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GlennWest

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Glen,

Sympathy.

With that big of an air leak you and/or your wife should be able to hear it.  Pump it up to 120 and shut off the truck, pop the hood and listen closely near the fan (many HDT's have an air actuated fan clutch).  If no good, listen near the firewall (often times lots of airline connections there).  Next leveling valve in the rear that controls the air to the rear air bags. Then check near the air dryer.

There's a device can often be helpful in finding the leak location.  Maybe a HDT owner near you has one that you could borrow.

https://www.amazon.com/INFICON-711-202-G1-Whisper-Ultrasonic-Detector/dp/B000TRJA8M

Good Luck!

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I've put Schrader valves in lots of places on trucks.  Often the easiest is in the air governor itself.  Just remove one of the plugs and screw in the governor.  Of course, this means standing there holding an air chuck forever..........

Or, install a female quick disconnect at one of the air tanks, or some other easy to reach spot.  Then make up a male/male adapter so you can plug directly to the air hose from shop air.  Keep said adapter in your air line repair kit. You do have one......?

Or, since you have glad hands on the truck, put a female quick connect to a glad hand and put it on the red side.  Attach with above mentioned adapter.  You'll have to hold in the red brake knob until you have some pressure in the truck. 

All the above ideas can allow some moisture to enter the system.  Well, this is real life, and with reasonable care, only a drop or two might sneak by.  I've been using air brakes since I was 14 y/o and have only once had brakes freeze, on a used trailer.

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I have my set up plumbed directly into the wet tank.  I keep it connected to shop air whenever parked.  This way, I am not worried about a little moisture coming in from the shop compressor.  It keeps the whole truck aired up and there were several unused bungs on the wet tank which made the connection easy.  I used a bit of extra air line and ran the connection up to the back of the cab near the top of the flat bed.  It makes connecting to the air hose very easy.

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Red glad hand is trailer supply. But air will flow both ways.  Connect fittings as I described above and push in red knob.  When tanks are up to around 40ish pounds of pressure, knob will stay in.

But now you got me thinking.... Do you know the leak is in the truck and not the trailer?

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On 8/28/2020 at 6:25 AM, rickeieio said:

Red glad hand is trailer supply. But air will flow both ways.  Connect fittings as I described above and push in red knob.  When tanks are up to around 40ish pounds of pressure, knob will stay in.

But now you got me thinking.... Do you know the leak is in the truck and not the trailer?

 

Edited by GlennWest

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If you carry a small portable air compressor(instead of the suggested shop air) you can make up  the male to male hose as mentioned above and fill the entire system.  I have recently replaced my 20+ YO Emglo compressor with a Harbor Freight Fortress Ultra Quiet ( not a big fan of these tools from HF generally, but they have upped their game) and use it in my business.  It will travel with me in the truck for situations like this.

Once you have the system aired up, and I dont imagine you need FULL air pressure, you can listen for leaks to get you close to the area, then if you dont have a Whisper, you can use kids bubbles or a soap solution and find the offending leak.  Keep in mind that where there is one, they will likely be others, so if you end up buying parts to fix THAT ONE, get parts to fix many and keep in your truck kit. 

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Are you building air with the truck compressor, or a separate source?  If the leak is in the engine bay, it's be hard to detect with the engine running.  I'm not familiar with Freightliner, but on our Volvo, we had a big leak in one of the fittings in the firewall pass through.  It was so loud the Whisper was overpowered by it, but I could feel it when I put my fingers in the bundle of lines.  All it took to repair was an o-ring and 3 minutes work.

It's possible the governor is the problem.......

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Popular belief is that compressed bags somehow deteriorate faster.  I doubt it.  They have an internal "stop" that prevents them from collapsing all the way.  Same way with main suspension bags.  My trucks sit for months with no air, all bags collapsed.  Mack is a 2000 model, just replaced the bags a couple years ago.  Volvo is an '01 and changed out original cab bags in 2015.  Did the suspension bags in 2014 because one had rusted through on the top plate.  Rubber was still fine.

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Are you buying good quality bags?  I can't imagine them not lasting a long time unless they were old when you got them, or quality was suspect.  Do you park so sun is hitting them?  From your sig pic, it looks like they're exposed.

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