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Spare tire carrier


Bruce H
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Hi All,

This spring I'm thinking of purchasing the roadmaster spare tire carrier. My compartments are to small to hold one. If I have a blow out I wouldn't want to pay the price that roadside asst. would charge me for one.This way I'll have the correct tire.

I'm lookin to hear from people that have had them or have them. I'm interested in knowing the pros & cons of this unit.

 

Thanks

Bruce

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Well to start off i don't have a spare. but from what i have seen when an RV does have a blow out. having a spare tire is the least of your worries.

Tires should be pretty new on the unit anyways. One friend had front tire blow out. just about complete total. another friend had rear tire blow. an took out most of the bed room. At an average of 100 psi there's a lot of power that just got released.

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The odds of having a blow out is very low if the PSI is for the weight of the 4 corners is used.

 

If you pay out around $550 for the Roadmaster spare tire carrier plus buying a spare tire with rim. Never need to use it for 10 years then need to buy another new spare.

That is a lot of wasted $$$. Any RV ERS will bring the right size tire if you need one for a lot less money.

 

Last blow out I had was 12 years ago and it was with the famous Michelin zipper blow outs. Changed to G670's and then replaced them with G670's at 10 years.

 

I had the ERS bring me a new tire with that last blow out and the charge for the tire was less then what I paid per tire for the other 6 at a Dealer. I did carry that new one for a spare WO/Rim and never needed to use it. Ended up throwing it away. When it was 10 years old.

 

The Roadmaster may be worth the $$$ if you think you will have at least 2-3 blowouts in the next 10 years. And no one steals the spare. :(

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If I have a blow out I wouldn't want to pay the price that roadside asst. would charge me for one

Perhaps you do not know what the cost of a roadside assistance change would be. You didn't say what size tires you have.

 

I have used roadside assistance when I had a recap on my Volvo disintegrate. The cost of a suitable replacement installed was $100. I got most of that back the next day when I had new tires installed replacing the recaps. The side of the road is no place to buy ab exact replacement tire.

 

If you have 22.5" tires, those are not tires you can really deal with. They are too heavy and the torques on the wheel nuts are out of the range of normal tools.

 

The 17.5" tires for my trailer were at the limit of my ability to install and I have a Big Foot system to jack up the trailer.. You need to plan for a large enough jack to lift the RV.

 

Also, a spare ages out especially since it is not being used. The emoluments in the compound are not released just sitting there. So with a spare you add to the cost of a set of of tires on the maybe you will have a blowout.

Edited by Mark & Dale Bruss
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I'm not sure of the logic in throwing away a good 22.5 tire based on age if it has 3/32 tread or more left. You could sell that tire at any truck stop, the shop or parked trucker would be glad to pay a $100 bill for that tire. In fact you could resell any tire at a tire shop if it doesn't exceed 7 years old. (some shops may vary on the age issue)

Whenever I buy new tires, I put the best old tire in the spare tire rack. The idea is if I need the spare, it would just be for a short time until I get another new tire.

Greg

Edited by gjhunter01
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I don't understand the no carry spare concept even though the spare is rarely needed. All it takes is one bad experience such as a remote area or evening blowout and you could be in for a long wait on the side of the road. It's always good to have your own plan B and plan C and not have to rely on someone else. Even if you are not capable to change a tire, another capable person that comes along may be able to help if you have the tools and spare tire with you.

I pulled into a tire shop with a delaminated tire on my fifth wheel and the shop said it would be a 2 hour wait since the bays were full. So I made a deal with the manager and I removed the tire on the street curb and the tire machine operator changed the tire on the rim and I was back on the road in 30 minutes. The RV guy waiting in line ahead of me was not smiling when I drove away.

I have stopped to help people fix a flat on the side of the road and also have had to walk away because they didn't have a good spare. It's not fun standing on the side of a road listening to the driver make excuses why they never checked their spare.

Greg

Edited by gjhunter01
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I'm not sure of the logic in throwing away a good 22.5 tire based on age if it has 3/32 tread or more left. You could sell that tire at any truck stop, the shop or parked trucker would be glad to pay a $100 bill for that tire. In fact you could resell any tire at a tire shop if it doesn't exceed 7 years old.

Did someone say that they threw an unused tire away? I didn't, only that I replaced it. ( neither of my motorhomes had that size.)

 

I don't understand the no carry spare concept even though the spare is rarely needed.

I don't know about other folks, but I have never traveled without one but my experience does demonstrate the reason that most motorhomes today do not carry one. I believe that you would find that same thing true of at least some of the long-haul truckers as well. Because we don't stay on the main roads, I have always traveled with a spare tire for my RV, but the majority of motorhomes sold spend most, if not all of their time on modern highways or close to them and if you base the decision on cost, then you probably don't want to buy a mounted spare tire for a class A because they are so expensive and most owners either can't or won't change to the spare themselves, as well as the rarity of need. Tires have become very reliable nowadays.

