Jump to content

Propane Regulator Adjustment


jammerjan
 Share

Recommended Posts

I just did a check of my trailer's propane system with a U-tube manometer. There were no leaks, but the regulator is only putting out 9.5" of water column. I went to adjust the regulator and found a flat aluminum disk where the adjusting screw should be. There seemed to be no way to remove this disk. Has anyone successfully removed a flat aluminum disk and gained access to the adjusting screw? Or are they making propane regulators so cheap now that they can't be adjusted?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can see where you could have a heavy draw on your system (furnace and water heater on at the same time) and you try to cook something the burner flame might be small. The regulators are of the "less expensive" variety ans even if you got the cap off it may not be adjustable. I would go to a propane supplier and purchase a new regulator from them. The normal pressure should be 11 inches water column, but you knew that otherwise you wouldn't know that the pressure was low.........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Mntom said:

The normal pressure should be 11 inches water column, but you knew that otherwise you wouldn't know that the pressure was low.........

That would be my guess as well. And that pressure should be measured at the inlet to an appliance and is usually done at the stovetop. On adjusting it, not all RV pressure regulators are adjustable and it sounds like you may have one of those. If the regulator is 10+ years old, I'd just replace it with a new one. You can get a reasonably good quality one from Amazon for about $30. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have used propane in vehicles, tractors two homes and many rv's over the last 35 years. I have only replaced one regulator in that time and it was due to putting of a odor not bad pressure.  The RVDOCTOR suggest checking pressure annually which is just generating business.  The propane industry is very over cautious. If they thought this should be done it would be mandatory without a doubt. One last thing DO NOT let your propane supplier know you are playing with regulator pressure or he will go crazy. Good luck!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

49 minutes ago, Kirk Wood said:

What he leaves me wondering is, when propane goes through that orifice, where does it go then? Out into the shop where he is working?

LP-Test-Device---Orifice.jpg

Apparently so, but the amount of time required to do the test properly is not enough time to build up an unsafe explosive mixture. I bet he is sure to not point it at any ignition source though........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, you probably could. The glowing ash from a cigarette is approximately 752 degrees (http://www.physlink.com/education/askexperts/ae1.cfm)

and the ignition temperature od propane in air is approximately 920 to 1020 degrees. ( http://www.propane101.com/aboutpropane.htm )

I would strongly suggest you don't smoke around any flammables, but the ignition source would be more of an issue........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I disagree with Dan Johnson, respectfully. If you don't know what you are doing for sure with propane do not mess with the equipment.  You might get away with it but somethings are not worth the risk even to save a little and I am the original cheapskate,   I am also a guy that had a propane delivery truck catch fire and burn while I was driving.  I also had 2 of the cheap regulators on a portable stove and a proapane heater catch fire over my 50 years of using it. I am not afraid of it but I am extemely respectful of it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, trailertraveler said:

Certainly no expert, but with all the cold weather in a lot of places, I am wondering what the temperature is where your propane tank is.

I am not expert either but I did heat a house with propane for several years while living in WY. We saw temperatures down to -20°F or so more than once and never had problems with propane delivery to our house. It seems that appliances in a house use the same maximum pressure (14" water column) as do RV appliances, according to propane 101.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for all your replies, I appreciate the feedback. If you want to build your own U-tube Manometer, go to www.rverscorner.com/articles/manometer.html  A manometer is easy and cheap to build and this articles also teaches you how to use it. I built one and I do my own check of the propane system annually. Better safe than sorry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/6/2018 at 2:31 PM, Ranger Smith said:

Standard is generally 10". I wouldnt waste my time trying to get that 1/2" out og it and I don't think your appliances will notice the difference.

 All LP appliances in our MH call for 11" minimum water column. Of course there could be misprints in the manuals.

Edited by Ray,IN
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On ‎1‎/‎7‎/‎2018 at 9:07 PM, Kirk Wood said:

I am not expert either but I did heat a house with propane for several years while living in WY. We saw temperatures down to -20°F or so more than once and never had problems with propane delivery to our house. It seems that appliances in a house use the same maximum pressure (14" water column) as do RV appliances, according to propane 101.

According to "propane 101" the set point should be 10.5"  of water not 14.  Hand slipped on the keyboard, I know you know better.  In the real world 10.5 to 14" of H2O.  but should be SET to 10.5 - 11.0 " and not drift higher than 14".

Edited by mscans
whoops
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, mscans said:

According to "propane 101" the set point should be 10.5"  of water not 14.  Hand slipped on the keyboard, I know you know better.

No typo at all. The 10.5" is the minimum and 14" is the maximum. In RVs, the regulator should be set to 11" of water column with the regulator lockup occurring at 12" which is 2" below the safe maximum.  See the article by the RV Doctor.....

Quote
Lock-up Pressure
In previous articles, I’ve stated that all propane appliances manufactured for RV use are set to operate at an operating line pressure between 10 and 14 inches of water column. All appliance makers and RV industry educators proclaim the propane system operating pressure should be adjusted annually to 11.0 inches of water column. Why 11.0 inches? It’s due to something called regulator lock-up pressure. That pressure contained in an RV gas system that has an open service valve on the propane container, and all the appliances turned off. In other words, there is pressure, but no flow of propane. In a properly adjusted system, the lock-up pressure, that pressure required in a gas system to close the seats inside a two-stage regulator and stop the flow of gas, is typically 1.0 water column inch above the set pressure.
 

 

Edited by Kirk Wood
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

Our program provides accurate individual wheel weights for your RV, toad, and tow vehicle, and will help you trim the pounds if you need to.

RV Cable Grip

RV Cable Grip

All the water you need...No matter where you go

Country Thunder Iowa

Nomad Internet

Rv Share

Dish For My RV.

RV Air.

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.

The Rvers- Now Streaming

RVTravel.com Logo



×
×
  • Create New...