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Warning! Geico is NOT fulltime insurance in Texas


Blues

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I just spent an hour on the phone getting a quote for fulltimer's insurance from Geico. When the agent first answered the phone and I said I wanted fulltimer RV insurance, he said I'd come to the right place, that they specialize in fulltimer coverage. Great!

 

After I gave him all my information and he gave me the quote, he tried to get me to sign up and pay for the policy right then, but I asked him to send me a quote instead, and specified that I wanted it broken down into the various elements instead of just a total amount.

 

He did so, and in examining it carefully, I noticed there wasn't a premium for fulltimer coverage, so I called back. I said I had a question about my fulltime RV policy quote, and the agent said he could certainly help me with that because Geico specializes in fulltimer policies, and there are one of only a few companies that do.

 

So I asked him about the missing fulltimer liability coverage premium from my fulltimer coverage quote, and he said it wasn't available in Texas. I said, "What?" He said Geico doesn't offer the liability portion that I was referring to. I said, "Then how is this a fulltimer policy?" He said it's written for using the RV 365 days a year and covers my personal effects, so it's a fulltimer policy.

 

I replied that the liability portion is an integral part of fulltimer coverage, and he said Texas is the one state where Geico doesn't offer it. So I said it's not a fulltimer policy if it doesn't provide the liability coverage that other people get via a homeowner's policy. He repeated that it is a fulltimer policy because it provides coverage for 365 days a year and covers personal effects.

 

I asked if there was some other type of coverage that would substitute for the liability portion that a homeowner's policy would provide, and he put me on hold for a minute, and came back and said no, there's nothing they offer that will be the equivalent of the liability portion of a homeowner's policy. Now would I like to pay for my premium in full or in installments?

 

I'm not often speechless, but that one got me.

 

So...WARNING! GEICO DOES NOT OFFER REAL FULLTIMER'S COVERAGE IN TEXAS.

 

And worse, they will happily let you pay for a policy without telling you that, and the ONLY way you'll know it is if you (1) get an itemization, and (2) scrutinize it enough to notice that there's not a premium listed for fulltimer's coverage and call and ask about it.

 

They should be ashamed of themselves. They knew my mailing address is in Texas, and my garaging address is in Texas, and even when I told them the policy didn't include essential coverage for a fulltimer, the agent still tried to get me to pay for it.

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Blues you were correct in asking for the expanded written quote as last year I had the same problem. I asked to see a sample policy either hard copy or on line and was told, After we receive your payment, we will send the complete policy. No thank you I kept looking.

 

I started to add Blue Sky to the list but looking for the link found this.

 

Blue Sky RV Insurance

The Blue Sky RV Program is not currently accepting new policy holders, but as a licensed agent Recreation Insurance Specialists, LLC can offer you coverage with one of our other carriers. Please select the “Get A Quote Now” button below if you would like us to provide a quote for you with one of our other RV specialty insurance carriers.

 

 

Also I found out last Year that Foremost would not cover some bigger vehicles.

 

Clay

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Another thing to check into is Total Replacement Value insurance (for a new RV). When we bought the RV in my signature, I was shopping around for insurance. We didn't need fulltimers insurance because we are no longer fulltimers; however, because the rig was new, I wanted Total Replacement Value insurance.

 

I was talking to one company (I think it was Geico, but I'm not totally sure) and their premium seemed reasonable. But when I inquired further, I found out that their Total Replacement Value insurance was only for a period of 18 months! Every other insurance company we've used offered it for a period of 5 years. So it pays to inquire into the details of the policy!

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What "bigger vehicles" are you refering to? Foremost insures my HDT and has since 2010. What state are you in?

I had my Vehicles with Farmers and RV's (Class C and then FW's) with Foremost for years which included my MS 38PS3. When I purchased my MDT truck last year, I was told they were not writing writing new policies for anything bigger than a Class 4 but was continuing existing policies.

I'm an escapee in Texas that spends the summer in the Midwest.

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While we are on the subject-

 

I am new to FT and bout a FT policy through Progressive.

 

That said, is the only difference between FT and non FT the liability insurance? And that is in case someone gets hurt in my RV?

 

If I don't want this can I get a regular non FT policy or am I missing some key element here?

 

There is no lien on the coach if that matters.

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While we are on the subject-

 

I am new to FT and bout a FT policy through Progressive.