 

Now that I am getting up in years, if I were to buy another class A I would not care that it had no spare tire as I'm long past changing one myself and we no longer go that far off of the beaten path. A spare tire is much like insurance in that they are a waste of money unless you happen to use it. The best answer is to choose the degree of risk you take compared to the cost of having one.

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I respect your post, Kirk. I was merely pointing out that there are 2 sides to every coin or another angle to look at a problem. Some of these forum post only show one opinion and a reader might be led to believing that there is only one solution.

These forums are great to solve a problem with a solution that I had not thought of before. In a past employment we were encouraged to (think outside the box).

Greg

Edited by gjhunter01
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Thank you all for your response to my spare tire topic. I guess at this point in time I'll hold off on buying the rack & Spare tire. I see the logic in not carrying one. I do have Good Sam ERS. I don't think I'll be in many remote areas at the beginning of my retirement travels.

Thanks again

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After having to replace a tire last year, repair a tire the year before and having a blow out about 4 year's ago, I'm also leaning in the spare tire area. Each and every time I've had tire issues, my two RV specific Road Side Assistance carriers(Progressive Insurance and AAA) insist they DO NOT provide for Road side tire service, they instead insist that they will Tow you to a facility or put your mounted spare on. Admittedly I got AAA to pay for the service call on the blow out and the repair facility brought a new tire(took about 90 minutes to convince them). Last year was the same issue, both telling me that I could arrange Roadside Tire service and submit the Service Call for payment consideration. As a result of my separated tread on 4-5 year old tires, I'm now left with mis matched tires(Yokahama and Toyo). Oh well, I guess I'm the only one who has to argue with my carriers to get tire service.

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Each and every time I've had tire issues, my two RV specific Road Side Assistance carriers(Progressive Insurance and AAA) insist they DO NOT provide for Road side tire service, they instead insist that they will Tow you to a facility or put your mounted spare on.

It sounds like you need a better road service like Coach Net.

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It sounds like you need a better road service like Coach Net.

Maybe like Good Sam would work also. All services provided. Join now for $69.95 renews at $117.95

 

Flat Tire Service

A service technician will replace a flat tire with your inflated spare or we’ll tow your vehicle to the nearest professional service center.

 

On occasion and whenever possible, we will make arrangements for the member to purchase a tire(s) for delivery to the disablement scene.

In these cases Good Sam Roadside Assistance will pay for delivery of tire only, member is responsible for all additional costs including cost of tire(s), mounting, balancing, other parts or labor, tax and any

other fees. Note:

Does not include seasonal tire changes. Member responsible for parts and labor.

 

Coach-Net Towable Plans $179

Coach-Net Motorized Plans $249

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I think that's a good idea.....I'm happy to see that actually written into the service agreement. Maybe I'll suggest AAA and Progressive have a look at what Coach-Net offers. I've tried every argument with negative results, it seems they would rather Flat bed tow my MH to a facility( who know's the cost of that), rather than send a tire out with a tech. Coach Net is sounding pretty good.

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  • 2 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Bruce....to small width.... or length ?  Do you have a pass thru ledge in a compartment ?  Our compartment was "too small", but I came up with a clever solution and got a mounted spare in there.  Too dumb to post a photo.

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On 1/29/2017 at 6:51 AM, Biker56 said:
 
 

Something is really strange here as I find that same information, yet I have Coach-Net Basic($79) on our travel trailer which is due for renewal in mid-June. I just went online and did a renewal with a $10 discount for early renewal and my card was billed a total of $69?

I think that I recall noticing that same discrepancy last year as the renewals show BASIC for $79, PREMIER COACH $149, and PREMIER TOWABLE $129.  It would appear that there is no new enrolling in a basic plan and that renewals on the Premier plans are discounted?

Edited by Kirk Wood
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  • 1 year later...

Very few new coaches today come with a spare tire or a place to carry one. That is likely because it is so seldom that one is used. We owned 2 different class A motorhomes, one for 8 years and the second for 14 years and both had spare tires. In all of that time we never once had the spare tire for either coach mounted on the RV. Since you have already spent the money, I do understand wanting to carry it but adding a rack under the rear of the chassis is likely to be difficult and expensive. 

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I think we are missing the point.  In my mind, when deciding on carrying/not carrying a spare it depends on what size tires your RV has.  Obviously when I had my fivers I carried mounted spares.  Actually with one of them even had a TPMS sensor on the spare.  

I think when you get into 22.5" tires is where you pretty much have to draw the line.  The only reason you would be hauling an unmounted 22.5 spare around is for some mobile service or other tire service to use in case you needed it.  Most of us won't be changing a 22.5 tire along the road ourselves.  Even if I could possibly figure out a way to force a spare into my lower storage I certainly would not want to give up the space for something I may never need.

Now if you are talking about smaller MHs with smaller tires/wheels then maybe under certain circumstances it would be a good idea to carry a spare.   

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