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NDBirdman
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I was going to post this as a reply in another thread but thought maybe it would offend one or 2 posters so I decided to start a new thread.

 

Semi truck or semi is short for semi-trailer truck. The prefix semi- literally means half. The term describes a truck consisting of a tractor and a semi-trailer. A semi-trailer is semi-supported (half supported) by its own wheels, which support only the rear of the trailer.

Calling a tractor, or HDT a semi has always irked me.  Everyone calling their HDT a semi(-trailer) I love to see how your (semi-)trailer is pulling a camper.  Most don't have engines, the ones that do are very small only driving a freezer unit.

OR, you could go with this definition from google:   SEMI means "Partial erection" So now you know - SEMI means "Partial erection" - don't thank us. YW! What does SEMI mean? SEMI is an acronym, abbreviation or slang word that is explained above where the SEMI definition is given

Come-on guys/gals, you either buy/drive a (road) tractor, or HDT, but no one drives a semi-trailer.  Pull one maybe, but not drive a trailer.  Sorry if anyone is offended, but I have been for a long time over miss-use of this phrase.  I'm a retired Truck Driver.  IF you want to continue using the term to make yourself feel big on the road, then say you pull a semi-trailer (camper), or operate a tractor-(semi)trailer(camper).  Again, not trying to offend anyone, but learn what you have.  Thank-you  (not meant for just the above poster, but eveyone that drives a..... semi).

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41 minutes ago, NDBirdman said:

I was going to post this as a reply in another thread but thought maybe it would offend one or 2 posters so I decided to start a new thread.

 

Semi truck or semi is short for semi-trailer truck. The prefix semi- literally means half. The term describes a truck consisting of a tractor and a semi-trailer. A semi-trailer is semi-supported (half supported) by its own wheels, which support only the rear of the trailer.

Calling a tractor, or HDT a semi has always irked me.  Everyone calling their HDT a semi(-trailer) I love to see how your (semi-)trailer is pulling a camper.  Most don't have engines, the ones that do are very small only driving a freezer unit.

OR, you could go with this definition from google:   SEMI means "Partial erection" So now you know - SEMI means "Partial erection" - don't thank us. YW! What does SEMI mean? SEMI is an acronym, abbreviation or slang word that is explained above where the SEMI definition is given

Come-on guys/gals, you either buy/drive a (road) tractor, or HDT, but no one drives a semi-trailer.  Pull one maybe, but not drive a trailer.  Sorry if anyone is offended, but I have been for a long time over miss-use of this phrase.  I'm a retired Truck Driver.  IF you want to continue using the term to make yourself feel big on the road, then say you pull a semi-trailer (camper), or operate a tractor-(semi)trailer(camper).  Again, not trying to offend anyone, but learn what you have.  Thank-you  (not meant for just the above poster, but eveyone that drives a..... semi).

As our HDT has a deck, it's not proper to refer to it as a "Tractor". It's a truck. Trucks can carry a load, while tractors are only traction units.

As to your Google definition, semi does not mean a partial erection, unless it's in reference to a "semi-erected" building. Semi means partial, or partly.

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I think you are flogging a dead horse if you think you will be able to change everyone to call them tractors instead of Semi's.  I to have been in the trucking industry for over 40 yrs and have heard them called Semi's many, many times.  
I googled up Semi Truck and a lot that came up was from truck dealers like KW, Penske used trucks and Arrow to mention a few.  So I think with most in the industry calling them Semi's you should be able to understand why people that's not in the industry to call them Semi's also.
But to each there own, if you think its up to you to change it, go for it.  I would bet against you.
Just this morning while walking around my boondocking site someone asked if that was my Semi and I just answered, why yes, yes it is.

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NDBirdman,

I used "semi", in a post earlier today, as a label to refer to my Volvo 770 HDT,  because I thought it would be more understandable by a broad audience.  I would not have been offended,  had you corrected me.  And I agree with your wise decision to discuss it in a separate thread.

-----------------

I just did a Google search on: semi

The first definition returned was: (North American) a tractor-trailer. "she pulled into the path of a semi"

------------------

As you may know, Google searches are not designed to be definitively "correct".  They are continuously refined to reflect common usage of the search word(s).

