Jump to content

Tow Ratings


Alie&Jim's Carrilite

Recommended Posts

I thought I would drop this here....

http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2016/07/18/2017-ford-f-series-super-duty-is-torque-and-towing-king/

 

The result is a maximum gooseneck trailer rating of 32,500 pounds for the F-450 SuperCrew 4x4, which can also pull a 21,000-pound conventional trailer, and an F-350 with a payload rating of 7,630 pounds.

 

 

For those that don't want to open the link, the paragraph above is the best sentence I've read about capacities lately.

Note the word gooseneck that I enlarged. Not 5th wheel, or trailer with a large frontal mass.

And they say that they are the leaders of the pack now. So where does that actually leave Ram?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The problem when you get up to the heavier end of the ratings is not what they can tow, but what they can put on their rear axle. That is why Ford - to date - has an F450 that really is not near as capable as the Dodge. The rear axle GAWR is too low. So it cannot take the heavier pin trailers, where the Dodge can (in the 5500/450/550 classes). It will be interesting to see new data sheets. Right now the Dodge 5500 is the "super-pickup" of choice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have to remember that in some cases in towing that much, a CDL will be required for that weight. Also, it's still a Powerstroke, don't trust any of those engines, too many problems. I would stick with the Cummins. I looked at the 5500 before buying the Volvo. Couldn't find one that didn't look like it was excessively abused for under $30k. Paid less than that for the Volvo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sinbad there are powerstrokes supplied to Ford by International and powerstrokes designed and built 'in-house'.

since at least 2010 the diesel ford uses is their own design and build, now producing over 900 tarks .

I bet it will be over 1000ftlbs in a couple of years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sinbad,

 

The late model 6.7 engine has been very reliable so far other than the exhaust temp sensors which are covered under an extended warranty. I do agree the 6.0 and 6.4 engines are not that reliable until they have some work done to them however

I have heard that about the 6.7 but I have been out of the auto industry for about 6 years now and don't follow it as much as I used to. I believe that if you have to "bulletproof" your engine (6.0 and 6.4) before you can put any HP/TQ to it, your engine manufacturer is doing something wrong.

 

Armyret, Good to hear, hopefully you will have years and many miles of reliable use out of that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have to remember that in some cases in towing that much, a CDL will be required for that weight. Also, it's still a Powerstroke, don't trust any of those engines, too many problems. I would stick with the Cummins. I looked at the 5500 before buying the Volvo. Couldn't find one that didn't look like it was excessively abused for under $30k. Paid less than that for the Volvo.

Weight doesn't require a CDL, commercial use does that. Some but not all states require a different class license based on weight.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We had a 2011 ford 6.7L F350 and found out that Ford won't honor the warranty. at 62K miles we started to have injector problems after paying for 2 injectors at $2,000 a pop and Ford would not honor their warranty we traded for a new Ram and have not been happier....

I'm curious about your statement. Did Ford deny a warranty claim? Were you within the miles and time? I don't see how they could deny an injector claim if you were???

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have to remember that in some cases in towing that much, a CDL will be required for that weight. Also, it's still a Powerstroke, don't trust any of those engines, too many problems. I would stick with the Cummins. I looked at the 5500 before buying the Volvo. Couldn't find one that didn't look like it was excessively abused for under $30k. Paid less than that for the Volvo.

Trailer over 10k requires a higher class of license, Class A. In some states, that means CDL. In other states, it just means a Class A license instead of a Class C (vehicle <26k, trailer <10k).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

real truck engines have 6 cylinders and no sparkplugs. the small V8 diesels are turned up and spun to fast to be reliable long term.

The "small V8 diesels" don't have spark plugs either. My 7.3L Powerstroke V8 is doing fine with 227k on it, which is no small engine next to a Dodge/Cummins 5.9L.

