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Frame Rail Extension Price


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Had you considered a HDT scrap yard?    When I did ours, got 6+ ft of the 300mm Volvo frame (both sides with a couple cross members) and 6 ft of some frame rails that fit nicely inside the 300mm stuff that I used as fish plates.   I think they charged me $10 a ft and they sent a guy our with a torch and fork lift to cut it and load it up for me.

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34 minutes ago, Mastercraft said:

Had you considered a HDT scrap yard?    When I did ours, got 6+ ft of the 300mm Volvo frame (both sides with a couple cross members) and 6 ft of some frame rails that fit nicely inside the 300mm stuff that I used as fish plates.   I think they charged me $10 a ft and they sent a guy our with a torch and fork lift to cut it and load it up for me.

yup could not find any around my area

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 11/11/2018 at 5:30 PM, runaway parents said:

3ft  then break  downward 6 ft  (might be less) to accommodate the dove tail

So you are extending 9' if I understand you correctly?  Really? 9' unsupported is not something I'd do. But then again, I'm not doing it.....Perhaps I'm not understanding correctly.

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1 hour ago, Jack Mayer said:

So you are extending 9' if I understand you correctly?  Really? 9' unsupported is not something I'd do. But then again, I'm not doing it.....Perhaps I'm not understanding correctly.

Interesting. Jack please go to page 38 and look up frame extension pics .You stated this was not going to be an issue. Now the bed is built and the frame is bought .And now you said you would not do it. Please explain. I didn't go cheap on buying frame material and liner no mild steel all hardened .

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So how far back is your hitch going to sit? 3 feet of frame flat then a beaver tail, if the hitch is in that first 5 feet, it shouldn’t be a problem. I am assuming that most of the beaver tail is just for loading purposes? It probably doesn't need much for frame rail under the body at the back.

I think people are getting the impression that your hitch will be at the end of that 9 feet.

Give us some hard numbers, distances, weights, how much drop on the tail, expected tounge weight, trailer weight. Then we can give you a better idea of the forces involved.

Just to give you and idea, my body essentially mounts to the rear of the original frame, and makes a 5 foot tail from there. It was designed to carry 4000 lbs midway down the tail,and bumper pull a 20000 trailer with 2000 lb tounge weight.  The frame of the body is 4 6inch channels.

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Exactly what moresmoke said. Extending it that far you better know your weights. And how far the pin is out. You just have to be careful in planning it. I assume you calculated the unloading of your front axle in the process. You can do a 9' extension but you are pushing the limits if you are putting the pin all the way out there. You just need to calculate everything out before doing it. Which I assume you have. Which is also why I said I probably did not have all the data. There is a LOT of tailswing and a LOT of dip when extending that far. Also has to be accounted for.  But people have done that much and more and they are still driving the rigs.

 

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1 hour ago, Jack Mayer said:

Exactly what moresmoke said. Extending it that far you better know your weights. And how far the pin is out. You just have to be careful in planning it. I assume you calculated the unloading of your front axle in the process. You can do a 9' extension but you are pushing the limits if you are putting the pin all the way out there. You just need to calculate everything out before doing it. Which I assume you have. Which is also why I said I probably did not have all the data. There is a LOT of tailswing and a LOT of dip when extending that far. Also has to be accounted for.  But people have done that much and more and they are still driving the rigs.

 

New bed Has 14ft of flat bed space 6ft of dove tail . From back of cab to end of stock frame 12ft. Have to ad 2ft flat and then turn frame downward 6ft to accommodate dove tail. Pin will be back from end of stock frame 7ft  with a pin weight of 1400lbs going to remain tandem. I hope this enough info to clear this up. New frame extensions are made to the same stock frame rail dimensions and out of hardened steel.  

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A pin weight of 1400 pounds is not much.  I don't think this will unload the front axle much.  How much weight will be carried on the bed ahead of the rear axles and even how much the bed ahead of the rear axles weighs can negate the unloading.  Staying tandem will definitely help with the stability.  Our pin is nearly 9' from the center of the tandem axles after adding 5' of frame and the pin is around 6,000 pounds but the bed is heavy and the toolboxes are heavy and when the RZR is loaded behind the cab the unloading seems minimal. Then add the car.  We have driven this rig for 12 years through some really rough and sometimes muddy terrain  and never has the HDT been unstable.  Your distance is long but 1400 pounds is not very heavy and the additional load carried in front of the rear axles can negate much of that.