I have no problem with your more precise definition, and I hope that you no problem with my looser usage.

Different strokes. :-}

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Our daughter is a semi-truck driver. When she comes to visit in her truck without a trailer I don't call it a semi. She lives in it full time so it feels complete to me. But I can't call it a tractor either because I grew up in farm country and she certainly doesn't drive her truck into fields. So it's a truck. A BIG truck. I suppose I could call it an HDT but few people not on this forum would have any idea what I was talking about.

Linda

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I just thought the google reference was comical, guess I did not come across that way.... LOL, I did copy that straight from there.  Sorry if that offended anyone, but I"m serious bout the rest of the post.  Linda, I grew up on a farm in my younger days, live out in the sticks and work on a farm now part time, when I feel like it.  We always called them tractor-trailers, or just trucks.  I have drove many, even recently into the field.  I own many farm tractors at the moment, I do understand the confusion to some.  Everytime I hear/see someone reference a semi, the only thing that comes to mind is a flatbed or reefer, no HDT, connected to a camper.  Have to be there I guess... LOL  Oh, when she comes to visit without the semi-trailer attached, she is driving an HDT bobtail'd.  Not fun on slick roads, been there, done that.

Happy New Year Ya'll, keep those HDTs between the lines!

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3 hours ago, DanZemke said:

I have no problem with your more precise definition, and I hope that you no problem with my looser usage.

Different strokes. :-}

No problem, it's just a pet peeve of mine for many years.  I have even thought about buying an HDT if we go to a big toy hauler.  One thing for sure, I could buy one/convert with a bed for a whole lot less than this darn won ton DRW cost me.  Maybe I should have went that route.  But I sure would have not bought a s-trailer flatbed to haul my camper... ROFLMAO.  Me in better mood now!  Maybe a s-trailer reefer to haul more beer/food though.... hehehehe  Darn it, I have not had any beer yet.... better get my buttt in gear.

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English is a funny language that is constantly changing. We drive on a parkway and park on the driveway. What do you call that stuff you pull out of a box to wipe your drippy nose? If you call it a kleenex it had better come out of a box with the brand name Kleenex on it. And then, in some parts of the country, any sort of carbonated soft drink is a Coke - even if the actual brand is Pepsi.

Have you ever noticed those signs coming into some towns that say "No Jake brakes"? I suspect that if you have a competing brand, and got a ticket for using it, you might try to fight the ticket on the grounds that you don't have a Jake brake, but I don't know how far you'd get. (BTW, the Jacobs company would like to know where those signs are, as they like to protect their brand. Using a brand name in a generic fashion can eventually make the brand almost worthless.)

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5 minutes ago, kb0zke said:

English is a funny language that is constantly changing. We drive on a parkway and park on the driveway. What do you call that stuff you pull out of a box to wipe your drippy nose? If you call it a kleenex it had better come out of a box with the brand name Kleenex on it. And then, in some parts of the country, any sort of carbonated soft drink is a Coke - even if the actual brand is Pepsi.

Have you ever noticed those signs coming into some towns that say "No Jake brakes"? I suspect that if you have a competing brand, and got a ticket for using it, you might try to fight the ticket on the grounds that you don't have a Jake brake, but I don't know how far you'd get. (BTW, the Jacobs company would like to know where those signs are, as they like to protect their brand. Using a brand name in a generic fashion can eventually make the brand almost worthless.)

LOL, I drive on gravel roads and park in the barn on dirt.  For a drippy nose, a good shirt sleeve works!  Carbonated... I don't drink that soda junk, only carb'd beer I make.  Jakes?  all the signs around here say no engine brakes.  Go gettum Jacobs Co!  LOL, yea, american language is funny!  Now the English language, or brits, their's is even funnier!

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I was driving trucks (American English: “sem eyes”)  back when king pin connected rv trailers were not very common around here.  A guy told me he had bought a “fifth wheel” to “go camping”. 

I looks at him dumbfounded and says, “A Holland? What for, a windproof patio table?” 

Edited by noteven
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I've got buddies who call any motorhome a Winnebago.  Most people think an RV has to be a motorhome.  I've got a hard time calling a 40' diesel pusher with two air conditioners and three televisions that cost half a million dollars a "camper".  Anyone who calls that a camper ain't never been camping.

