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Recommendations for what rig to get


Myddrin novak

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Hello, first time on a forum so this is new to me, I have a question as to what RV or travel tralier would you all recommend? It would just be me and my dog traveling, I was looking at the rpod and camplite campers but have been told that they wouldn't be able to full-time, I would like it be small to help with gas milage and I don't need that much space, the only thing that is a must have is a bigish bed. I'm just trying to get a broader pool to look at and any advice would be gratefully accepted,

thank you

myddrin.

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There will always be folks who say 'you can't'....but you are the one who has to make that decision. I chose a toy hauler bumper pull

so I have the wall space to create my own décor. Won't haul toys to speak of, but do have my office set-up, bookcase, couch

and other homey things. Every person should take what's important to them, what makes them happy, what they need. The toy

haulers have better carry capacity, more water volume, have the rear ramp that you can fashion into a deck, they also give you more openness when

you have the room to deploy the ramp. There are some on the smaller side that might work for you. What kind of weather you plan to survive

in makes a big difference in what is going to suit you. You also should be aware of the capabilities of your tow vehicle...that's discussed in

many threads. Good Luck.

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Casita, Scamp, Oliver, etc. come to mind. These are fiberglass egg-shaped trailers that have been around forever that hold their value well. If you get one with both a back dinette and a side dinette you can leave the back one set up as a bed yet still have a table for daily use.

 

Linda Sand

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Full-timers use all sorts of RVs so even R-Pods of Camplite which you were looking at would work. However, good insulation, a sealed underbody and double pane windows really help. Even though you might plan to be in temperate areas you will find yourself in either cold or hot temps at one time or another and those three things help keeping you comfortable and lower your electric/propane usage. Also, good size holding tanks are great if you plan to do any dry camping or boondocking. Regarding gas mileage, keep in mind that you will most likely park the RV perhaps a week or more and will just be driving your truck so you're really not hauling around the trailer all the time. Good luck!!

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Welcome to the Escapee forums! We will do our best to help you as much as we are able, but it would help us to give advice if we were to know a little bit more about you. When you live in your RV fulltime, there are a number of things to consider that would not apply to one who travels seasonally or for vacations. A major issue is to know how much storage capacity the RV has and what the weight limits are. For safe and reliable RV use you need to understand that both the RV and the tow vehicle come with designed in limitations. It is also important to realize that the RVs at the lower end of the price range are also of lower quality and so will not last as long when under constant use. Comfort is also another major issue when the RV is to be your only home. Just what you actually need will depend more upon you than any particular rule of guideline, but some things cross all such boundaries. Since it is almost impossible to totally avoid freezing temperatures, such things as enclosed and heated waste tanks and plumbing are vital. For comfort in both heating the RV and in cooling it, good insulation in roof and walls as well as dual pane windows is also very important. While it may be possible to live in an RV that doesn't have the best quality of construction, insulation, or dual pane windows, the lack of them can make living more challenging and difficult. Fulltime RV living is supposed to be enjoyable so use care in your choice of RV both for quality and size. I would also suggest that as a new RV buyer, you would be wise to consider joining the RV Consumer Group and take advantage of the materials that they supply to new members. I also suggest that you spend some time visiting the many websites of those who contribute to these forums, by following the links that can be found in many of our signatures. One more thing to consider is reading one or two books on the subject of fulltime RV living which can be fouund at your local library or purchased from Amazon.

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Welcome to the Escapee forums! We will do our best to help you as much as we are able, but it would help us to give advice if we were to know a little bit more about you. When you live in your RV fulltime, there are a number of things to consider that would not apply to one who travels seasonally or for vacations. A major issue is to know how much storage capacity the RV has and what the weight limits are. For safe and reliable RV use you need to understand that both the RV and the tow vehicle come with designed in limitations. It is also important to realize that the RVs at the lower end of the price range are also of lower quality and so will not last as long when under constant use. Comfort is also another major issue when the RV is to be your only home. Just what you actually need will depend more upon you than any particular rule of guideline, but some things cross all such boundaries. Since it is almost impossible to totally avoid freezing temperatures, such things as enclosed and heated waste tanks and plumbing are vital. For comfort in both heating the RV and in cooling it, good insulation in roof and walls as well as dual pane windows is also very important. While it may be possible to live in an RV that doesn't have the best quality of construction, insulation, or dual pane windows, the lack of them can make living more challenging and difficult. Fulltime RV living is supposed to be enjoyable so use care in your choice of RV both for quality and size. I would also suggest that as a new RV buyer, you would be wise to consider joining the RV Consumer Group and take advantage of the materials that they supply to new members. I also suggest that you spend some time visiting the many websites of those who contribute to these forums, by following the links that can be found in many of our signatures. One more thing to consider is reading one or two books on the subject of fulltime RV living which can be fouund at your local library or purchased from Amazon.

Ok so for more information about me, um, im a 22 year old veterinarians assistant who lives in a one bedroom one bath apartment with my amazing german shepherd alyx, I started looking into fulltimeing about 4 months ago and am trying to read everything I can find on the subject. The first thing I looked at was a truck camper but realized that it was too small for alyx to be comfortable, I've played with the idea of a fith wheel before deciding that I just want a tow behind, I would like to keep it under 35,000 dollars and thats all I can think of right now tthoughI have added buying books to my list of things to do

Thank you

Myddrin

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Just a thought but if you have a chance, stop by a local RV park and walk around and see what other people are using....talk to them. Most owners are more than willing to talk about their rig and give advice. You will probably be invited in to see how they do it.

