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Receiver Hitch for 780


VegasFlyer

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Drop down 2 sections of steel from chassis, 45 degree back from bottom to chassis. Tube steel at bottom and weld receiver on. Dress it up with a bumper would look better. Bolt to Chassis. Probably all holes there. Would add cross steel between rails at mounting point to take any stress off it. Nothing complicated for any shop. Or you if you have the welding skills.

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Drop down 2 sections of steel from chassis, 45 degree back from bottom to chassis. Tube steel at bottom and weld receiver on. Dress it up with a bumper would look better. Bolt to Chassis. Probably all holes there. Would add cross steel between rails at mounting point to take any stress off it. Nothing complicated for any shop. Or you if you have the welding skills.

Thanks for the info Glenn...

 

I probably should have given more info. We are nearly done with having a pre buy inspection and Dyno for a 780. Along with bringing the truck home, we may stop off to buy a 24 foot enclosed car trailer.

 

If that happens, we will need to put a hitch on the truck.

 

If We had the truck already here, fabricating something would not be hard at all.

 

We are thinking that if there is already a bolt on Class V that can be bought and shipped to the truck, we could put that on when we pick the truck up.

 

John

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Thanks for the info Glenn...

 

I probably should have given more info. We are nearly done with having a pre buy inspection and Dyno for a 780. Along with bringing the truck home, we may stop off to buy a 24 foot enclosed car trailer.

 

If that happens, we will need to put a hitch on the truck.

 

If We had the truck already here, fabricating something would not be hard at all.

 

We are thinking that if there is already a bolt on Class V that can be bought and shipped to the truck, we could put that on when we pick the truck up.

 

John

 

John,

 

When we bought the old Freightshaker it had a very lightweight 12 ft long wood bed and a std issue RV 5th hitch on a 1/2" plate bolted between the frame rails .........about as simple as a 5th RV toter gets but it had no std receiver hitch.

 

I looked online and did not find anything that made sense.

 

Too many moons ago in S. America we had a old unimog truck and a "local" made trailer that had the tanker section of a old two-fuel airport refueler cobbled on it (3rd world rig, you know the drill). The advantage was that least the old fuel tanker section had moisture traps and some filters and we did not have to fuel from drums .......

 

Anyhow the unimog needed a conventional trailer hitch so I sorted through the bone yard and found a old truck frame section and I had some of the local labor hack saw (we had plenty of Ox but was out of map gas.....3rd world....) the frame into three sections ....two sections bolted down from the unimog frame rails and the bottom hitch was formed from the third channel section bolted between the two-drop-down-channel-sections that were bolted to the unimog frame rails.......we used 2 x 2 x 1/4 angle sections to joint bolt the bottom channel section to the two vertical channel sections.......

 

We had a OLD torpedo-welder but no welding rod (3rd world....) the local electrical service only seemed to work during siesta and some 'Happy-hours" so I marked all of the bolt holes and most holes were drilled with a OLD .....VERY OLD.....spanish built HAND CRANK drill press (Very 3rd world...).....the final touch of putting the lipstick-on-the-pig was that the entire hitch was bolted together with AN and P&W engine high tol hardware that cost more that the entire rig was worth (Very 3rd world).......

 

The jest of it was that it worked well (not often the case in the 3rd world)....

 

Our 30 ft toy hauler is a conventional TT hitch with a 2 5/16 ball with a level height of 18 inches.

 

So I went down to the local steel yard and had them cut:

 

(2) pieces 1/2" X 8" X 22" long HRFB (Hot Rolled Flat Bar)

 

(1) piece 8" X 34" or 32" long (depending on your frame width) , 30 Lb Ship Channel (30 pounds per foot length)

 

(4) pieces of 2" X 2" X 3/16" angle 7" long each

 

(1) 12" long special square tube for receiver hitch insertion (Wilco farm stores or hitch shops)

 

(24) 1/2" X 1 1/2" long grade 5 capscrews

 

(27) 1/2 " heavy Flat washers

 

(24) 1/2" NC Nylock nuts

 

(3) 1/2" X 4" long grade 8 SAE Capscrews

 

(3) 1/2" SAE Grade 8 Nylock nuts

 

VERY IMPORTANT.........buy your wife a NEW anniversary present .........Heavy Duty 1/2" Dewalt 18V drill WITH TWO batteries AND the two battery charger.

 

Next........have wife drill SIXTYFOUR 1/2" holes in all of the steel (the frame rails are real fun) and then help the wife bolt it together.....

 

Have her Lawyer send me some pics of her new hitch.......

 

If you would like to see the hitch send me a email to mmcdan3189@aol.com and I will send you a few pics via return email.....

 

The 3rd world hitch was easy........the gringo (me).... waved my arms...... and the "locals" did all the work.....(very 3rd world).....

 

Drive on.........(Bring the wife some cool drinks while she is drilling too many holes.....)

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This would work--just have them drill holes thru the upright brackets to match hole in the truck frame, and then weld it together. a 11.5" drop and up to 60" across the frames.

