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DPF DEF Equipment


Av8r3400

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A question for the folks running the newer (2008+) trucks:

 

With the "lighter" loads being put on an HDT by RV hauling, does the life or service of the DPF suffer? Is there enough heat or work being generated by the engine to properly manage these systems? What about turbos? Catalytic converters? Is the lighter work easier on these systems? I don't seem to hear much about them on the forums, so maybe my concern is unwarranted?

 

I can't buy new, so warranty will not be an option for me on an HDT. I'd hate to know the cost to repair or replace this equipment on an HDT.

 

 

 

These issues concern me because of my recent experience with "modern" emission controlled Diesel engines. I had a 2012 VW that failed 3 turbos and the associated exhaust system parts (DPF, Catalytic Converters), luckily all under warranty. Each of these repairs was over $9000 for an automotive sized system. Needles to say I dumped the car before the warranty expired.

 

Thanks again for tolerating the newby questions...

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I expect the long periods of inactivity while being parked for weeks (or months) would be far more harmful than simply driving with "light" loads that RVers typically drive with. If you're concerned, there's an easy solution. Get more tools! Your rig will certainly be able to handle it. :)

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Yes and No. You are right on track with your thoughts. No the equipment does not suffer, but yes you need to do maintenance more often to ensure sensors and the intake manifold do not get coked up from EGR due to the lack of load and heat. You need to understand how and what these systems are trying to do in order to have a reliable truck.

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Thank you both. I take the low number of additional replies to mean that emissions related issues are really not very common.

 

I find that when talking to local "experts" all I ever hear is horror stories about the emissions systems and those awful automatic transmissions on the newer trucks. I've been taking this advise with a large grain of (hopeful) salt.

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Thank you both. I take the low number of additional replies to mean that emissions related issues are really not very common.

 

I find that when talking to local "experts" all I ever hear is horror stories about the emissions systems and those awful automatic transmissions on the newer trucks. I've been taking this advise with a large grain of (hopeful) salt.

Have you thought of talking to the "other local Experts".....the heavy tow truck operators.....these the folks at the end of the 'hook" and the first $$$ often spent when DPF/EGR hickups occur.....

 

Our older Shaker depends on a clean running fresh maintained low mile engine to stay off the "hook" but even simple trucks can have breakdowns...

 

By far the best thing you can do is pile the miles on.... friend has a 1988 Pete that is too clean to touch....he joked it has only been on the "hook" Four times in the +4,200,000 that he has driven the rig and that's every 1,000,000 miles when he has the 600 CAT "hooked- out" and made better than new again....his timely advice is to drive the rig...a LOT.

 

I am ashamed to say that our Shaker suffers hugely from lack of use and wile caring for mom last year it sat unused for EIGHT months....very bad.

 

A few members of the forum use their HDTs regularly but even those members miles are very low use compared to the commercial operations these trucks are built to sustain.

 

Trucks are not cheap to operate...even more expensive if you fail to operate them often......use it...or lose it....

 

Drive on.....(Pete has +4,200,000 and looking better every day...drive a lot)

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Have you thought of talking to the "other local Experts".....the heavy tow truck operators.....these the folks at the end of the 'hook" and the first $$$ often spent when DPF/EGR hickups occur.....

 

 

The local person I have been speaking with mostly, is a heavy (and light) tow operator and indy shop owner. He is also the shop that has offered and I would (probably) have single the truck.

 

The flaw, in my very novice opinion, is that he is the guy you go to when you have a problem. If everything is going fine, he never hears about it. That could make his opinion a little biased. However, he has been my go-to mechanic shop for years and I trust him.

 

I'm a planner and a researcher and I don't like vehicular surprises. I am contemplating a fairly sizable (for me and my family) financial investment and I am trying to be honest with myself about it.

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I am contemplating a fairly sizable (for me and my family) financial investment and I am trying to be honest with myself about it.

Not sure what price / year trucks you are considering, but if you do your research and really understand what these trucks are trying to do and how they accomplish it, I think you'll be way ahead of the game. If you aren't capable of doing some work, you could find yourself at the hands of a mostly under- trained parts changers. And that goes for a Chevy or a Peterbilt or your coach. An educated consumer and maintenance is the most effective defense. The HDT forum and Resource Guide (though it's gotten a little long in the tooth) are a great places to start. The engine manufacturer's websites and forums are wealth's of information to protect your investment. Just my humble opinion

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X2. You need to decice how important different issue are, to you and your family. Make list of pros and cons. Older mechanical engine mean less emmisions systems to go wrong, but bring an older chassis with lilely more rattles and poorer ride. Want a smoother, quieter ride? apy up, and be prepared for DEF, EGR, Particulate filterr issues.

 

We bought a 2001 truck. I knew going in it was past it's prime, but was willing to risk it as it was relatively cheap. My biggest issues, so far, have been electrical, and corrosion. Old wiring will crack and let moisture in, Grounds will get rusty and cause all sorts of symptoms. Supports will rust and let you cab settle on the Alaska highway.

 

Good luck in your search. I wouldn't go back to a smaller truck for anything.

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Thank you for the further replies.

 

I am fairly handy, mechanically. I worked as a machinist and welder for 15 years, I have a degree in manufacture engineering and currently own and operate an auto glass business. This past January I finished rebuilding an airplane from the ground up. link

 

I am hoping to build a truck within a $30-35k budget which is approximately half of what a new 1-ton would cost. I am looking to stay with a 2-peddle automated transmission, which the iShift is the benchmark for operations in the 5-10 year old trucks that I am looking at. This means I am looking at Volvos, my preferred model being the VNL64T630. I plan to build my own bed, eventually. I can handle maintenance and most tasks in the build, but have no interest or equipment for the "heavy" work of singling the truck. Other people are more skilled and better equipped than me. My philosophy is that I can make more money doing my job than I can save doing someone else's, at least that phase of the build.

 

The emission systems don't inherently scare me, but I have heard horror stories from friends, customers, acquaintances and first hand on the cost of repairs. I'm trying to determine if these "stories" have any weight, if any, in this community of operators.

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I deserved that. Switch suppose to be in Tuesday. I was being conservative with 30ish with ishift. Best price I found for a decent truck easy close to 50k. You do get more emissions with ishift though

 

Glenn,

you can not be held responsible for the freightshaker wiper system!!

I just could not resist the post.

If you had a Volvo, there was a long learning curve for that system, you did not know.

 

Roger

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I went and looked at one at my local Volvo dealer for $25k. D13, Ishift, 630, decent all the way around. Only problem it was a heavy smoker's truck. My DW is allergic to the smoke residue.

 

Dealer told me more would follow...

With a good cleaning and the chloride dioxide canisters to sanitize the air you can get the smoke smell out. We bought one that was used by a heavy smoker. I went to Walmart and bought a $89 fabric steamer and many rolls of paper towels we replaced all the a/c filters, removed all panels that could be removed and cleaned every part of the truck we could after a weeks worth of scrubbing and two rounds of the dioxide canisters no more smell.

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I have a 2009 with 2800 miles that has needed many parked regens but hasn't needed the laptop on it that I can remember. It doesn't really go anywhere, but what's inside the half open Coke can that's been in the cupholder since 2011 scares me more than the DPF! That said, if the stuff makes you nervous part of a pre-purchase should probably include a DPF cleaning to be sure it can pass the test while you can negotiate. DEF truck should probably add a DEF filter change and if it really scares you then a doser change and decomp tube inspection to get all the crusties out. That's not an every day used truck thing but I'm sure you can pay to get it done.

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