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While I was doing my DPF remove and replace for the $130 cleaning, there was this nice space behind the DPF that was just bothering me.  So, what could I do with this space. Its quite large, about 34 wide x 33 high (to maintain the same ground clearance as the DPF and fuel tank) and 27 deep.   The last guy must have put his tire chains there..... guess the chains don't mind getting toasted by the DPF.  

For this summers adventure, we are adding a 42 gallon Barker gray water caddy, but where am I to put it?   

Solving all that is bothering me at once.  Drop the spare tire from the coach and put the caddy in that HUGE volume under the very rear.   Now, that to do with the spare.......ahhhh - it goes behind the DPF.    

I did some CAD calculations (Cardboard And Drawing) in this case.....it fits. Actually, I can carry two spares now.

This is my tacked up fit check

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This is the finished design with heat shield

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I have a beginnings of a sheet metal heat shield on there but I need to add a lower flap to block heat from the bottom part of the DPF.

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There is a 2" or 3" air gap between the sheet metal and the pipe.  Plus, I have some of this Heatshield Products Armor exhaust blanket on the way along with the steel ties to contain some of the DPF regen heat.....maybe make the regen more effective?

I am also putting this blanket on the exhaust pipe from the doser to the DPF ( the floor gets pretty hot in the cab )

What do you think about wrapping the DPF itself with this blanket material?

I have seen working trucks carry a super single spare in this same location.

To address the wheel bouncing around, i have to machine a spacer and or bring out a stud or two from the many that are available behind the tire on the frame.

My welds, I can say they are better about the time I am finishing up the project. 😃

 

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Wrapping the DPF runs the risk of getting an overtemp fault, which is a stop engine and a derate so you probably don't want to go there.  Wrapping the tailpipe doesn't do much and probably isn't worth the cost of the wrap - except being able to package things closer to the pipe.  Sometimes you can't put a price on that!  Wrapping the downpipe doesn't help an active regen much since your DOC is in the DPF can, but it does help a lot with getting a lot more passive regen.  It may be worth it.  95% of the benefit you'll see will be your new doser, gasket, and new downpipe clamps and gaskets, but wrapping that pipe will help some to get more time between active regens.  All those pipes are wrapped on DEF trucks so that the SCR can hold minimum temps.

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  • 3 weeks later...

The data is in.  Ambient conditions, 95 deg, freeway rollers ( I 25 in southern NM), 63 mph.  Stopped at a rest stop and hit all the rig tires with the IR gun as I always do.  Fronts 125, rear outside 125 trailer 110....and that spare behind the DPF....109.  Sheet metal and mud flap heat shield between the tire and heat sources, combined with the fancy aluminum backed glass on the pipe between the turbo and DPF seems to be effective.  Also the passengers foot well is not hot any more.

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6 hours ago, Mastercraft said:

The data is in.  Ambient conditions, 95 deg, freeway rollers ( I 25 in southern NM), 63 mph.  Stopped at a rest stop and hit all the rig tires with the IR gun as I always do.  Fronts 125, rear outside 125 trailer 110....and that spare behind the DPF....109.  Sheet metal and mud flap heat shield between the tire and heat sources, combined with the fancy aluminum backed glass on the pipe between the turbo and DPF seems to be effective.  Also the passengers foot well is not hot any more.

I know nothing about DPF trucks except for what I have read here and in other areas about a regen. Is it true that regen is done with the truck stopped? You have to allow it, correct? IF so why  not remove the spares from the extreme heat during the regen and then replace. Doubt you will have an issue running down the road with heat build up, but in heavy traffic in the city lots of stop and go it might be different. I'd do that test before committing two tires and wheels to the area. Or maybe incorporate a small high flow fan that you can turn on to push the heat away, but not effect the regen.

Again I have an older non dpf truck and have not had any hands on experience.

Rod

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For what it's worth, not much, the tire is a 2006 vintage load range D original from the Teton. So, to your point, before I get anther wheel and put two Michelin XPS ribs on there, I have an Omega bimetal sensor meter I will hook up so real time temps can be verified.    In 7 yrs, the truck only seems to want to Regen when going down.the road.

Edited by Mastercraft
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You can delete all that DPF, EGR and DEF junk for around 5 grand.

 

Looks really good. I may just have to copy you. I have a small space left and wondered what to put there. I think I would wrap the pipe in rubber. Like an old mud flap or something. Just so the rim wont get all beat up bouncing around on there. Thank you for the idea!

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Based on concerns raised, after the pictures, I ran a ratchet strap, hooked the frame on both sides of the tire, and went over the mounting pipe...no wheel movement on the road, based on what the paint looks like where it's resting.  To be clear, the piece of mud flap is attached to the framing that supports the fairing, behind the DPF.

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  • 2 months later...

Greetings -  Post summer adventure update.   The spare tire didn't move a bit in 3000 miles.  Yes, there is a cheap ratchet strap to keep it snug against the frame, but the paint isn't chewed up on the wheel or the round tube.

Every time I checked it with the IR gun, it was 110 deg F or less.  During my one parked regen, with the fairing open, it was only slightly above ambient.  After that, I quit checking it.

Note to self - this is the last year for the Michelin XPS ribs.....they will be 8 yrs old, look fine, but not going to push it any more.  (had great luck, #15,000 on the axles)  New ones is the spring, best two become spares.  Anyone want a D load range, 0 miles tire with a 2006 born on date, made in China?  😄

 

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