 

Something to be said for V8 versus I/V6: peak/instantaneous torque of an 8-cylinder is lower than a 6-cylinder, as an 8 only has to propel the crankshaft an average of 90 degrees per combustion event, whereas a 6 has to propel the crankshaft an average of 120 degrees per combustion event. I've heard this has created challenges for the transmissions behind Dodge/Cummins engines (though admittedly I've had to replace my transmission twice...).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Original 5.9 Cummins were detuned to reduce torque on the trannies. Of course smart guys noticed and said "whats this BS" and brought them back to the "standard" rating or beyond. Next thing you know, you are in the trannie shop with a blown one. Then the smart guys said "this is BS too" and came out with kits and methods how to bullet proof the trannies to take the additional (unplanned for) torque. This is not the first time the plenty of money was made on lack of foresight, incompetence, or stupidity by big companies. Pick one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Original 5.9 Cummins were detuned to reduce torque on the trannies. Of course smart guys noticed and said "whats this BS" and brought them back to the "standard" rating or beyond. Next thing you know, you are in the trannie shop with a blown one. Then the smart guys said "this is BS too" and came out with kits and methods how to bullet proof the trannies to take the additional (unplanned for) torque. This is not the first time the plenty of money was made on lack of foresight, incompetence, or stupidity by big companies. Pick one.

 

Henry,

 

You old-goat.....your "KNEE-JERK" reaction must indicate that the New-Knees are ....Up & Running ......just fine.....

 

Ok....OK....back the regularly scheduled topic of the post........I just could not pass up the ......the Knee-comment....

 

On the topic of injectors, the Dollytrolley came into the family with a fair size box of spare parts and a new injector at $288.78 plus $11.61 frt was included in the spares.......it takes about 4 hours for a slow mechanic to drop a new injector into a Cummins M11 so it looks like $600 or $700 gets you a new injector & installed.........of course the first run-out on the M11 went 1,018,936 mile without any need of the spare injector so maybe I might just pickle the injector and have it cyro-preserved..........

 

Someday maybe cheep old me might strike it rich and get me one of those newer super-pickups........just never been that mad at my money yet......

 

Drive on..........(What rating....matters today)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dolly, there is a rich storehouse of anecdotes, critical notes and other things ready to share in this 72 years old brain and you are right sometimes they come out in a knee-jerk fashion. It could be that these being

Knees%2B4.JPG

were very recently manipulated by an aggressive PT processional, invariably put me into very choleric disposition.

But there is stored knowledge I attained in my callow youth which has to do with Fords, Allisons, 5.9 Cummins, International and 7.2 Internationals. The learning process was long, painful attained in small steps.

Having "graduated beyond pickups there was this.

011a.jpg

 

Birthed as Ford E-350 diesel, converted to a Cabriolet puller, converted once more by some yahoos in White Pigeon Michigan. Ford diesel and tranny was removed replaced by 5.9 Cummins coupled to a school bus (removed from) Allison 4 speed and external electronic two speed box (to raise the RPMs the rear end saw). We renamed it a Beast, an owner of another renamed his a Belzebub! That's a clue! Here I am rewiring the Beast, why it didn't catch on fire was a miracle.

You can see how far into the cab the 6 cylinder in-line 5.9 was projecting. A custom fiberglass hump cover was fabricated by the yahoos in White Pigeon to deal with the projection.

011c.jpg

After rewiring a custom dashboard was created.

011b.jpg

After the Beast we were introduced to the International products.

012.jpg

This one had that legendary 7.2 diesel V-8, coupled to a 4 speed Allison. Pretty standard you might say, however, it is neither in mine nor my wife's personality profile to own something that is straightforward or "normal".

014.jpg

This one came with propane fuel injection on that 7.2, hence that big ass propane tank in the back. The system worked like a charm for climbing long hills or passing on flats. 1600 mile trip from NH to FL required one propane fill-up on the way down and another on the way up.

The knowledge acquired to deal with both trucks was attained before the Big Three have undertaken the projects to manufacture their own diesel pickup. I was beyond the pickup phase by then and observed the fits and starts and disasters by Ford, Dodge and Chevy with amusement and bemusement. If I was still in the pickup phase then, I know I wouldn't be amused.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...