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On ‎11‎/‎23‎/‎2018 at 3:35 PM, Randyretired said:

A pin weight of 1400 pounds is not much.  I don't think this will unload the front axle much.  How much weight will be carried on the bed ahead of the rear axles and even how much the bed ahead of the rear axles weighs can negate the unloading.  Staying tandem will definitely help with the stability.  Our pin is nearly 9' from the center of the tandem axles after adding 5' of frame and the pin is around 6,000 pounds but the bed is heavy and the toolboxes are heavy and when the RZR is loaded behind the cab the unloading seems minimal. Then add the car.  We have driven this rig for 12 years through some really rough and sometimes muddy terrain  and never has the HDT been unstable.  Your distance is long but 1400 pounds is not very heavy and the additional load carried in front of the rear axles can negate much of that.

Thanks for the reassurance we are planning to put a escape on it .After spending so much money on this bed restoring it and remodeling it Dws blood pressure was ratcheting up and I was going end up being a full timer not in  the Rv under it. Wasn't looking good. I kept on telling her we did our research did the math  dotted all the I, s and crossed all the t,s its going to work. Steel for the frame supposed to be delivered today. Going to be a busy weekend. There's know turning back now.

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As I said the weight added in front of the rear axles can offset the weight added behind the axles.  Our setups to often leave the rear axles without enough weight.  I am a firm believer in adding weight to the rear axle as long as it doesn't overly lighten the steer axle.  From your numbers you should be fine from a weight point of view. Our numbers are much more aggressive than yours and it has proven to be fine.  In fact it has been very beneficial as the added weight on the rear axles provides the traction we need in rough areas.  One thing to watch is to keep the height of the overhang such that it isn't dragging on uneven surfaces.  We go offroad  at times and that was important to us.  Also the front jacks on our 5er need to be all the way up as the overhang will accentuate the movement when crossing uneven ground.  Finally keep an eye on the swing out of the rear overhang in tight quarters.  Backing will be incredibly responsive and the 5er will track close to the HDT on turns.  We have enjoyed our setup for years and I expect you will enjoy your new rig.  Good luck and happy travels.

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11 hours ago, Randyretired said:

As I said the weight added in front of the rear axles can offset the weight added behind the axles.  Our setups to often leave the rear axles without enough weight.  I am a firm believer in adding weight to the rear axle as long as it doesn't overly lighten the steer axle.  From your numbers you should be fine from a weight point of view. Our numbers are much more aggressive than yours and it has proven to be fine.  In fact it has been very beneficial as the added weight on the rear axles provides the traction we need in rough areas.  One thing to watch is to keep the height of the overhang such that it isn't dragging on uneven surfaces.  We go offroad  at times and that was important to us.  Also the front jacks on our 5er need to be all the way up as the overhang will accentuate the movement when crossing uneven ground.  Finally keep an eye on the swing out of the rear overhang in tight quarters.  Backing will be incredibly responsive and the 5er will track close to the HDT on turns.  We have enjoyed our setup for years and I expect you will enjoy your new rig.  Good luck and happy travels.

THANK YOU very much. We got our steel delivered today from PG Adams. They did a fine job getting it to me .Time to get busy

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  • Phil D changed the title to Frame Rail Extension Price
On ‎11‎/‎29‎/‎2018 at 5:28 PM, Chad Heiser said:

No need to make pictures smaller to post here.  Use this link, drag pictures you want to post here into the box (or browse to them).  You will get a link to paste here that makes the picture show regardless of what size it is.

So I  went to the link you suggested  it mentioned something about cookies. There is when it went off the rails hmmm COOKIES!!!!!!!!!!! Cookie monster has nothing on this guy. Ok got cookies in hand  .Now what. Still wont post pictures. Don't know what cookies have to do with posting pictures. but they are darn good. Chad see what you have to deal with .Dw has to deal with this 24/7. I can stand 80,000 lb concrete wall panels all day long .Build ridged frame buildings all day long Build truck beds all day long . But when it comes to " cookies" it is over my computer skill capability's  . There's got to be a way to simplify this to make it a little easier.