That is a really good idea and i think im going to try that, thank you so much!

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Casita, Scamp, Oliver, etc. come to mind. These are fiberglass egg-shaped trailers that have been around forever that hold their value well. If you get one with both a back dinette and a side dinette you can leave the back one set up as a bed yet still have a table for daily use.

 

Linda Sand

Thank you! i will be adding those to my list to check out.

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The other thing is to go to an RV dealer or show and sit in as many RVs as you can. As you sit there, imagine where you will sleep and cook and what your day will be like. Lay on the bed to see if it fits you. Also, take off your shoes and stand in the shower. Also, sit on the toilet, lid down of course, to see if you can close the bathroom door around your knees.

 

In other words, try a few trailers on for size and practicality. Also, look at minor adaptations. For example, I hate the dinettes so I made sure I found a motorhome where there was nothing preventing it from being removed so I could replace it with my leather recliner.

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Well, you have been given much good advice, I would only add, based on our experience, to allow room for your dog to have his space, bed, crate, mat, erc. You and your pooch will be spending some long rainy, or otherwise unpleasant weather , days in a confined area. We ended up removing a jacknife sofa to make room for our 85 lb lab.He now has his crate there, with room for a chair left.

 

Carl

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For full time, you want to get a trailer that would be OK with you and the dog in it after a few days of rain. You want something well insulated with double pane windows. You want enough storage for you and your dog. Full timing is very different than short trips. You want something very well made.

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Another consideration is the amount of time that you expect to be traveling, as compared to the time that you will be parked in the same location in order to keep your job. At 22 unless you are independently wealthy, I will assume that you will need some source of income while you RV. Are you thinking of living in an RV while you continue in your present position, of are you thinking of providing your income by work-camping as you travel? While that is certainly possible, it does add an additional challenge. Yet another thing to consider is the social life that you now have or wish to have since the vast majority of us who travel extensively in RVs are much older than yourself, even among the single folks. There is a growing number of families entering the lifestyle and while there are some younger single folks, they are not frequently seen on the road.

 

There is really very little by way of challenges that can't be overcome if you want to be fulltime badly enough, but the more things that you consider and address before you commit to this life the happier you are likely to be. Mobile income sources do exist and there are more each year, but even yet that issue keeps the majority of fulltimers in the retired category. Another reason for the age typically found is the problem of health care provisions for those not eligible for Medicare or covered by a plan from a previous employer. For many, health insurance is their largest single expense. You can do this but it requires careful planning before you burn your bridges.

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Another welcome, youngster! <grin> As Kirk said, most of us have to look quite a ways back in history to get to when we were 22. Before you start looking at specific rigs, I suggest that you first figure out your "mission profile." What plans to you have for income? How long will you stay in one place? How long do you think you will full-time? Do you have a tow vehicle now, or will you be buying that, too? What hobbywork equipment will you need to take with you? Since you are single, and already have the dog, you can guesstimate how much space you will need.

 

Remember that, no matter what sort of RV you choose, you will most likely have one vehicle towing another one. You have already mentioned the travel trailer and fifth wheel, both of which are towed by something (usually a truck of some sort). A driveable coach can tow another, more fuel-efficient, vehicle. Generally, a towable is recommended for those who are going to remain parked for longer periods of time, and a driveable is the preferred choice for those who more more frequently. ANY motor home, gas or diesel, needs to be driven (not just idled) for long enough to get all fluids up to operating temperature at least monthly. That usually means a drive of 50 miles or so.

 

My suggestion to you is to start looking at your mission profile as you look at every single RV you can get into. Don't pay any attention to either price or condition, just layout. There are only so many ways to arrange the interior of a box, so once you know what layouts work for you (there will probably be two or three) you can begin looking for those plans. As others have mentioned, pretend to do your daily activities. Remember that some designs will make you climb a full flight of steps in order to get from outside to the bathroom. If that's where the dog's food and water are, is that going to be a problem?

 

While I'm thinking of the dog, what will be dog be doing while you are at work? An "accident" in an RV isn't a pleasant thing to deal with, and few parks will let you leave the dog outside all day while you are at work. Also, is Alyx a barker? Specifically, what happens when you are in a park with rigs so close you can shake hands with your neighbor while both of you are inside and that neighbor is working on his coach while you are at work? What will Alyx do when people walk past while you are gone? If you don't know, try setting up a sound-activated recorder at your current home and see what happens while you are away. Barking dogs, inside or outside, are a MAJOR issue in many parks.

 

Once you have settled on the type of RV and the layout, you can start looking at specific rigs. Buy a USED coach. There are many threads on the forums about depreciation, and very few people get it right the first (or second or third) time. If you end up going with a towable, either buy the trailer first or at least buy the truck based on the HEAVIEST gross weight of the trailers you are considering. If you decide on a motor home, pay attention to three weights: empty weight, gross weight, and gross combined weight. The difference between gross weight and empty weight is how much stuff (people, pets, food, fun, etc.) you can carry. The difference between gross combined weight and gross weight is how much you can tow.

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