Jump to content

Amazon Lockers


coachmac9
 Share

Recommended Posts

We were having some trouble with our Amazon shipments (wouldn't ship to a PO Box, didn't recognize the address of the RV park we are in) so we decided to give the Amazon lockers a try. We were a little hesitant at first but now we probably won't use anything else. Three times now our shipments have gotten to us in two days, very easy access and very secure spot. Just wanted to post this for any full timers that were looking for an option and weren't sure about this service, we absolutely love it!! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the locker convenience depends where you are. Both at our S&B(Williamsburg, VA) and our winter stop(North Phoenix) the lockers are 30-45 minutes away, in a direction we rarely go in. For us, It is easiest to have it delivered or pick up at a UPS site. I like the home delivery(no problems with our campground) but can see a use for the lockers in many areas. In the NYC they are putting the lockers in apartment buildings, they are secure and the doorman(if there is one) isn't bothered.

I personally have never even seen a locker. I would imagine they are in some typical bright Amazon  color.

It is rare I see the option for a locker delivery when I order. Amazon needs to propagate them a lot more. I am sure home delivery will stop one day but the lockers still have a long way to go.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are in an area that is used to train new UPS and postal service drivers. 

We've had Amazon parcels "out for delivery" 4-5 times. Each time the parcel goes back to the depot marked "no such address". 

They'll call us saying that if we don't pick the parcel up it will be returned to sender. 

We tell them to return it so we can order order it again but this time we'll make sure it is shipped with FedEx because they can find us.

The parcel arrives the next day delivered by a more experienced driver that knows the area.

 

I stopped using the lockers. There is no discount for my time/gas. In our area it takes 1-2 days longer to get from the warehouse to the locker and a notification to be sent.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of our grandsons lives in the DC metro area.  I sent him a Xmas present the other day and Amazon offered Same Day Delivery for the same no-cost of 2-day Prime delivery.  I took them up on the offer just to see how it worked.  According to my daughter-in-law it was delivered by an Amazon driver around 7pm.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Amazon is amazing with their delivery. 1-2 days is normal, rarely longer. My biggest complaint is I can't control how it is delivered and I  don't know which way it is coming until too late. I just would like a little more control. The other problems I have encountered is the pkg. is considered "delivered" when it arrives at the post office(if it goes that way), not when USPS deliveries it to me. And then when you try "General Delivery" not all PO's accept General Delivery from UPS or Fedex(Deming and Lordsburg are 2).

Many times 2 day delivery is really one day..........Its like Christmas every day.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, SWharton said:

The other problems I have encountered is the pkg. is considered "delivered" when it arrives at the post office(if it goes that way), not when USPS deliveries it to me.

With all due respect this is only true if you're using General Delivery or if the package is placed into a "box" for an RV park that may not get delivered to the park until later in the day.  Otherwise, USPS is very accurate with respect to when a package is delivered to the addressee.  I get lots of Amazon packages delivered to our TX mail service and I always get an email within a few minutes after the package has been delivered there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

34 minutes ago, docj said:

I get lots of Amazon packages delivered to our TX mail service and I always get an email within a few minutes after the package has been delivered there.

We have a significant part of our Amazon orders delivered by the USPS and we are on a rural route so the tracking isn't as accurate as that but when it shows as delivered, it is always either at our door or in our box.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, SWharton said:

That may be how it works in TX but not where we are. When the pkg. is delivered to the PO in New River we get a delivered note. We then know that we will get it the next day via USPS.

What I'm reporting is the way USPS says it is supposed to work and it has worked that way for us in several states.  It sounds as if the post office where you are located is too lazy to scan individual packages as they are delivered but there's probably not a lot you can do about it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, docj said:

What I'm reporting is the way USPS says it is supposed to work and it has worked that way for us in several states.  It sounds as if the post office where you are located is too lazy to scan individual packages as they are delivered but there's probably not a lot you can do about it.

I don't consider that a fair statement without some inside information. That "could" be the case but it might be beyond their control due to staffing os funding. The priority is to get the mail out and like anywhere else some will be better at it than others.  If I could find out that were true I would happily pull the trap door but I need truth first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, bigjim said:

The priority is to get the mail out and like anywhere else some will be better at it than others. 

