Jump to content

HDT Spare Tire?


les_garten

Recommended Posts

These trucks are running what is probably the most common size tires in North America. Spares are everywhere, including on the road to Alaska.

 

Do you have the strength, skills, and experience to handle changing one? I do, yet I don't carry a spare. I do carry cash..........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my opinion, it is worth carrying a spare dismounted tire. It means that all you need is someone with the right tools, instead of also finding someone with a suitable tire. It can make a several hour difference in wait times for someone to get to you on the road. If you have a spare, all they have to do is show up. If you don't have a spare tire, they may have to swing by the shop to get one, or you may have to call several providers before you find someone with a tire that you want on the truck. If it's outside of normal business hours, your options become more limited.

 

I've had a few tire failures on the road. When I have a spare tire, it costs me about $150, not including a tip, and has taken as little time as 90 minutes from failure to being back on the road. When I don't have a spare, it costs me closer to $600, since I'm at the mercy of whomever has whatever tire available and what they charge for it. And that has taken as much as 5 hours.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You've got 6 or 8 tires. With the weight we carry, I'd feel safe with one less on the drive. So rather than be held hostage I'd put a drive tire on the steer, or single up to get to the nearest shop. I'd call whatever road service you have & let them do the change. Just another reason I like my dual tandem on the trailer, too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm comfortable going a few miles with one tire failed out of the 8 drives. But not at highway speeds and not for more than a few miles. I've always proceeded to the closest safe location to wait and have the tire changed. I've had both casing failures (explosive and total loss of pressure) and partial tread failures. I really don't want to drive at any significant speed or over any significant distance with a partial tread failure.

 

Driving like that to a place that has a replacement tire and can change it in a reasonable amount of time is almost never a matter of a few miles. At least my luck has never been that good :)

 

I'm an advocate of having a spare dismounted tire. The absolute worst case is you spend money on a tire that never gets used and you sell cheaply (or throw out) when your mounted tires age out. But anything outside of that worst case and you are going to be time and money ahead.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pros and Cons to which ever direction you decide to go. For most of us here we are going to age a tire out before we wear it out. Personally I have only had 1 tire issue with the truck over the past 7 years. In my case a bolt punctured thru the tire but was leaking about 10psi an hour. With out the TPMS I doubt I would have found the problem as quickly as I did. Luckily I was able to stop and put air in the tire to keep it up until I was able to find a repair shop and replace the tire later in the day.

 

Another con is the storage space needed for the spare tire. If you are a full timer that space may be even more precious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am an advocate of carrying a matching spare. Nothing to annoy a generally picky bunch like us like having one different tire from the rest. Plus in my case the 235/80/22.5 is an lowpro size you can't find in most truck stops. Mounted or unmounted likely won't make much difference in the cost of a road call, and unmounted is lighter and a little skinnier to store somewhere. I carry a mounted spare mostly because I already had a spare wheel, and have a nice spot in a compartment where I never have to move it around.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You guys all brought up things I have been thinking about.

 

If you carry an unmounted spare, is is a steer or drive?

 

My Trailer would have 22.5" on it as well FYI

 

Trailer I am contemplated would be 40K pounds or so FYI

 

Nobody carries a "repair" kit? Is there such a thing?

 

Would you guys do it any different if you were driving the Dalton Hwy?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I carry an unmounted drive spare that matches my other drive tires. I'm considering carrying a second unmounted spare that is an "all position" tire.

 

If you carry an all position and use it, then you will definitely want to change it out at the next convenient opportunity, but it doesn't have to be immediately. Just another option to consider.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nobody carries a "repair" kit? Is there such a thing?

 

 

 

They do sell a repair kit, I have one. If you do repair a tire with the kit I would suggest to go to the next tire shop to have it properly repaired. I plug without a patch can let air get in between the ply's and the tire will fail.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good repair kits are expensive, but worth it. I've "plugged" two tires on my grain trailer over the past 16 years, and they are both still in service. Last one was about 5 years ago. (This is not an OTR trailer, and yes, the tires are now 16 years old)

 

That said, plugging a truck tire can be difficult. I've wasted a bunch of plugs.

 

If I do carry a spare, it will be whatever I can get used and cheap. I can run a drive tire on the steer axle (other the other way around) until I can get to where I can buy the proper tire.

 

So, I've had semis on the farm since 2000, and we bought the Volvo in 2010. Other than the two trailer tires mentioned above, I've never had a flat. How much do you want to invest to be ready for something like never to occur? Buy premium tires, take care of them, and don't worry about it. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For what it's worth, I had two tire failures on a single trip within 900 miles of each other this year, and another one three years ago.

 

This is the plug kit that I carry:

 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0080IFG5S

 

The mushroom head plugs are supposed to seal against the inside of the tire like a patch would. Every tire that I've used them on has never leaked again,which probably amounts to about a dozen with that kit. I really like it a lot.

 

But I wouldn't use it on a truck tire unless I was desperate. And even then I would take it slow and easy to the closest shop that could replace the tire for me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I carry a tire repair kit and have used it . I use mushroom patch/plugs with a 3/8" stem and 2 1/2" head that go on the inside of the tire after buffing, cleaning and glueing the inside of the tire around the puncture. When the patch is properly applied, it will last the life of the tire. I carry a 20 ton jack, a 1" impact and tire tools and tire mount lubricant along with the other things needed to do a proper repair. That being said, I would use a road service if it was available. The rest of the stuff is for peace of mind. A spare would be nice if I could figure out a good way to carry one. Charlie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very Interesting info.

 

I had heard about the Mushroom repair kits in another thread by a guy on a Motorcycle on the Dalton Hwy.

 

Looks like I would approach this issue two different ways.

 

In the US, just rely on roadside assistance.

 

On the Dalton Hwy, (if I ever do something that crazy and feel like piling abuse on a beloved vehicle), carry an unmounted spare.

 

And carrying the Mushroom repair kit seems like a good idea no matter what.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We use http://www.usrider.org/ for road service. They'll cover large RVs and trailers.

 

Compliments on an EXCELLENT choice for ERS !!

 

I don't have a "Dolly" to trolly (no hay burner) - so I had a "picky" question when I was considering ERS options.

 

Which was regarding their definition of what they considered a "trailer". Horse trailer, or?

 

Sent an e-mail to US Rider with my concerns / questions. Not only did I receive both an e-mail reply and US Mail reply,

I also received a call from Linda Lee, Dir. of Operations, US Rider Equestrian Motor Plan.

 

Ans; "ANY trailer you tow with a motorized vehicle will be available for all US Rider emergency assistance services up

to the normal limits of the membership".

 

And, under (their) definitions:

"The term 'horse trailer' or 'trailer' shall mean a non-automotive vehicle that is towed by a Motorized Vehicle".

 

That was in 2014 - so not sure if she is still the director, but willing to bet she (or her replacement) will answer your Qs

regarding their service/s.

 

BTW - another xln't "option" is the AMA - American Motorcyclist Association.

Great services for whatever you -and family members- drive & tow (although towing is limited to 35 miles) for $49 a year.

NO motorcycle ownership required.

 

Had a nice chat with the gal there - about HDTs (single or tandem) and she was happy to give me the number of their

"parent" national Motor Club.

 

Sorry - forget the results on the latter - but I still have both (the ERS's) for my vehicles, both motorized and/or towed.

(For me the HDT Q became a moot issue - as I didn't have one - just checking my options).

 

:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...