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Volvo Radiator Drain Hose


SuiteSuccess
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Looks like a std Automotive coupler but you should be able to take a good pic and head to Northern tools or another store that carries different styles of quick connects. The fittings that I use (Milton V style) are supposed to connect to A (ARO) T (Automotive) and M (Industrial) fittings but I haven't tried them on everything.

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1 hour ago, GeorgiaHybrid said:

Looks like a std Automotive coupler but you should be able to take a good pic and head to Northern tools or another store that carries different styles of quick connects. The fittings that I use (Milton V style) are supposed to connect to A (ARO) T (Automotive) and M (Industrial) fittings but I haven't tried them on everything.

Dave,

Further research the connection on the bottom of the radiator is a ball valve so the quick connect would have to have a pin to hold that ball valve open. Are those available?

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52 minutes ago, Parrformance said:

Read the reviews on the Dorman one before you purchase.

Desert Miner, have you had good luck with this version?

Yeah reviews pretty bad on the Dorman. Interesting on some they have a male connect on the drain end of the tube.  They say to “properly “ replace the fluid.  So just pouring it in the reservoir is not good enough?  I know after filling you need to drive it and let it “burp”.  So they are filling from the bottom via a pressurized system?  Need to see if there’s a good YouTube on the procedure.

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55 minutes ago, Parrformance said:

OTR shows simply pouring it back in the top with three five gallon buckets.

Yep, saw that one but another I just watched shows how to fill using a vacuum. Tools expensive for one one time use, I doubt I’d be doing it again.  Shop wants $300 to just drain and put in new antifreeze.  Decisions, decisions. 

 

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1 hour ago, Parrformance said:

If the shop does do it, you would not ever need to do it again.  

True but the $300 was just to drain and replace.  If I’m gonna do it, I want to flush also which is labor intensive and would probably add another $300.  Still researching.  Thanks to everyone for the suggestions.

On edit, I can’t find the volume of coolant (ELC 50:50 mix) a Volvo d12 holds.  Any help?

Edited by SuiteSuccess
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22 minutes ago, Hewhoknowslittle said:

David,

You know this is what Carl was waiting for. You da man, man.

 

Can always count on my bro’.  👍. I’ve got so many projects to do before the ECR, I’m gonna be torn up and hobbling.  Hard on an old man to crawl around under these trucks.  Dave, may just make a March run down your way.  At least that way would have every tool known to man at my disposal.  Just too cold outside right now to work, so I’m still in hibernation.

Edited by SuiteSuccess
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13 hours ago, SuiteSuccess said:

Yep, saw that one but another I just watched shows how to fill using a vacuum. Tools expensive for one one time use, I doubt I’d be doing it again.  Shop wants $300 to just drain and put in new antifreeze.  Decisions, decisions. 

 

Great find, on the list of new tools to have. Thanks Suite.

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14 hours ago, SuiteSuccess said:

True but the $300 was just to drain and replace.  If I’m gonna do it, I want to flush also which is labor intensive and would probably add another $300.  Still researching.  Thanks to everyone for the suggestions.

On edit, I can’t find the volume of coolant (ELC 50:50 mix) a Volvo d12 holds.  Any help?

Hi Carl,

I have a few question for you. Is that cost to do the work from a mom and pop shop or the dealer ? When you said replace, are you talking about new antifreeze ? What do you think the cost of antifreeze alone would be ? You might want to think if you got hurt and had to go to the doctor's office, what would that cost ?

Just some things to think about,
Al

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1 hour ago, alan0043 said:

Hi Carl,

I have a few question for you. Is that cost to do the work from a mom and pop shop or the dealer ? When you said replace, are you talking about new antifreeze ? What do you think the cost of antifreeze alone would be ? You might want to think if you got hurt and had to go to the doctor's office, what would that cost ?

Just some things to think about,
Al

Al,

That cost is J&K Truck Repair in Crossville which has done a lot of work on my truck and provides what I consider good service.  Labor is $90 an hour with minimum billed time of 1 hr. to drain and refill.  Cost of extended life coolant is little over $17/gallon.  He estimated about 10 gals to refill.  Now if I wanted the flush that would add several more hours of labor time plus chemical flush so probably around another $300 for total of $600.  Been researching more and some people saying that flushing may in the long term create more problems by allowing "gunk" to deposit in the heater cores especially rear which we rarely use. If it was used regularly and circulaited daily then would be beneficial to flush to get all the gunk out. Thus may be better to just change in my case.  Interesting to note I have the coolant tested at each PM and so far has been good but on reading about it, suggestion is to change every 500,000 miles OR 5 years for extended life.  I'm at the 5 year mark since last change.  Also is really not hard to change with that hose I listed but there are multiple other plug sites that need to be drained also to get all the coolant out.  The video really shows the ideal way to refill with a vacuum because you not only check for leaks but also do not have air pockets that could be an issue.

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I can't speak to the drain hose. But I work on generators for data centers and telecom facilities. Recharging via the vacuum method is a godsend. It almost completely eliminates air pockets. We went from having to babysit and burp a particular set of generators for days. To be a one shot and done process, no air pockets no burping none of that hassle.

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I use my vacuum filler for every engine that gets any cooling system repair, water pump, thermostat, etc. Carl, one other thing that I just automatically do when changing out antifreeze is to replace the thermostat at the same time. Not much cost and a lot of piece of mind in that simple little gadget. You also need to inspect and replace any hoses that are showing signs of old age, separation in the linings, soft spots, etc.

Just let me know when you would like to come down and we can get it done.

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2 hours ago, GeorgiaHybrid said:

I use my vacuum filler for every engine that gets any cooling system repair, water pump, thermostat, etc. Carl, one other thing that I just automatically do when changing out antifreeze is to replace the thermostat at the same time. Not much cost and a lot of piece of mind in that simple little gadget. You also need to inspect and replace any hoses that are showing signs of old age, separation in the linings, soft spots, etc.

Just let me know when you would like to come down and we can get it done.

Yeah, I was looking at the thermostat access to see how hard.  Looking at March for a road trip.

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