From what I have observed on our route, mail carriers operate very much like the drivers for UPS and AmEx in that they use a hand-held scanner to scan each package as it is delivered. In our case, it can be slightly different as we live in a community with private streets and have one of the mailbox clusters down near the county road. That cluster has a small letterbox for each lot and several larger boxes, each with a key on the bottom. Our carrier typically arrives with the mail and larger packages sorted separately and they open the entire cluster with one large door that then allows them to put mail into all boxes. Once that is finished they scam all of the packages in the stack for our location at one time, then place them into the keyed boxes with the key to that box going into the appropriate letterbox. Should someone have a package too large for the keyed boxes, they deliver it to the house. Thus all packages for our 64 homes at this street address are usually scanned at one time. But each package is typically scanned as it is removed from the delivery vehicle, must like UPS/AmEx. 

I have only observed this for our mail route, but it does appear to be pretty much the same for several different carriers as we have had several of them just lately. It is true that the efficiency of the carriers does vary and so does the time of mail arrival. Our mail arrival is usually pretty consistent but our regular carrier has been out with health issues and that has brought us substitutes and temp people. 

Edited by Kirk Wood
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I got to wondering about Amazon Lockers in my area and discovered something interesting. There are are 9 of them in the Colorado Springs area with 7 of them located in 7-Eleven stores. Seeing that I looked at Denver and the same holds true. Seems that 7-Eleven has partnered with Amazon for a new revenue stream.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Amazon lockers are not everywhere, but we do use them when available.  Two campgrounds in Washington State did not take mail deliveries, so we used lockers.  One was in front of a Safeway grocery store and the other in front of a local electronics store.  Since Google mapped us at the electronics store I am constantly being prompted to answer online questions from Google map users about the store.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, Bill Joyce said:

Amazon lockers are not everywhere, but we do use them when available. 

Very true. When I looked them up Amazon said they were only available in about 50 cities/areas. Because of this I do not see them as a real benefit... yet. As they expand it may become more useful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

More and more carriers in rural areas are not employees but are contractors that bid on the routes and either carry the routes themselves or hire employees to carry the route.  I believe they have no benefits other than their pay.  Even the employeed carriers of old were paid on the basis of no. of stops/deliveries in many cases. They had to furnish their own vehicles and the up keep and got an allowance based the distance of their route.  At least that is what I was told.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, bigjim said:

At least that is what I was told.

The following information is from the USPS Publication 181, Join Our Team. I didn't find any official pay scale from USPS but the search seems to indicate it starts around $15/hour plus car allowance. 

Quote

Becoming an RCA is the first step on the path to becoming a full-time, regular rural carrier with full benefits, since RCAs are eligible to bid for these positions after 1 year of continuous service.

1
Quote

Summary of Benefits

While serving as an RCA, you will receive the following benefits: Annual leave and sick leave (when you serve on a vacant route for more than 90 calendar days or when the regular carrier is on extended leave). Overtime pay (for all hours worked in excess of 40 per week). Paid driver training (which may qualify you for insurance discounts). Opportunity to bid on full-time rural carrier positions after completing 1 year of continuous service as an RCA. Opportunity to purchase group health insurance (you may qualify after 1 year of continuous service).

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I started my postal career as an RCA. It’s a very physically demanding job and also difficult to find and keep RCAs. Not only are they usually required to provide a vehicle that can be driven from the right hand side (hard to find with all the center consoles) and keep it in working order, it took quite a beating. Much more than the allowance paid for upkeep. The worst part is an RCA has to be available to work 6 days a week if needed but may only be scheduled to work one day out of 14. You can’t support a family on that. So you had to have some other type of job or income that was flexible enough to leave you available if called in. Many RCAs quit in their first week. And you often waited for years for a full time route to open. After all, someone had to retire for you to get a route. It was quite an experience! All these years later I still occasionally dream I’m delivering mail 😂

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

Our program provides accurate individual wheel weights for your RV, toad, and tow vehicle, and will help you trim the pounds if you need to.

RV Cable Grip

RV Cable Grip

All the water you need...No matter where you go

Country Thunder Iowa

Nomad Internet

Rv Share

Dish For My RV.

RV Air.

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.

The Rvers- Now Streaming

RVTravel.com Logo



×
×
  • Create New...