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What 5th wheel hitch recommendation?


dartmouth01

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I am doing research on new 5th wheel hitches and my head is spinning a bit. I'm familiar with them, having used a 16k Husky slider single jaw 2 axis when we full timed for a couple years. But we are going up a little bit in weight for our next rig, and this time, I'd like to get something a bit more fancy (if worth the money) and in the 18K range. I would love something that will help with ride quality (ie chucking and such), but still allow me to hitch up on unlevel ground, and also be light enough that I can move out out of the bed myself when needed. The Husky had a center removable pivot so I could move the head and the base separately. I would appreciate also keeping the slider option, but that is least important, considering that I used the slider only a couple times on the Husky in the 2 years. And, it seems that the newer rigs have the curved front caps for better clearance than what we had on our previous rig. I really like the simplicity and weight of the Anderson setup, and it does move the pin back about 9 inches for more clearance, but it doesn't offer any improvement in the way of ride quality (other than perhaps alot less slop in the system than the Husky I am used to. Anyone want to suggest some others that I should look at more closely? Thanks!

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You will get a lot of opinions on this one! Some of the often mentioned hitches in that weight range with a bit of suspension built in (in no particular order) are as follows:

 

Comfort ride:

 

http://comfortridehitch.com/

 

The ET

 

http://ethitch.com/

 

Trailer Saver

 

http://www.trailersaver.com/

 

Take the time to check them out on line and search for these names on the forum.

 

There are a few others but I see these mentioned here most of all. I have seen them all, but I do not own any of them so I will not comment. I’m only about 12k right now so I’m running a B & W with no issues. This one works well for me because I need to switch back to gooseneck also.

 

(Heads up on topic, Moderators may move this over to Fifth wheel category)

 

John

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I like the TrailerSaver hitch and possibly add a MORryde's pin box to reduce chucking.

http://www.morryde.com/product-category/5-rubber-pin-box

 

Going up in weight you might also consider some rear air-lift bags, they don't increase your capacity but it is nice to have the truck drive level when hitched and they may help the rear ride stiffness a bit.

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On a LDT, a B&W companion is hard to beat. on a MDT or HDT, take a look at the Trailersaver.

 

The Companion comes out in two pieces and only leaves a hole in the bed when removed that is filled with the gooseneck ball that is turned over.

 

If you have a newer truck with the puck system, several other hitches will also work.

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Thanks, I will check those out. I've seen a few different ones in person at the rv dealers but they all have looked so heavy and unwielding. Aso a full timer I want to have the flexibility of being able to remove by hand (or leaving attached to the pinbox) when we are stationary for a few weeks (so I can throw my dirt bikes in the bed).

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Thanks, I will check those out. I've seen a few different ones in person at the rv dealers but they all have looked so heavy and unwielding. Aso a full timer I want to have the flexibility of being able to remove by hand (or leaving attached to the pinbox) when we are stationary for a few weeks (so I can throw my dirt bikes in the bed).

 

That doesn't rule out the Trailersaver, it is a bit heavy but has a two piece option as well as rail and under-bed mounting options.

 

http://www.trailersaver.com/easy-installation/

 

On removing the hitch, before going full-time we found that we could leave our hitch attached to the fiver and just pull the pins from the rail, then using the fiver to lift it off the bed. Getting it back on the rails wasn't easy but it was easier on my back than lugging it out of the bed. I ended up making a lifter in my garage too, used it to pick the hitch up and then put a cart under it so I could roll the hitch out of my way.

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I also found the Andersen Hitch very cost effective and easier to hitch and unhitch under any conditions. Perfect for short beds and mine did a 90 degree jacknife as well as I did with a long bed. However I detested the ride of my short bed as it had been chipped and suspension modded and I decided I preferred the long bed Ram, and found one after a lot of searching. Had I kept the short bed I'd have kept the Andersen if the long bed only had a gooseneck. My long bed came with a Reese 15k rated already installed.

 

Worth a look.2 minute video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJDZrmzBa3c

 

12 minute video with a lot more: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMW-ynhTatA

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I think I am heavily leaning on the Anderson. It occurred to me the 30lb weight will be a good savings on the overall gvwr and weight over the rear axle. Just curious, what did y'all pay for it plus install? Hoping it'll also be good for the budget.

The only install would be for a drop in ball in a gooseneck connection.

I bought a new Ram 3500 and concidered the Anderson but went with a B&W 25k puck hitch. Just drops in.

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I also have the Anderson mentioned above, albeit the steel version that weighs 70lbs. I have a fixed ball gooseneck hitch in my truck which I didn't want to remove since I also have a GN horse trailer. I spent so much time researching the best options but finally went with the Anderson because of the ease and simplicity of being able to do it by myself (even at my 5'5 110# size) and it's reputation, as well as recommendations from members on this site.

 

Now I have used it there were two things that stand out to me...ease of hook-up due to being easy to see over my tool-box and it works to hitch on uneven ground, and it also makes your camper a lot harder to steal due to the more unique hookup. Just a couple more of the benefits I have found.

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IMHO, the Andersen is the only way to go. There is no slack in the hitch so no chucking/bucking due to that. Saves about 300 lbs of payload and there's no drama to removing or replacing the hitch. Less than 5 minutes to take the tension off the ball and pull the pin then a child can lift it out of the bed. Plenty of room in my shortbed F250 CC for a low profile toolbox and a 3KW generator. Installation of a turnover gooseneck ball and the Andersen hitch was roughly the same cost as the purchase of a conventional hitch. What's not to like.

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Dartmouth, What truck do you currently have. You can buy an Andersen for the rail setup or to be seated on a ball for the gooseneck. My f350 came ready to accept a ball for a gooseneck so for me it was just a matter of dropping in the ball, placing the Andersen hitch over it and tightening it down. My dealer for our fifth wheel did the original installation for free but I have had the whole thing off, including the part that attaches to the hitch on the fifth wheel, and it is really easy to do. They have very good instructions and videos on the Andersen site.

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I have an 07 2500HD (new body style, not classic) with the short bed, and I don't think gooseneck factory prep was an option then. My understanding is that I can either get the rail version of the Anderson (maybe even bolts up to where the rails were for the Husky hitch I had?) or have a gooseneck installed in the truck, and then get that version?

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Dartmouth,

I think you'll be shocked at the ease of install and the perfect view of the ball while hitching. No more shoving hard to make the hitch ride up and lock as with the standard fiver hitch design.

 

Hitching up a regular gooseneck trailer was more difficult than the standard fiver hitch because it was out of sight. The regular fiver hitch still hides the pin if not level to start. This one is easier than both. You'll see.

 

I would go aluminum now too, having just had very successful back surgery, I will take much better care of it from now on.

 

You will need a torque wrench. I use both a 1/2" and 3/8" torque wrenches from Harbor Freight. They are good enough for close enough applications like this for me.

 

My fiver is a 2003 I put a new roof on, and is not made to work specifically with short beds. You can see the Andersen hitch attached in this picture.

 

P6300009%20Small_zpsvznpts7x.jpg

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we could leave our hitch attached to the fiver and just pull the pins from the rail, then using the fiver to lift it off the bed

 

Works like a charm....just push the button.

 

Yes, getting it back on takes a little fussing to get the alignment right, but still mo muscle required.

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