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Use the search function on this and other forums (and on Google) and do a lot of reading. In my opinion, it boils down to available space versus functionality. Here are some of the trade-offs:

Combo washer/dryer (single unit), nonvented: smallest drum (smallest loads), takes the longest to complete a cycle (especially nonvented), and you can't start the next load of wash while the previous one is drying.

Separate washer/dryer: take the most space (which you may not have in a class C), but have the larger drum capacities. Can dry one load while another is washing. A separate, vented dryer dries clothing the fastest.

Fresh water and gray tank capacity doesn't really matter if you're in a site with hookups.

Personally, our tolerance for laundromats during the pandemic is zero. We used to use them all the time but installed a washer and dryer when the pandemic hit.

Rob

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10 minutes ago, Second Chance said:

Combo washer/dryer (single unit), nonvented: smallest drum (smallest loads), takes the longest to complete a cycle (especially nonvented), and you can't start the next load of wash while the previous one is drying.

People continually act as if having separate washers and dryers makes for a big improvement in how long it takes to do a couple of loads of wash.  In fact, having separate units results in a ~one hour reduction in the length of time it takes to do two loads of wash (out of a six hour wash/dry cycle.)

If you have two loads to wash, having separate units means that the second wash can get started when the first wash is finished.  For argument sake, let's assume washes take one hour and dry cycles take two hours.  So at the end of the first hour the first load of clothes goes into the dryer and the second load of clothes goes into the washer.    At the end of the second hour the second load of clothes has finished washing but the first load is still drying.  At the end of the third hour the first load of wash will have finished drying and the second load can then be dried for two more hours.  Total elapsed time 5 hours.

With a combo the total elapsed time would be roughly 2 times the 3 hour wash/dry cycle = 6 hours.  For us that one hour saving wouldn't balance out the loss of the huge storage pantry we have in the space above the combo.  Yes, we could fit separate units in the space but we wouldn't want to lose the storage.  Furthermore, we typically wash single loads when we have them and rarely have two loads of clothes to wash at one time.  For us, the beauty of having our own washer/dryer is that we don't have to accumulate  dirty clothes to wash. JMO

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If you are looking at adding an washer/dryer to a class C that you already own, then this may be the only option, but if you are still shopping for an RV, they why not look at class A rigs as well? I have driven both and find the class A less difficult, once you get by the mental feeling of size and the cost is not significantly different. 

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I have a Splendide 2100XC and have been using it full time for 10 years.  My rig has a hamper built in that I use for white items and I use the Splendide for colors.  Since colors for me build up faster than whites when I have a load in the Splendide I run it.  Then run the whites when I have a load.

Easy.

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16 hours ago, docj said:

People continually act as if having separate washers and dryers makes for a big improvement in how long it takes to do a couple of loads of wash.  In fact, having separate units results in a ~one hour reduction in the length of time it takes to do two loads of wash (out of a six hour wash/dry cycle.)

. JMO

What is the magic of taking less time to wash and dry.  We are retired and have all the time we need to waste.

But with the combo unit, we can put in a load of dry and dirty laundry and take off ...come back later and the load is dry and clean.  No one has to be around to swap from the washer to the drier.

Ken

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docj, my washer takes between 15 min to 1 1/2 hours to wash depending on what I set it at. I usually use 55 min. My dryer takes about 1 hour. When the wash is done I put it in the dryer. An hour later it is dry.
Sometimes I start a second wash. When the second wash is done the first load in the dryer is done and I put the second load of wash in the dryer. A hour later the second load is dry. So it takes me only 3 hours total to do two loads. Not 5 or 6 hours. I highly recommend the stackable units over the combo unit.

The only advantage of the combo unit is if you start a load and leave for the day it will be dry when you get back. No one has to be there to transfer the wash to the dryer. But that only works for one load. I usually start a load at dinner time. By the time I am done eating I can start a second load. Before I go to bed I put the second load in the dryer and fold the first load that is now dry. When I wake up in the morning the second load is dry and gets folded. 

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10 hours ago, GlennWest said:

If you can fit a stacked unit , I would use a waher/gas dryer combo. It will dry clothes faster and if you end up on solar, less power to operate. 

I'm surprised there aren't more gas dryers in RVs.  Not only for boondocking but because a gas dryer has 10-15 times more heat than a 120 volt electric dryer so it dries clothes much faster.

A gas dryer uses about 22,000 btu or 1/4 gallon of propane per hour of drying time and dries full loads in 30 - 45 minutes.  About the same amount of propane as running an RV furnace for the same amount of time.

Meanwhile, it's only using enough electricity to spin the drum and blow the hot air through the clothes. Maybe 100 watts.

Edited by Lou Schneider
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5 hours ago, Twotoes said:

docj, my washer takes between 15 min to 1 1/2 hours to wash depending on what I set it at. I usually use 55 min. My dryer takes about 1 hour. When the wash is done I put it in the dryer. An hour later it is dry.

You can barely dry a load of clothes in an hour with a 240V residential dryer,  let alone one in an RV running on 120V.  Is your dryer propane fired?  Or do you have it wired for 240V?

Edited by docj
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28 minutes ago, docj said:

You can barely dry a load of clothes in an hour with a 240V residential dryer,  let alone one in an RV running on 120V.  Is your dryer propane fired?  Or do you have it wired for 240V?

A residential dryer holds a lot more clothes also. So drying time would be similar. Since we got the front loader washer with the high speed spin out, our drying times are way down. Clothes are not as wet.

Edited by GlennWest
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docj, I have an all electric Class A. No propane at all. My dryer is done in about an hour. It is a small load so that may be why it is so quick. I set my washer to 50 min and the drying of the first load is done  just after the washer and the wet clothes (second wash load) goes right into the dryer. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

I just had an experience with our Splendide 2100XC.  Despite the Surge Guard, an electrical storm whacked it.  The Splendide techs walked me through troubleshooting,even sending an email illustration.  Found the problem and they sent the part the next day.  I am pleased with that result, and DW is happy, too!

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