 

http://www.curtmfg.com/part/15903 Instructions: https://www.curtmfg.com/masterlibrary/15903/installsheet/CM_15903_INS.PDF

 

FOr pulling an empty trailer that would be totally adequate. Add 2 diagonal braces up from the tube to the frame rails later and you would have a good permanent hitch.

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I've seen Penske run thick flatbar across the inside bottom of the frame rail, and smaller pieces on the bottom with bolts to sandwich it together, then a receiver hitch welded to the bottom of the plate.

But that's for very temporary use for pulling a pick up on a towbar when shuttling trucks between dealers. Not something I would recommend for that much weight.

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Don't know of anything that is a simple bolt on. Frame rails are like 40" high. Way too high for the receiver.

I've seen

 

Penske run thick flatbar across the inside bottom of the frame rail, and smaller pieces on the bottom with bolts to sandwich it together, then a receiver hitch welded to the bottom of the plate.

But that's for very temporary use for pulling a pick up on a towbar when shuttling trucks between dealers. Not something I would recommend for that much weight.

Glenn and Bronc are right,

 

All kidding aside the quick hitch that I cobbled together has withstood plenty of testing without a wimper .......

 

After I finished the install I wondered down to the steel yard and slipped Paco a ten spot to give the hitch test with the rail car big boy fork lift.....he picked up the 40k ballast block and bounced the fork tip on to top of the ball and the Dolly front tires were just about to lift off the ground.......then he pushed Dolly forward and back with the brakes locked .........I pulled the hitch to frame bolts and saw no stress marks but being a chicken geezer I put in new bolts.......

 

I have towed my Bobcat and mini excavator on a flatbed Loadking trailer over a few hundred of pretty steep curves Oregon roads with a 8,100 lb hitch load with no problem as well as several thousand miles tugging the toyhauler....

 

You could cobble one of these hitches for about $100 ( your wife's lawyer fees might be a bit more) and then just take the hitch with you and then drill the last few hitch to frame holes to match some of the holes likely already in the truck frame......

 

Worked for us.....

 

One thing that I would recommend would be a 1/2 " impact gun........+60 nuts to tighten is a bit much by hand.

 

Drive on..........(Hitch......on)

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Perhaps I might add a additional two cents worth of thought here......

 

The MAIN design you should be concerned with your hitch placement on a HDT is that trailer weight might be a factor in a pickup trailer hitch design but this is actually a fairly minor design factor when dealing with a HDT hitch.......a HDT can input far greater stress into a hitch than any pickup can ever do......

 

Even the tiny M11 in the Dollytrolley has far more torque at fast idle than the top of line Ram 3500 has at wide open throttle and of course with EIGHT huge tandem drivers with 17,000 lbs on them the Dolly can give any LGT super pickup hitch real heartburn......sure your trailer might not be too heavy but a HDT can impart huge shock loads without too much throttle movement at all.

 

Consider Glenn statement about vertical drop my hitch drop is about 20" below the truck frame and that is a huge torque arm with a 10,000 pound shock load......

 

There is a good reason that you can not find prebuilt HDT receiver hitches.....they would likely be very heavy to ship and not cheap to build and sell.......and insure.....

 

HDT stress are something to ponder.....

 

Drive on........(Oh honey, sorry my foot slipped off the.......clutch)

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John,

 

When we bought the old Freightshaker it had a very lightweight 12 ft long wood bed and a std issue RV 5th hitch on a 1/2" plate bolted between the frame rails .........about as simple as a 5th RV toter gets but it had no std receiver hitch.

 

I looked online and did not find anything that made sense.

 

Too many moons ago in S. America we had a old unimog truck and a "local" made trailer that had the tanker section of a old two-fuel airport refueler cobbled on it (3rd world rig, you know the drill). The advantage was that least the old fuel tanker section had moisture traps and some filters and we did not have to fuel from drums .......

 

Anyhow the unimog needed a conventional trailer hitch so I sorted through the bone yard and found a old truck frame section and I had some of the local labor hack saw (we had plenty of Ox but was out of map gas.....3rd world....) the frame into three sections ....two sections bolted down from the unimog frame rails and the bottom hitch was formed from the third channel section bolted between the two-drop-down-channel-sections that were bolted to the unimog frame rails.......we used 2 x 2 x 1/4 angle sections to joint bolt the bottom channel section to the two vertical channel sections.......

 

We had a OLD torpedo-welder but no welding rod (3rd world....) the local electrical service only seemed to work during siesta and some 'Happy-hours" so I marked all of the bolt holes and most holes were drilled with a OLD .....VERY OLD.....spanish built HAND CRANK drill press (Very 3rd world...).....the final touch of putting the lipstick-on-the-pig was that the entire hitch was bolted together with AN and P&W engine high tol hardware that cost more that the entire rig was worth (Very 3rd world).......

 

The jest of it was that it worked well (not often the case in the 3rd world)....

 

Our 30 ft toy hauler is a conventional TT hitch with a 2 5/16 ball with a level height of 18 inches.

