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Getting my ducks in a row


Mstyrain
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Hi all, I'm new to the RV life and getting ready to head out summer of 2019. My two most pressing questions at this point are

1.) I intend to work on the road but have no kids along, I keep reading the term domicile in other topics, what is this and do I need to be concerned with it? If I don't live in a state for 6 months or more I understand that it affects my taxes.  I'm not sure what other considerations I need to take, such as which state my drivers license comes from or insurance.

2.) Has anyone out there had experience with using a flatbed truck to tow a travel trailer and then placing a Razr on the flatbed. I currently have an F250 with a truckbed camper and trailer the Razr, but I don't want to travel in the truck bed camper. I am thinking about converting the truck to a flatbed, but the Razr on the flatbed and tow a trailer. My big dilemma is that I want to be able to park the camper and day trip with the Razr so a toy hauler is not a great option. 

Any ideas and advice would be appreciated, I'm sure I will have a ton more questions as summer gets closer.

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33 minutes ago, Mstyrain said:

Hi all, I'm new to the RV life and getting ready to head out summer of 2019. My two most pressing questions at this point are

1.) I intend to work on the road but have no kids along, I keep reading the term domicile in other topics, what is this and do I need to be concerned with it? If I don't live in a state for 6 months or more I understand that it affects my taxes.  I'm not sure what other considerations I need to take, such as which state my drivers license comes from or insurance.

Yes, you need to be concerned about domicile.

Since you currently live in Colorado, that state is your domicile and will continue to be until you take steps to change to another state.  When you go fulltime, you will need an address for such things as driver's licenses, vehicle registration, voting, etc.  That address could be a friend or relative, if they're willing to take care of your mail and send it to you when you request it.  Or, like most fulltimers, you could use a mail forwarding address, such as those supplied by the Escapees.  I'm not sure that Colorado will accept a mail forwarding address for domicile purposes, though.  Plus, if you remain domiciled in Colorado, you will continue to pay Colorado's state income tax.

Florida, South Dakota, and Texas are popular states for fulltimers to claim as domiciles.  None of them require "X" amount of time in the state to claim it as a domicile, all have reasonable vehicle registration fees, none have a state income tax, and all accept a mail forwarding address as a domicile address (with some small differences among them).  There are other differences among these 3 states, so some research on your part will be necessary to determine which might be best for you...assuming you want to change from Colorado.

Here is a good place to start to learn about domicile...spend some time reading the several articles:

https://www.escapees.com/education/domicile/

Edited by LindaH
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Welcome to the Escapee forums! We are here to help so feel free to ask as many questions as you may have and also to join in on other conversations and threads.

4 hours ago, Mstyrain said:

1.) I intend to work on the road but have no kids along, I keep reading the term domicile in other topics, what is this and do I need to be concerned with it? If I don't live in a state for 6 months or more I understand that it affects my taxes.  I'm not sure what other considerations I need to take, such as which state my drivers license comes from or insurance.

Linda has given a pretty good answer, but I'll offer a few more thoughts. CO has a history of being more aggressive about enforcement of their laws related to vehicle registrations and such. Unless you plan to return to the state on a regular basis I strongly suggest that you make a choice of new domicile soon and begin actions to move there. You must have a legal address for your driving license, vehicle registrations, and for all forms of insurance that you may have. CO is not one of the states that allow the use of a mail forwarding service and if you do stay a CO resident you will also have to pay CO income tax, while none of the 3 states mentioned by Linda have an income tax. 

I recommend joining the Escapees RV Club as they are a complete support system for those of us who either live in an RV or travel for extended periods. As a club member you can use the best mail service there is, you can stay very inexpensively in any of the 18 RV parks associated with the club, they provide numerous learning resources and even hold rallies!

4 hours ago, Mstyrain said:

2.) Has anyone out there had experience with using a flatbed truck to tow a travel trailer and then placing a Razr on the flatbed. I currently have an F250 with a truckbed camper and trailer the Razr, but I don't want to travel in the truck bed camper. I am thinking about converting the truck to a flatbed, but the Razr on the flatbed and tow a trailer. My big dilemma is that I want to be able to park the camper and day trip with the Razr so a toy hauler is not a great option. 

The F250 should be plenty of truck to tow with and haul the Razr, so long as you don't get too large an RV to tow with it. You should familiarize yourself with weight limits and check the weight of everything you plan to take with you. I have a friend who does pretty much the same as you are considering and it works well for him. 

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On 1/30/2019 at 9:38 AM, Randyretired said:

 We carry a RZR 800 on the bed of our HDT and it it works fine.  A F250 could be overloaded with a RZR and a TT so it will be important to watch the capacity of the truck.

I'm not entirely sure what an HDT is:) I am wondering if I may ask how long your flatbed is and the length of your RZR 800. I'm curious if the 800 is shorter than a 900 of if yours looks like it is clinging to the edge of the flatbed like mine will. I have about 5 inches behind where the back tire stops touching the bed and the end of the bed. I'm looking at a relatively small TT and have plans to weigh the truck unloaded then loaded and subtract that weight difference from my tow capacity. People have shared some great articles on weight/length of safe towing.

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A HDT is  heavy duty truck.  Ours is a class 8 or what may be called a semi.  We have a RZR 800 which is 102" long.  We carry it across the bed as it is the maximum legal width in most places.  Our bed is bigger than many and we also carry a Subaru Forester at an angle over the top of the RZR with the roll bar removed.  We reside in Colorado where there are hundreds of miles of trails limited to 50" wide or less so the small RZR at 50" wide is what we need.  

Weighing your truck with the RZR is a good thing as it it easy to overload the rear axle or the maximum GCWR.  I also have an older F250 4x4 diesel and with the RZR, ramps and gas cans on it there isn't a lot of capacity remaining.  Touring around in an overloaded vehicle is not fun and of course not safe.  I have found that keeping below the maximum capacity makes driving easier and more enjoyable.  It may be necessary to step up to a 1 ton dually depending on the loaded weights.  We frequently boondock so we also carry extra supplies and water which adds more weight.  

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My RZR also ends right at the end of the bed but of course our HDT setup is different.  I thought I would share some of our setup to see if any of it might be useful to you.  At one side of the bed we installed 2 half circle stops that the front tires of the RZR fit into.  These have side braces and curve over the tires.  We bolted a ratchet to the bed even with the front of the RZR.  The strap from this ratchet hooks to a mount that the bolts holding the front axle pass through.  This mount was built by drilling a flat plate for the bolts to pass through and welding another piece of steel with a hole in it that is vertical and sticks down about an inch.  The hook on the end of a strap hooks through that and feeds into the ratchet.  I use a wrench to tighten it.  This pulls the RZR at an angle down and forward into the stops.  This secures the RZR from moving forward or backwards and secures the front.  Then we use 2  vertical ratchet straps crossed to secure the back.  This process is quick and very secure but to make sure the RZR stays there we have a chain welded to the bed and it is fastened to the RZR with a lock.

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