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So many flatscreen engineers. I love all the responses. We are re-living almost what I went through when I built my bed except no one has yet to say you were going to kill everyone on the highway including women and children...lol Here is a reference for the OP. I have a 2013 Volvo 730 with a 227: WB. From the back of my cab to the end of my bed is 19'6". From the center of my rear axle to the center of my hitch is roughly 10'. From the center of my hitch to the end of my bed is 1'. My trailer pin weight is 4800 lbs. I haul a 6K lb 4 door Jeep Rubicon. I unload the front end of the truck 1025# when loaded. Front when loaded is slightly over 9K# (would have to look at the weigh ticket again). I have less tail over hand than a school bus. I actually went and measured a school bus. My overall bed weighs slightly over  5K#. It is way over built, but will not break. I have about 12K miles on the rig since finishing the build. I have had one issue, the truck rear air springs adjusted to fast from side to side making the trailer sway some. I talked to Donvel Controls and they built me a set of control valves that slowed the air transfer from side to side and I have a rock solid tow now with zero sway.

From my experience, everyone that gives you all the armchair antics and says it won't work, or you will kill people, or you will be popping wheelies, or you will have no control...etc has never built a truck. They run a short truck that someone else built and can't imagine how anyone could run something so long.

With that, you have to be cautious of the teeter totter effect on uneven ground. With this much over hang you will close the gap between the nose of your trailer and the closest object on your bed very quickly. If the front end of your truck climbs, or the rear dips it does transfer a lot of angle to the rear of the truck, just beware. Aside from the handling is awesome, backing is fast but very maneuverable. Tracking forward is nearly identical to truck tracks. Tail swing is no issue (be aware). Build your bed, enjoy your truck.

I tried getting help from those in the know when I started mine, I got the same answers as you, if I received answers at all. I finally said screw it, did all of my own calculations, had a plan B if plan A didn't work and went to work. MOST of the naysayers that have now seen it say wow, that is nice and it works great....lol

0313181543a.jpg.9941f95c72d16ba1319131891aed69e6.jpg

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6 hours ago, mrchips said:

So many flatscreen engineers. I love all the responses. We are re-living almost what I went through when I built my bed except no one has yet to say you were going to kill everyone on the highway including women and children...lol Here is a reference for the OP. I have a 2013 Volvo 730 with a 227: WB. From the back of my cab to the end of my bed is 19'6". From the center of my rear axle to the center of my hitch is roughly 10'. From the center of my hitch to the end of my bed is 1'. My trailer pin weight is 4800 lbs. I haul a 6K lb 4 door Jeep Rubicon. I unload the front end of the truck 1025# when loaded. Front when loaded is slightly over 9K# (would have to look at the weigh ticket again). I have less tail over hand than a school bus. I actually went and measured a school bus. My overall bed weighs slightly over  5K#. It is way over built, but will not break. I have about 12K miles on the rig since finishing the build. I have had one issue, the truck rear air springs adjusted to fast from side to side making the trailer sway some. I talked to Donvel Controls and they built me a set of control valves that slowed the air transfer from side to side and I have a rock solid tow now with zero sway.

From my experience, everyone that gives you all the armchair antics and says it won't work, or you will kill people, or you will be popping wheelies, or you will have no control...etc has never built a truck. They run a short truck that someone else built and can't imagine how anyone could run something so long.

With that, you have to be cautious of the teeter totter effect on uneven ground. With this much over hang you will close the gap between the nose of your trailer and the closest object on your bed very quickly. If the front end of your truck climbs, or the rear dips it does transfer a lot of angle to the rear of the truck, just beware. Aside from the handling is awesome, backing is fast but very maneuverable. Tracking forward is nearly identical to truck tracks. Tail swing is no issue (be aware). Build your bed, enjoy your truck.

I tried getting help from those in the know when I started mine, I got the same answers as you, if I received answers at all. I finally said screw it, did all of my own calculations, had a plan B if plan A didn't work and went to work. MOST of the naysayers that have now seen it say wow, that is nice and it works great....lol

0313181543a.jpg.9941f95c72d16ba1319131891aed69e6.jpg

What year is your Rubicon and how long is it? We own a 05 ford explorer  which is 190 inches long. Don't want to trade it for a escape which is shorter we are hoping it will fit on the truck. If it does it will save a lot of money. Our bed is basically the same as yours.

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