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CABLE TV AND SATELLITE INPUTS


K5RCD
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I recently purchased a new Coachmen Freedom Express trailer.

 

I am trying to figure out how to bring both satellite and cable television into the trailer at the same time, without having to go outside and unhook the coax from one or the other, and switch them around to watch either cable or satellite. The rig will be spending most of the time stationary in a campground at Rockport Texas, with an occasional road trip. I like having both services available. I don't want to drill any holes in the trailer.

 

I have a Dish VIP 211K sat receiver, and a Cable One cable box inside the trailer. Both are connected to the television via separate HDMI.

 

The trailer has the following connections outside: On the road side of the unit is a single input labeled "cable / satellite". That one brings either satellite or cable into the trailer, depending on which is hooked up On the curb side, is a connector labeled "cable TV". As I understand it, that one is for watching TV while sitting outside under the awning.

 

Inside the trailer is a connector in the entertainment center that is wired to the outside input jack on the road side. I have tried it on both satellite and cable and it works on either, but of course only on one or the other, depending on which is connected to that outside connector and whichever box is attached to that inside connector. Also inside is the separate connector for over the air antenna reception with signal amplifier, but only the one inside connector for either cable or satellite. In addition, there is a connector in the bedroom ceiling for mounting a second television.

 

I am unable to see how these cables all interface. Is there some way I can use the jack on the curb side to bring either the sat or cable signal into the trailer? I don't know how or where that coax feeds.

 

I have thought of installing an A/B switch outside and another inside and switching both to cable when I want to watch cable, and to satellite when I want to watch the sat. HOWEVER, I am afraid I will forget to switch one or the other, and end up connecting the cable box to the satellite dish, or vice versa. I am thinking that could damage the cable box and or the satellite receiver or satellite dish. Simple splitters would likely cause the same problem.

 

I hope I have explained this clearly.

 

Any ideas of what I need to do to accomplish this will be appreciated.

 

Help Mr. Wizard !

 

 

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This worked for me when I had a problem with the main cable inlet.

 

Since you know where the curb side cable outlet goes on the inside, you can use that outlet can as an inlet, so hook up satellite to the satellite connection on the road side, and cable into the curb side outlet.

 

Just be sure it is a clean connection on the curb side, for example it doesn't go through a booster or anything like that. More than likely it doesn't, but be sure so you don't create any problems.

 

Can't offer anything about how to interface all of it though without seeing it. Splitters and things can be used; you just have to figure out what goes where. You could probably use an A/B switch so you don't have to keep hooking and unhooking cable to the back of your tv, but every connection causes signal loss.

 

Nothing says the signal can't go both ways through a wire; it's not electrical. Good luck.

Edited by tinstartrvlr
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My Winnebago came with one coax inlet. There is a switch box in a front cabinet to select between satellite, catv, or OTA antenna. I have used the coax inlet for both catv and satellite at the same time. At the inlet point, I added a "power pass one side diplexer." Kind of like a splitter, but it MUST pass power on the satellite side. Then behind the switch box up front I used the same type diplexer to split the catv and satellite signals for their separate coax with satellite coax going to the sat box and then to the switch box, and catv coax going directly into the switch box. It worked great, even such that I could watch satellite on the bedroom TV while DW watched catv on the lounge tv.

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  • 3 weeks later...

My Winnebago came with one coax inlet. There is a switch box in a front cabinet to select between satellite, catv, or OTA antenna. I have used the coax inlet for both catv and satellite at the same time. At the inlet point, I added a "power pass one side diplexer." Kind of like a splitter, but it MUST pass power on the satellite side. Then behind the switch box up front I used the same type diplexer to split the catv and satellite signals for their separate coax with satellite coax going to the sat box and then to the switch box, and catv coax going directly into the switch box. It worked great, even such that I could watch satellite on the bedroom TV while DW watched catv on the lounge tv.

 

Thanks:

 

I purchased a pair of power pass diplexers and it is working fine.

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  • 3 years later...

I would use the road side to connect your sat, which uses the coax for power, and the curb side for cable. Hook up the cable from the road side to your sat receiver, the 211. Hook up the coax from the curb side to your cable box. Run an HDMI cable from the sat box to a HDMI slot on your TV. Hook up a coax cable from your 211 to the coax connector on your TV. When you want to watch sat, go on the menu/imput setting on your TV and choose HDMI as the imput. When you want to watch cable, choose cable as the imput. In theory this should work. No A/B switch is required because you TV is switching from one imput to another. Of course this assumes that the cable connector on the curb side goes to the inside of your RV and dies not just go to the outside TV. 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Why make it so complicated? Forget about cable TV and switch to streaming. You will pay three times less for this than for cable TV. I did so as soon as I found out at yourmoneygeek.com about alternatives to cable television. This was my best decision in the last few years. I have no restrictions on viewing and also no annoying ads. This is the perfect solution in terms of money and quality. Soon I want to transfer my parents to streaming. I think they will be happy

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7 hours ago, HelenMachine said:

Why make it so complicated? Forget about cable TV and switch to streaming. You will pay three times less for this than for cable TV. I did so as soon as I found out at yourmoneygeek.com about alternatives to cable television. This was my best decision in the last few years. I have no restrictions on viewing and also no annoying ads. This is the perfect solution in terms of money and quality. Soon I want to transfer my parents to streaming. I think they will be happy

Streaming will not work unless you have a decent cell signal and loads of data.

Ken

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"Loads of data" can be obtained from a Visible (Verizon) mobile phone hotspot.  Their $19 Visible R2 phone is out of stock but you can get a ZTE Blade A7 phone for $49 or free if you trade in a working phone.  Then pay $25-40 a month for unlimited everything - phone calls, text, data and hotspot.

Nothing says you have to actually use it as a phone.  Don't give out the number and just use the unlimited data and hotspot.

Edited by Lou Schneider
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