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WiFi Ranger Core wit "Booster Tube" antenna


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I currently have an Alfa / Booster Tube WiFi system in my travel trailer purchased through TechnoRV


I just read everything on the MIA web site about routers and I think a WiFi Ranger CORE would be a great upgrade over the Alfa 36 router I'm currently using.


Will the Booster Tube WiFi radio and antenna work with a WiFi Ranger CORE? I believe it is only 2.4GHz so I wont have the advantage of the 5GHz the CORE offers


The Radio on the Booster Tube antenna uses POE. Are all POE connections the same?


Would it be a simple Plug And Play?


I also have a Ubiquiti Nano Station locoM2 radio/antenna that I use as a mobile WiFi extender.


Could this be used as a directional WiFi radio/antenna with a WiFi Ranger CORE?



THANKS!


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I'm sure that with enough effort you can get your Alpha to work with a WiFiRanger router. However, we don't provide customer support for folks that wish to connect non-WFR equipment. WFR products are designed to be plug and play and a lot of effort goes into making that happen. There's no particular reason why we would assist in making a competitor's product work with ours.

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AND.... How about using two Ubiquiti Bullets, one on 2.4G and one on 5G and some type of LAN switch to switch between them as needed.



These bullets can directly connect to an omni mount antenna or a directional antenna and use a simple network cable to the route (WiFi Ranger CORE?) and are a very reasonable cost.


Just thinking a bit out of the box here....


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There are lots of things you can do that will "work". It just depends on how much initial effort, and ongoing effort, you want to put into the project.

 

The injector may work, or it may not. I don't know the specs offhand. But you want to be cautious about overpowering some devices. For example, if they are rated for an 18 volt injector, putting a 48 volt to them is generally not a good thing.....but sometimes it does not matter. Putting less power than required to them generally works, within limits. It also depends on how much voltage drop is in the line...but in an RV that is rarely a factor. You can calculate all that if interested, and see if an under-volt injector works. Overvolt...not so much.

 

Why would you "need" a 5 gig Bullet? Almost no AP's run at 5 for clients (and you would be a client). Some do, now, but very, very few. You are unlikely to encounter one, IMO. But as AC becomes more common things do change.

 

In my experience, putting together a cobbled up system is fine for a hobby activity. But for something that you want to work reliably and with little "help", I don't recommend it.

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Thanks Jack...Turns out the Booster Tube uses a USB connection and not a Network connection.......

 

My understanding is that WiFi Ranger is going to be working with RV Resorts to start using 5G.

 

"WiFiRanger Announces “Passport” – Partnership with RV Parks for Guaranteed Fast Wi-Fi"

As reported by Technomadia

 

 

I also thought 5G was used by the camp to communicate with other 2.4G end points around the property and if you had the equipment you could use the less overloaded 5G part of the system.

 

As it turns out, I'm just going to open the wallet and get the Ranger devices and be done with it. The software and ease of configuration is worth the few extra $$ after a bunch of research.

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...I also have a Ubiquiti Nano Station locoM2 radio/antenna that I use as a mobile WiFi extender.

Could this be used as a directional WiFi radio/antenna with a WiFi Ranger CORE?...

I don't know for sure if the compatibility with the old WFR Boost has been eliminated from the CORE or not has I do not have one. However, it is still mentioned on page 10 of the WFR Manual currently on their website. With the WFR Go and/or Go2, the Nanostation is plug and play and will work with either the POE port or using the Ubiquiti POE source and one of the other ports. If it is configured using a computer it will also work as an internet source using the ethernet WAN settings when attached to a Go or Go2 and some other routers. Used in this manner, the plug and play features of the WFR control panel do not work and you must go into the Nanostation's dashboard to view and change the Wifi connection.

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I also thought 5GHz was used by the camp to communicate with other 2.4G end points around the property and if you had the equipment you could use the less overloaded 5G part of the system.

 

 

 

One of the proposed new WiFiRanger initiatives will be the installation, at some parks, of premium service 5.8GHz wifi connections which would permit higher data rates, etc.

 

You are correct that some parks currently do use the 5.8GHz band for their backhaul connections. This new initiative would be separate from that use but would probably use the same hardware.

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The 5Ghz is used for backhaul in some situations.....eg. between the park equipment, and not for client use. This will expand to clients in the future, but is not widespread today.

 

The initiative by WFR is a good one and I hope that it works and becomes widespread. Installations of TenGo with modern equipment work quite well WHEN there is enough backhaul to the Internet. That is really the issue....Internet backhaul is deficient in many areas. But having certified equipment with a specialized path for those that pay is a good idea. Nothing new here, but if marketed properly it should work well.

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The 5Ghz is used for backhaul in some situations.....eg. between the park equipment, and not for client use. This will expand to clients in the future, but is not widespread today.

 

The initiative by WFR is a good one and I hope that it works and becomes widespread. Installations of TenGo with modern equipment work quite well WHEN there is enough backhaul to the Internet. That is really the issue....Internet backhaul is deficient in many areas. But having certified equipment with a specialized path for those that pay is a good idea. Nothing new here, but if marketed properly it should work well.

 

Jack:

 

From my perspective it appears that Tengo management is acutely aware of the bad reputation they have in the RV user community and is committed to taking actions to change that negative image. This partnership with WFR is one such step. Obviously, in areas with limited backhaul nothing is going to make a bandwidth-limited wifi into a good one. But getting the park to install pay-to-play higher bandwidth service is a good start. At least those who depend on internet access for work purposes would have a viable alternative to cellular.

 

Joel

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