in the RGV. Lots of warm weather. Bring your golf clubs.

 

Go have some ribs for us at Rudy's.... we're stuck up north this winter....

4 hours ago, Big5er said:

Bob, I know this "probably" is poor advice but its the same as when I see someone how to winterize their trailer......

"Go south" !!

To "winterize",  here on the south coast, the most we usually do is fold up the lawn chairs. 

Stay warm.

Gotta do something to keep all those pine needles out of the chairs....

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