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Alie&Jim's Carrilite

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Jim,

 

Personal experience with high winds between Amarillo, TX and Albuquerque, NM. Was six hours of slow speeds and white knuckles.

45 mph direct crosswind and abrupt maneuver can tip a semi with trailer. Gusting winds of that speed can cause complete lane changes. If winds would have been higher, would have been parked for the night. Luckily that area is monitored and I40 will be closed if winds become excessive.

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I've driven a lot more in high wind across the desert into the mountains then I care to think about. When my company pulled doubles it seemed like we lost a trailer at least a year.

 

Every truck is different and you need to learn the warning signs. All our trucks have had air dams over the cab that have been more of a pain to me in high wind.

Now most of my driving has been at night so you can't see trees or bushes blowing in the wind so you have to read the truck early.

My peterbilt when the wind started to get bad would begin to make wind noise letting me know to watch out.

My frieghtliner the CB antennas would start banging on the airdam warning me.

The Volvo day cab I have know is the worst!!

The wind hits the top of the airdam and compresses the rear suspension, at the same time you feel the front end start jack knifing with no other warning. It really wakes you up!! This is loaded or empty.

Our sleeper trucks (volvos) the drivers complain about the cab airbags being to soft causing the cab to really dance.

 

Now in RV use my peterbilt is great? No airdam and my toyhauler almost always has our early bronco in it making a heavy low center of gravity really planting the trailer to the ground. I have to be careful when passing motorhomes to remember I really disrupt the air blowing them all around.

 

One day we where in a heavy cross wind, I told my DW laughing to look in her mirror at the trailer. She looked and panicked OH MY GOD IT'S GONE!!! No just look in my mirror. You could see most of the side of the trailer as it tracked sideways.

Be careful guys

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One of our carriers that hauls for us was going the other direction on the bridge Thursday morning when the accident happened, and saw the truck go thru the guard rail. The trailer was empty and should not have been crossing with the high wind. He said that the trucker had passed some loaded trucks, and when he came out around them, the wind blew it thru the guard rail.

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This driver wasn't quite so lucky. I've always wanted to travel this bridge-tunnel...but having second thoughts now.

The Bay Bridge is a great drive on a good day, not so good that day.

Another highway/bridge that has potential to be dicey is 7 Mile bridge down in the Florida Keys. I've pulled some big boats across it and it always makes me think "What IF?"

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I've been in 45mph steady direct crosswinds with 55 mph gusts. They were closing I70 around us.....this was in KS. It is nothing to take lightly. We got off the road as soon as we could. In KS the bigger issue is brownouts. Until you have been in one you don't know how scarey it can be.....

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The DW and I just returned from a little getaway to Hatteras, NC. We were going to slip up to VA Beach for one night until the forecast called for 45 knot gusts that afternoon/evening. Sitting in the campground listening to the wind howl was enough for me, I wasn't about to cross any bridges in that wind!

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The Bay Bridge is a great drive on a good day, not so good that day.

Another highway/bridge that has potential to be dicey is 7 Mile bridge down in the Florida Keys. I've pulled some big boats across it and it always makes me think "What IF?"

We stay in Marathon right at the north end of the bridge. After crossing the bridge in a stiff enough wind that I had to keep the motorcycle (heavy harley touring bike) leaned into the wind to go straight, we learned to stay off the bridge on really windy days. Never really heard of any blowover problems like those mentioned here on any of the keys bridges in all times we stayed down there. I was always more concerned with the result of a "normal" accident. If you get thrown over the rail, you already several miles out to sea with a stiff cross current.

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I live here in Chesapeake Va and I didn't hear that the trailer was empty. At the time there was a Level 2 wind advisory in affect that restricted trucks and trailer requiring the trailer to a min load of 30'000 lbs. Having seen the pictures of the truck floating we thought the load had shifted to the front causing the rear to stay up. I still haven't heard that they have gotten the trailer or even looking for it or the cab. As has been said always be careful and listen to and OBEY the restrictions and advisories. Pat

 

 

The Old Sailor

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Update The report that the driver was picked up from the trailer appears to be false, A Navy helo picked the driver up out of the water. They tried to revive him but couldn't. The autopsy showed that he drown. The Va Pilot said he was passing a couple of trucks and a gust of wind got him. The trailer was spotted 20 miles off shore. It is floating and has been marked. The cab is close to the bridge and the owner company has been told they have to pay to remove it. Pat

 

 

The Old Sailor

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