It's just words.  What difference does it make as long as you get the message across?

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Does this mean we're going down the atm machine and vin number rabbit hole again? There are all kinds of quirks and variations online, but no matter how much they bug me, I try my best to ignore them and just enjoy the conversation as it progresses. It's a work in progress.. Still trying to ignore vin number...:wacko: Jay

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Well, if ya wanna split up the 2 countries, how about cajun, spanish, german, mandarin, city, country, polish, swedish, many-many indian varieties, and I'm sure I missed a ton, all rolled up inta amer-e-can.  Then, I speak a dialect mixed with hoosier, kantuckian, new mex, aridzona, texican, floridian, nodak, german, irish/welsh... deese nodaks say I do talk funny (always been a gypsy)... LOL  Darn, I think this thread got way off track, it's HDT... love it!

Edited by NDBirdman
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Language does change over time and term use does vary from one group to another.  From encyclopedia.com:

Quote

Heavy-Duty Truck

Trucks are divided into light-duty, medium-duty, and heavy-duty classifications depending on their weight. Heavy-duty trucks have a gross vehicle weight of 33,000 lb (15,000 kg) or more (i.e. the weight of the vehicle plus the weight of the payload is 33,000 pounds or more). When a heavy-duty truck is pulling a trailer, it may have a gross combination weight of 80,000 lb (36,360 kg) or more.

Technically, a vehicle that carries the load by itself, without a trailer, is known as a truck, or a straight truck. Examples include certain dump trucks, concrete mixers, and garbage trucks. A vehicle that pulls the load in a trailer is known as a tractor. The tractor is coupled to the trailer through a pivot point, known as the fifth wheel, which is mounted on top of the tractor frame. Most of the big rigs on highways are tractors pulling trailers.

The term “medium duty truck” is a broad term that can relate to several different types of vocational trucks, making the exact definition of this term difficult to nail down. Technically, the term “medium duty” is a truck classification widely used by those in the trucking industry. Trucks are placed into classifications based on the gross vehicle weight rating. Medium duty trucks refer to truck Classes 6-7, which have a gross vehicle weight rating range of 19,501- 33,000 lbs.

 

 

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On 12/31/2018 at 3:10 PM, sandsys said:

Our daughter is a semi-truck driver. When she comes to visit in her truck without a trailer I don't call it a semi. She lives in it full time so it feels complete to me. But I can't call it a tractor either because I grew up in farm country and she certainly doesn't drive her truck into fields. So it's a truck. A BIG truck. I suppose I could call it an HDT but few people not on this forum would have any idea what I was talking about.

Linday

 

Edited by HomeSweetRV
Redundant
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Semi really means half LOL just my 2 cents worth. 

 

combining form borrowed from Latin, meaning “half,” freely prefixed to English words of any origin, now sometimes with the senses “partially,” “incompletely,” “somewhat”: semiautomatic; semidetached; semimonthly; semisophisticated.

Canadians cal them 'sem ees' Americans call them 'sem eyes'

The media calls them semitruck drivers all one word. 

Tomato tomato

Potato potato. 

Let's call the whole thing off! 🎼🎶🎶🥁

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On 12/31/2018 at 6:10 PM, chirakawa said:

 

It's just words.  What difference does it make as long as you get the message across?

 

Well said!

If you're talking to the/an owner of the vehicle in front of you - and know the term he/she would use, great - use it!

If not use whatever would work best in your opinion.

Ex:  (no vehicle in site, just shootin' the bull)

What kind of tractor do you own?

Ans:  A John Deere.

But at a truck stop.........to the owner of s Pete or Volvo, or......"Beautiful paint on your Semi -or tractor- or even (yikes!) Truck.

Kinda like being at a car show.  No info on a parked car.  Do you know brand - if it's not obvious (to you)?

How about a Henry J.  Can you spot the diff between a slightly modified 39 Ford coupe and a 40?

"Nice looking hot rod" - should work just fine.

How about the diff between a stock 40 Ford pickup and a 41 - as opposed to 40 and 41 Ford *cars* ?? 

Rotsa ruck - naming that "truck".

 

 

Edited by Pappy Yokum
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