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OT: the danger (?) of a cracked windshield


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I have a relatively new toad (2016 Chevy Traverse, with 11,000 miles). Today I parked the car at a fast food joint and had a quick lunch. When I git back to the car there was a "S" shaped crack from the bottom of the windshield going about 8" towards the middle, right in front of the driver. I'm positive it wasn't there when I parked it. Now I'm sure my insurance will cover this, but I am in the middle of Colorado and there is no glass place anywhere near. If needed, I can get to one but it is a 2 hour drive.

 

Question is, if I don't do anything until I get to my home base in Houston a 4 months, am I risking serious problems? I'm prepared to do what it takes but I also want to try to take the easiest way to fix this.

 

John

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I've seen friends drive around with big cracked windshields for months without problems. I can't personally let it go that long because I'm paranoid, but I have had to drive around for a few days, so i put some clear tape over the crack and hoped for the best. I had to replace my 2500HD windshield once, it was only $170 so i paid out of pocket instead of bothering to go through insurance.

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Call your insurance now, that will get a note in your file and save possible aggravation later. Your agent should be able to find you a repair truck that will come to you and replace the glass. Our last repair took about a half hour and was done in our driveway.

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Too much hand wringing over nothing. On 2 different vehicles, I've driven home with a hole completely through the glass. The 1st was a horse strike on a '71 Nova, that took most of the passenger side out of the windshield. The 2nd was a '11 GMC with a rock from between the duals on a gravel trailer. Cracks everywhere, glass shards everywhere, and a hole I could put a fist through. Admittedly, those vehicles aren't as engineered as a package as the OP, but duct tape, packing tape, or Gorilla tape isn't going to stop crack progression either. Keep an eye on it, expect it to grow, travel on.

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x3 to the Safelite option. If you are in the middle of Colorado, it suggests you may be away from the speeds of Interstate driving, and may also mean you are more likely to be ticketed by State Patrol if they see you driving with a crack in the driver's line of site (you can ask me how I know :rolleyes: )

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Contacted my insurance company (Geico) and they will have Safelite replace the windshield next Monday for the deductible of $50. I'm having it replaced at their shop, since that is easiest for me (and I'm more comfortable for a shop replacement than a field replacement). Best way to handle it, in my opinion...

 

Thanks for your replies.

 

John

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Windshieds of vehicles are two pieces of glass basically laminated together with a film in between. The reason for this is to keep the occupants inside should there be a head on collision. They have been made like this for many years, even before seat belts. It is very difficult to breakout a windshield. I know this from my many years in the fire service and having extricated many more people than I care to remember.

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