 

That said, is the only difference between FT and non FT the liability insurance? And that is in case someone gets hurt in my RV?

 

If I don't want this can I get a regular non FT policy or am I missing some key element here?

 

There is no lien on the coach if that matters.

A FT policy specifically states you can live in the RV 365 days a year. It usually costs more than a standard policy because the RV is used more than a typical part time RVer with typical RV insurance would use the RV. The liability insurance can be a piece of a FT policy, but it is not what makes the policy a FT policy. The specification that the RV is covered for 365 days a year use is what makes it a FT policy. This is somewhat of an over simplification, but it hopefully clarifies the difference for you.

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A FT policy specifically states you can live in the RV 365 days a year. It usually costs more than a standard policy because the RV is used more than a typical part time RVer with typical RV insurance would use the RV. The liability insurance can be a piece of a FT policy, but it is not what makes the policy a FT policy. The specification that the RV is covered for 365 days a year use is what makes it a FT policy. This is somewhat of an over simplification, but it hopefully clarifies the difference for you.

 

Thanks for the explanation!

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A FT policy specifically states you can live in the RV 365 days a year. It usually costs more than a standard policy because the RV is used more than a typical part time RVer with typical RV insurance would use the RV. The liability insurance can be a piece of a FT policy, but it is not what makes the policy a FT policy.

 

The liability portion may not be what "makes" it a FT policy, but as far as I know, it's the only way someone without homeowner's or renter's insurance can get that type of liability coverage. Typical situations are when your dog bites somebody, if somebody gets injured when exiting your RV, if your kid throws a rock through somebody's window. And I saw a discussion somewhere about how it might cover you if your RV catches on fire, and the fire spreads to other RVs, and those people sue you.

 

Liability coverage is always included in homeowner's insurance and it's always included in renter's insurance. In fact, it's always included in even Geico's fulltimer insurance, except in Texas. I can't imagine why it would be any less important for people who happen to live in an RV, or for people who are domiciled in Texas and live in their RVs there or elsewhere.

 

My premium for the liability coverage is usually around $85/year.

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I agree liability coverage is an integral part of FT coverage and if I were FT whatever policy I had would include liability coverage. However, as the OP found, it is not what makes the coverage FT coverage. Coverage for 365 day usage is what makes the policy a FT policy.

 

If you try to live full time in your RV and only have typical RV insurance and submit a claim, your insurance company could deny that claim (if they discover you are living full time in your RV) because you do not have the proper coverage. It is important for people to know what their policy covers and does not cover in detail.

 

I have family and friends in the insurance industry and I have them review my policies and coverage on a regular basis to make sure I have the proper insurance and the proper financial coverage in case of a claim. Everyone should actually read their various insurance policies every time they are renewed or coverage or coverage company is changed so they know exactly how they are or are not covered. It can be tedious, but I believe it is a necessity. If you do not understand something in a policy or find something you do not want or that is missing it is your responsibility to go to your insurer and address the issue.

 

I also prefer agreed value or replacement value policies rather than depreciating value policies for RV's. If your RV is a total loss and you have a depreciating value policy, you are not going to get as much money for the loss as you will with an agreed/replacement value policy. I believe this is especially important for full timers who depend on their RV as their home. Imagine trying to replace your home 5 years down the road after you purchase it with a depreciating value policy. Who is going to make up that difference in cost to by a new replacement RV. The agreed/replacement value policy will cost more, but it is peace of mind insurance in my opinion. Others may not agree, but you should at least know the difference in the policy types or that there are different policy types so you can make an informed decision.

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The liability portion may not be what "makes" it a FT policy, but as far as I know, it's the only way someone without homeowner's or renter's insurance can get that type of liability coverage. Typical situations are when your dog bites somebody, if somebody gets injured when exiting your RV, if your kid throws a rock through somebody's window.

While the liability portion of a "fulltimer clause" of RV insurance is important, I'd agree that it is the 365 day/year coverage that technically makes it full-time, as many(if not most) RV insurance policies have a maximum time of occupancy for their coverage. Our current "part-timer" policy states no more than 180 days per year.

 

Where this can become important is if you also carry an "umbrella liability policy" because most of those are "excess coverage" policies and that means that they only pay for damages that exceed the liability of your other insurance and that they pay nothing at all in the event that you have no other coverage.

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