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Just starting out 2 babies 2 kitties and a house to sell


Ripplesinmytea

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Hi!

 

I thought it would be useful to be on a forum for living in rvs. I have had the plan in place for over 6 months and now its REALLY HAPPENING. Currently, it is me my partner (husband), 2 babies (1&2), 2 kitties, and a ton of stuff in a 3 bed room 1400 sq ft home that we have lived in for 5 years. We bought it cheap and are ready to sell and make some $$$$. The house is old,1850, and has needed a lot of work and we are done procrastinating and getting it all done! We will be listing it at the end of March and hoping it goes soon. Currently living in Michigan, but will be heading to North Carolina.

 

I don't have a trailer yet or a tow vehicle! ? We are planning to stay in the in laws yard/house while our house is listed so I am not too worried. I am really picky about the layout because I want it to be functional for my family. I need queen bedroom, a small rv bath for babies, a bunk bed space or a space where I can build them, and a galley kitchen. Not looking for anything fancy just in good condition. Oh yea my budget - $2000. Which me luck ?

 

Anyone stay in the Durham, NC area? We plan on staying in the RV park by Duke and will be working at the hospital. I am also trying to get an idea of the feeling of community in an RV park. I was hoping everyone will be amazing and we could trade child care or even put activities together for kids. Does this happen? Are there pot lucks? Are there a lot of younger people? We are 29&30.

 

I can't wait to explore! I also can't wait to get off work and cook on a fire! So excited! Any advice for us would be amazing. Thanks

 

Ap

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Most of the rv parks we have been in do not have many children. Some on weekends, but most parents work during the week. Of course there are some seasonals during the summer where mom & kids stay and dad goes to work coming back either evenings or weekends. In the winter, I would think most would be snowbirds with just occasional visits from grandchildren or family. Many of the parks do have potlucks. As far as trading childcare - maybe, but I wouldn't count on it. Most campers are not around long enough to get to know them well, and I for one would never allow someone I didn't know well to watch my children. As far as getting off work and cooking on a fire -- buy a firepit ring for your backyard and you can do that now.

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Thanks for the reply! As far as child care I meant people that stayed for a while that we got to know. I am looking to get an idea of the people that are in rv parks, which sounds silly but I am excited. Do you get to know the park hosts or are there ever any other people full time that you get to know? Currently, I live in city limits and we cannot have a fire. :( Do most rv spots have a fire ring?

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You need to do a lot more reading about the Rving life style and get your feet on the ground a bit. Visit a local RV Park to get a feel, talk to people, try to find some people in parks that are doing what your are doing. Many people have done this successfully with their families, including home schooling of the children.

 

Search the internet, there may be some sites more specific to the life style you are hoping to attain.

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Budget of $2000? I'm hoping that's a typo. I would suggest you slow down and do a lot of research before you commit to this lifestyle. It's not for everyone. On the surface it sounds great, but there's pitfalls. Are you prepared to be stuck inside during a spell of bad weather with two little ones? Or not having a yard to speak of where they can go out and play. Some Rver's won't be too thrilled having children playing around their coach. It's a pretty transient lifestyle with people coming and going all the time. You might want to look into a mobile home park where people are more permanent.

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Welcome to the Escapee forums! We are happy to welcome new folks to the forums and we will do everything that we are able to assist you and support you in your new adventure. I'll try to respond to some of what you are asking and also point you to some sources for more information that I believe will be helpful.

 

The first thing that I am going to suggest is a couple of websites that are aimed at young families who live in RVs. We are an RV group that does include younger families, but the majority of us are much older than you and no longer have children living with us. At present there is a major effort in our club to expand our younger membership and you are exactly the sort of folks we hope to attract, so please do stick around and take part in the forums and also visit the internet side which is provided for the younger RV folks. It is called the X-Scapers and is a part of the Escapee's RV Club just as these forums are, but is more oriented to the younger RVer. In addition to our forums which are probably as good as you will find in the areas of RVs and RV living, I suggest you visit some of the sites that are aimed at traveling families as they probably can share ideas with you that most of us are not current on. I'm thinking of Families on the Road, and of Fulltime Families, and another is the Newschool Nomads, any of which will be able to provide you with some information that we may not have. You will find a great deal of experience and sound advice here about RVs, RV living, and selecting a good RV so join into these forums often and ask questions.