 

So I went down to the local steel yard and had them cut:

 

(2) pieces 1/2" X 8" X 22" long HRFB (Hot Rolled Flat Bar)

 

(1) piece 8" X 32" long , 30 Lb Ship Channel (30 pounds per foot length)

 

(4) pieces of 2" X 2" X 3/16" angle 7" long each

 

(1) 12" long special square tube for receiver hitch insertion (Wilco farm stores or hitch shops)

 

(24) 1/2" X 1 1/2" long grade 5 capscrews

 

(27) 1/2 " heavy Flat washers

 

(24) 1/2" NC Nylock nuts

 

(3) 1/2" X 4" long grade 8 SAE Capscrews

 

(3) 1/2" SAE Grade 8 Nylock nuts

 

VERY IMPORTANT.........buy your wife a NEW anniversary present .........Heavy Duty 1/2" Dewalt 18V drill WITH TWO batteries AND the two battery charger.

 

Next........have wife drill SIXTYFOUR 1/2" holes in all of the steel (the frame rails are real fun) and then help the wife bolt it together.....

 

Have her Lawyer send me some pics of her new hitch.......

 

If you would like to see the hitch send me a email to mmcdan3189@aol.com and I will send you a few pics via return email.....

 

The 3rd world hitch was easy........the gringo (me).... waved my arms...... and the "locals" did all the work.....(very 3rd world).....

 

Drive on.........(Bring the wife some cool drinks while she is drilling too many holes.....)

 

Lol.....Dolley if I did'nt know better I would say that it looks like you started typing a post and at the same time, started sipping on some fermented mash made from Dolly's grain...... Then again, I don't know better!

 

Thanks for the recipe.

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This would work--just have them drill holes thru the upright brackets to match hole in the truck frame, and then weld it together. a 11.5" drop and up to 60" across the frames.

 

http://www.curtmfg.com/part/15903 Instructions: https://www.curtmfg.com/masterlibrary/15903/installsheet/CM_15903_INS.PDF

 

FOr pulling an empty trailer that would be totally adequate. Add 2 diagonal braces up from the tube to the frame rails later and you would have a good permanent hitch.

Jeff,

 

Thanks, I did see that and it may wind up being what I wind up going with, though I was hoping to find something that does not require welding.

 

The biggest obstacle is that most of the heavy duty pre-built hitches that are adjustable, are for 34 to 35" frames and according to the Volvo Bodybuilder book, the 780 has a frame that is 32.9".

 

Then again, with the prices of some of the bolt together units, it may pay researching a fabricator.

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I've seen Penske run thick flatbar across the inside bottom of the frame rail, and smaller pieces on the bottom with bolts to sandwich it together, then a receiver hitch welded to the bottom of the plate.

But that's for very temporary use for pulling a pick up on a towbar when shuttling trucks between dealers. Not something I would recommend for that much weight.

Bronco,

 

Thanks,

 

I did see a couple variations of that hitch on YouTube, you are right in that looks fairly simple and fast to setup.

 

You are also right on the cringe factor of towing that sort of weight with that setup. Especially since we may be throwing a new rzr in the back on the way home.

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I just installed the Draw-tite equivalent to the Curt mentioned by Jeff above on my Argosy. rated for 1200# tongue and 16K trailer weight. Installation took about 2 hours, hardest thing was drilling the holes in the frame. The certified welder who put it on just used his easy stick to cut those holes, he was as good as the drill. the only welding is where the cross piece to the drop pieces. Any welding shop can do that for you. Cheap, about $200 for the hitch and about $200 for installation.

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Lol.....Dolley if I did'nt know better I would say that it looks like you started typing a post and at the same time, started sipping on some fermented mash made from Dolly's grain...... Then again, I don't know better!

 

Thanks for the recipe.

 

Good morning Vegas,

 

Unfortunately I was stone-cold-sober when i cobbled up the hitch........but perhaps a few "nips" might just make the project seem a bit more 'relaxing"....

 

All kidding aside any fab shop could punch the holes in less than a hour and in fact I shot some extra holes in the vertical plates so that I can raise and lower the ball height to any level from 8" to 28" above the ground.

 

This hitch is stone simple and is up to the stress's of a HDT .

 

It weighs about 100 lbs so the down side would be shipping it if needed ( you could just ship UPS in two packages).

 

Shoot me a email is you want to see some pics ......mmcdan3189@aol.com

 

Drive on........(Hitch with......care......sober)

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  • 11 months later...

I know this is an old post but I came across it while searching for a hitch myself.  For future, the Draw-Tite part number is 41991 and it can be had with either 7" or 16" side plates.  The 7" part number is 4907 and the 16" part number is 4916.  

The 16" kit sells for roughly $205 but if you buy the plates and tube separately (how they're packaged in the kit anyway), the setup runs roughly $170 ($98 for the receiver tube and $72 for the side plates) from Amazon.

If you'd like to save even more, get the full kit (part # 41991-07) that has 7" side plates for $130 and just weld on a longer extension plate....$72 seems kinda ridiculous for a 16" plate..

Hope this information helps the next person looking for a HDT receiver hitch!

Edit: I bought the receiver tube today, Dec. 13, and it was $84 on Amazon.

 

rid267715_r1_800.jpg

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