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Induction burner cookware


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I shopped my pots and pans at Olly's and other overstock stores. I have a small magnet on my key ring. Really, it is not that much trouble. But that seems a nice set. I would expect it to be some light weight stuff based on the price for so many pans. I have one skillet and one saucepan and a kettle  that I use regularly. A few others sit and gather dust.

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With all due respect, these days most cookware is marked as to its ability to work with induction--no magnet required.  There's no particular reason to use the link the OP provided; there are lots of alternatives. 

FWIW if you want cookware you can pass along to the next generation, I suggest you purchase AllClad.  It's very pricey but it will last forever and it's even US made.

Edited by docj
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15 hours ago, sandsys said:

If it works well, why pay more?

Most induction burners have an "active area" that is only about 4" in diameter.  When you use pots larger in diameter than the active area it's important that they conduct heat well enough to minimize any temperature differential from the center to the outer edge.  Most better stainless steel cookware usually has a layer of copper or aluminum sandwiched between layers of steel to aid with heat distribution.    I know that some people like to use cast iron with induction burners but I would think that could result in significant center to edge temperature differences.

AllClad has been a leader in bonded layer cookware; there are quite a few others available these days.  I'm not justifying what AllClad charges.  I'm only saying the their cookware cooks very well and lasts forever.

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I did look at AllClad. Way above my income. Shopping at Olly's I have found the better grade of stainless Farberware and KitchenAid at an attractive price, inductive tested with my magnet. I bought a Cuisnart non-stick even though it failed the magnet. It is used on my butane stove. It is the best non-stick I have ever used.

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20 hours ago, docj said:

Most better stainless steel cookware usually has a layer of copper or aluminum sandwiched between layers of steel to aid with heat distribution.   

From the link I posted, "Designed for quick and even heat distribution, the impact-bonded tri-ply base (THE BOTTOM) consists of (CONSTRUCTED WITH) 18/10 stainless steel, an aluminum core, and magnetic STAINLESS STEEL "

Linda Sand

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  • 1 year later...

I don't know if carrying a small magnet is the best way to go around it lol. I think they have these cookware labelled as 'induction compatible' or 'induction ready'. That makes it easier to differentiate. The best bet for all RV cooking according me are those non-stick variants (i like the ones they've picked here) that still work with an induction cooktop. 

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1 hour ago, noteven said:

I’m planning a single energy source camper build - likely electricity - 

What do I need to know about induction cookin?

Induction cooking is fast and clean but you need pans that respond to magnets. I like that the burner itself never gets hot so you don't have to worry about it when not actually cooking. You can't sit anything on a standard electric stove even a few minutes after it's turned off without melting/burning it. Our downstairs neighbor caused a fire by setting a cardboard box on a smooth top electric stove that was supposedly off.

Linda Sand

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I bought a set of Cusinart at Bed Bath and Beyond. Can’t remember what I paid, about $100. It said right on the box induction compatible. Have used them 4 years now. Except for the frying pan they are all still in good condition. The frying pan needs to be replaced but that’s my fault for overcooking bacon several times. 

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If you are near an IKEA store, they label their cookware if it's induction compatible. Nice not having to haul a magnet around with you. As induction has become more popular it might be that more manufacturers are adding that to their labels. I haven't looked since 2011. :)

Linda

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All induction cookware will have this symbol, but we always carry a small magnet JIC. DW bought T-fal pots N pans for the MH and house.

 

 

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Edited by Ray,IN
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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/15/2021 at 11:29 AM, noteven said:

I’m planning a single energy source camper build - likely electricity - 

What do I need to know about induction cookin?

You need to know why you haven't really tried it before. 

In the 1990's I rented a house with an induction cook top. Of course I didn't have anything magnetic to cook with so I relied on my roommates stuff which was not all that good, or clean. Hated it. 

Fast forward to the 20teens and picking up a induction hot plate with money I could not otherwise use at a Camping World. Planned to give it away but started using it with my cast iron skillet and then some of my other apparently magnetic pans and I was sold. No excess heat caused by an open flame under the pans, instant control was still there like you would see with adjusting the flame. Sure you can't immediately see the change in flame, but the speed in which the increase or decrease occurs is just as fast. Not true with an electric resistance coil that takes forever to cool down and almost as long to heat up. You won't be disappointed, unless your inverter or off grid power supply isn't up to the task. My 3000 watt inverter should be find, except it's a modified sine wave and not a pure sine. The cook tops do not like that apparently. If I knew then what I know now, I would have had a totally electric home with a huge battery bank and the proper inverters. Trying to retrofit will be twice as expensive. It will be done, but not today. 

 

Rod  

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I've been using this Fagor set for 10 years.  My ex-wife bought it at Camping World for it's nesting qualities, it just also happens to be induction compatable.  Too bad it's no longer available, the stacked set stores nicely in the RV's oven and comes out as a single piece when I want to use the oven.  It works great with the induction hotplate I have now and the thick base creates even heat distribution on the gas stovetop.
http://popupbackpacker.com/camping/fagor-cookware/

 

Edited by Lou Schneider
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