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Outside wheels instead of Duals


Circ

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OK thanks to you guys, I nixed the idea of using super singles. The dealer selling me the 730 suggested I leave the axles as is and only use the outside wheels of the duals. Essentially having four wheels but a wider stance. This configuration was also recommended by an OTR driver I know. Does anyone employ this configuration? Why or why not? Is it because there will be limited or no room for the ET hitch behind the rear axle? My OTR friend says the ride will be substantially better. So close to pulling the trigger on this truck I can feel the air ride seats.

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We've "battled" this topic nearly to death in a recent thread, but it essentially comes down to more bearing wear because of the asymmetric loading without the inner tire, you'll chop your load capacity by roughly 50% (not exactly though) compared to dual tires on a single axle, and you'll have left four great spare tires at home.

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I converted to super singles because it was it was important to me to have the rear axle track with the front axle. This is for a 4x4 MDT that I take on rough/unimproved roads.

 

IMHO, eliminating the inner tires just reduces safety and redundancy unless you have a performance reason for doing it. I definitely don't get why you would want to do just the outside dually wheels.

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If you run just the outside tires on your HDT you should be just fine. If you are hauling a fifth wheel, your HDT axles are only carrying a quarter of their design load weight. You will save weight, slightly better fuel mileage, and even get a better ride. Tire cupping has more to do with improper tire pressure and bearing wear is non existence with such a light load. If you get a flat tire issue, just pull the other tire off and let the axle hang until you get to the repair shop.

Greg

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If you run just the outside tires on your HDT you should be just fine. If you are hauling a fifth wheel, your HDT axles are only carrying a quarter of their design load weight. You will save weight, slightly better fuel mileage, and even get a better ride. Tire cupping has more to do with improper tire pressure and bearing wear is non existence with such a light load. If you get a flat tire issue, just pull the other tire off and let the axle hang until you get to the repair shop.

Greg

Not so easy with air suspension. If it's the axle with the leveling valve, the other axle will likely deflate fully, dragging your untired axle on the street. If it's the axle without the leveling valve, the airbag will go to full extension, also dragging your axle on the street. You've also taken a 34k-rated tandem, cut that in half with only four tires, and now cut it in half again with only two tires, so 9.5k. If your truck is stock, you're almost out of capacity bobtail. If you have a bed on your truck, you're overwight on those tires even without the trailer.

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HH RV Resource Guide Single versus Dual Wheels

Thank You! I am fairly new to this and haven't figured out all the cool resources you have available! I 'll try to do more research before asking redundant questions in the future. I am a little surprised this guide did not come up when I put 'super singles' in the search box (for a previous post).

 

Very clear and informative information including the pros and cons of both. Thanks again.

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. I am a little surprised this guide did not come up when I put 'super singles' in the search box (for a previous post).

Which search box? If you had put "super singles" in the HH RV Resource Guide search box you would have gotten the above link.

 

If you want to search the Escapees Forum use Escapees Search on the HH RV Resource Guide.

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If you run just the outside tires on your HDT you should be just fine.

.....unless you come to Texas and get stopped by a cop with a little knowledge of trucks. If it was made with a tire in a position, in Texas it must have a tire in that position. Emergencies are one thing, just removing the inner wire cuz ya want to is no bueno.

 

If you are only going to run 4 tires, then why not just single the truck? The law gives you 20,000lbs on a single axle. 4 tires with a weight rating of 6610 each is more than enough to get the max capacity, but with 2 tires you are limited to the tire rating, maybe 7100 (or less) each, you just dropped to 14200lbs allowed for that axle, a 5800lb loss of carrying capacity. A tandem set of axles is the same thing. 34,000 is allowed, with the 8 tires you are ok and can get that capacity. With 4 tires you are limited to 28,400...you just lost 5600 lbs. And as was mentioned previously, if you are towing your trailer and have a flat, you are screwed. Removing the opposite tire and chaining up the empty axle puts you trying to haul the truck weight, any bed load and the tongue weight on a single axle with only 14000 lbs of carrying capacity? My single axle with 3 tires, in an emergency, would still be rated to carry the rated 20,000 lbs (6610 x2 for one side and 7000(?) for the other where the flat was) . 6000 lbs more capacity, a much better safety margin.

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Mark and Dale,

Apparently I was doing it backwards as I was not aware of the HH RV Resource guide. I was using the search box at the top of the Escapees forum. I will try the HH RV resource guide next time I am looking for information or getting feedback on my wild ass ideas.

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.....unless you come to Texas and get stopped by a cop with a little knowledge of trucks. If it was made with a tire in a position, in Texas it must have a tire in that position. Emergencies are one thing, just removing the inner wire cuz ya want to is no Bueno

 

If this is about a commercial plated rig, then yes, I agree. I may be wrong here, but I believe this doesn't apply to a private vehicle. I've seen dually PU's all over the country run on singles. As to singling a truck, this is a major expensive option. If you run the tandem axles with single tires, you should still have 20,000 lbs rear axle load capacity. I would not have a issue with overloading a tire for a 20 mile run to a tire shop vs calling a mobile repair. When I was trucking, that was just another day.

Greg

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Sounds like many other laws.

 

On the books, seldom enforced. Lots of trailers and dually pickups here in Houston missing one or more tires.

 

But a good excuse to pull you over if they feel like it.

 

Run big mudflaps close to the ground and close fenders so its not obvious.

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