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How are you mounting your 5th wheel hitch?


trimster
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trimster   Hitch to a plate (at least 1/2"bolted). Plate to the frame using existing bolt holes (grade 8 bolts in both places)I know it won't be quite that simple but that should give you a place to start.Unless you have the capability to drill holes in a steel plate so it will line up with the holes in the frame you may want to look around to find someone with a mag base drill who will help. Where are you located? It's very doable You just nee to find the right help.   Pat 

 

 

The Old Sailor

 

 

 

 

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Depends on which Hitch you plan to use. The ET Hitch comes complete with all needed except mounting bolts. Slide in from rear, set height, level, drill holes. I had holes in chassis so drilled holes in Hitch angle iron. It not hardened, rails are. The Comfort Ride pictured, I understand you buy your own angle iron and steel plate. Either is a good Hitch bit ET is easier. Oh, add an air line for ET. That is simple.

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I slid the factory 5th wheel mounting brackets back to where the frame angles off. This required some drilling. Then I mounted a 3/4 inch plate to that. Then just bolted the Comfort Ride down to that. My old camper rode a little nose high. My new one has plenty of adjustment to get it level.

 

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Just now, GlennWest said:

It is. As I stated earlier I didn't drill in frame. Was factory holes and used them. Lots of extra holes in chassis rails. Use them if you can. Much eadiler to drill regular steel to match 

I had to drill 3 holes in frame and ream out one to get the rails to bolt up.

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36 minutes ago, trimster said:

By the looks of that drill setup, the frame must be hard steel.

You can drill it with a regular drill but a mag drill with cutting bit is faster. I was talking to one guy who said he drilled a small hole then used a bridge reamer to get the right size. No matter what drill you have a bridge reamer is very handy tool to have when doing this project. I got a 1/2 9/16 and 3/4.

https://www.amazon.com/Drill-America-Qualtech-High-Speed-Uncoated/dp/B00FXJGSLI/ref=asc_df_B00FXJGSLI/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=312440347105&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=2736057981198873765&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9024548&hvtargid=pla-569921301568&psc=1

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1 minute ago, jenandjon said:

You can drill it with a regular drill but a mag drill with cutting bit is faster. I was talking to one guy who said he drilled a small hole then used a bridge reamer to get the right size. No matter what drill you have a bridge reamer is very handy tool to have when doing this project. I got a 1/2 9/16 and 3/4.

https://www.amazon.com/Drill-America-Qualtech-High-Speed-Uncoated/dp/B00FXJGSLI/ref=asc_df_B00FXJGSLI/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=312440347105&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=2736057981198873765&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9024548&hvtargid=pla-569921301568&psc=1

2X on the bridge reamer. That's how I did my holes. Go slow and use a cutting fluid to help keep the reamer cool.

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1 minute ago, trimster said:

That's a serious bit of bit there. Thanks. Getting one.

Depending on the hardware used get an oversize one. An ET uses 3/4 inch mounting bolts, you need 13/16 (clearance)  bit for those. Also, ET angles are pre-drilled for 3/4 inch bolt mounting (3 on each side), but I would go with suggestions of others, if you have a factory drilled (spare) hole in the frame, use those and drill a new hole in the (soft steel) angle, it's not critical to strictly "obey" the pre-drilled bolt locations.

Using a mag drill is the ultimate, but there are specific "techniques" for using it on hardened rails, or the steel will seize (or break) the bit and there are locations where you just can't get drill in and have a good magnetic grip.

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Glenn, we use bull pins or drift pins to align bolt holes in structural steel. Reamers are a last resort as your bolt values drop when used in an oversized hole for N or X bearing bolts. If the bolts are SC (slip critical) and you have a good faying surface, minor reaming is allowed with the approval of the EOR.

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On 2/28/2020 at 7:40 PM, JPL said:

trimster   Hitch to a plate (at least 1/2"bolted). Plate to the frame using existing bolt holes (grade 8 bolts in both places)I know it won't be quite that simple but that should give you a place to start.Unless you have the capability to drill holes in a steel plate so it will line up with the holes in the frame you may want to look around to find someone with a mag base drill who will help. Where are you located? It's very doable You just nee to find the right help.   Pat 

 

 

The Old Sailor

Same here, hitch mounted on 1/2" steel plate mounted on frame. Plate supplier drilled holes to match frame and hitch mount per my specs.

 

 

 

 

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