 

I don't have a trailer yet or a tow vehicle! ................................. Not looking for anything fancy just in good condition. Oh yea my budget - $2000.

Am I correct in assuming that you are quoting a budget for the travel trailer and have another to buy the tow truck? There are a lot of RV choices and many different trailers of motorized RVs but very few that would be sound for use as a long term home for a family of 4 which do not cost much more than your budget. An RV today is very much like a small house on wheels and as such they are usually fairly large vehicles and they are heavy so require a lager and mechanically sound tow vehicle. I suggest that you start now to spend some time visiting nearby RV dealerships and just walking through the various choices for sale there to get a feel for just what is available and for the prices of them. If there happens to be an RV show anywhere near you, do take the family to it and spend time in all sorts of RV to better realize the space available and what you will need in order to live comfortably in an RV. Imagine your family living in them and going through the daily necessities and especially so on days when weather is bad and you must stay indoors.

 

With the size budget you have you will be looking at the older RVs and since an RV does wear out, you need to learn what makes and models will be of sound construction and high quality in order to find one that will stand up to daily living and not be in constant need of repair or replacement. RV living can be quite frugal if your RV is sound and durable, but it can also be a financial disaster if you get one that does not withstand the constant use. Lower priced RVs are not designed to last with constant use but are only intended for vacations and weekends so do not have the durability to survive year around use. The selection and quality of RV needed is a subject that these forums can give you a great deal of advice and guidance in. You also want an RV/truck combination that will be safe for you and your family to travel in and RVing safety is a very well understood subject on these forums.

 

I am also trying to get an idea of the feeling of community in an RV park. I was hoping everyone will be amazing and we could trade child care or even put activities together for kids. Does this happen? Are there pot lucks? Are there a lot of younger people?

The folks that are found in most RV parks tend to be a very friendly lot, particularly those in the parks where most people travel extensively. While there are working folks and families in the RV community, most of those in the parks you see along the highways during times when schools are in session will be those of us whose children are grown or who have no children. There is a growing population of families who home-school and work while traveling and we do have some members doing this, but most RV parks will not have many of them. There are more families in the construction trades and mineral industry than most other jobs so you will also find more families in parks where there are many of these workers. As far as potluck meals, those are quite common in most of the traveling RV parks but not so much in most of those that are construction workers, although they do happen. Child care is a subject that most of us here are probably a bit out of touch with, so perhaps one of our members who are traveling families can address that for you. We have only traveled with grandchildren and then for relatively short periods and so haven't used or sought childcare. Younger folks are not the majority in most RV parks but there are some out there so you will need to watch for them. You will also find younger families in the state/national parks on weekends and in summer.

 

. I am looking to get an idea of the people that are in rv parks, which sounds silly but I am excited. Do you get to know the park hosts or are there ever any other people full time that you get to know?

RV folks do tend to be very friendly and outward going so you probably won't have much difficulty in meeting others as you travel. Park hosts in commercial RV parks are working for income in most cases and will be friendly but very few will have children. Most public park campgrounds today also have park hosts who usually are unpaid volunteers who do limited amounts of work in return for their RV site only and most are primarily there to answer questions and to be a presence in the campground for the paid staff. We have done a lot of that sort of thing in public campgrounds and enjoy doing so, but only recall two times finding a family as a campground host in a state or national park.

 

Let me suggest that you need to do a lot of research on this lifestyle before you get too far into this. It can be done with a family and there are others doing this but you do need to educate yourself before you choose an RV and head out on the road. You will probably find it to be helpful to visit some of the websites that many of us who contribute here maintain. There is a lot of free information on a wide range of subjects to be found in them. Just look for links in the signature lines of those who post here and I'd invite you to start that process by visiting mine. You have a long way to go, but you can do this if you prepare properly! Welcome to the road!

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Yep $2000. ;) Looking for a used working older travel trailer. After our house sells i can afford a new truck to tow. We will also have money to find a home/land to purchase once we move out of state. We don't want to rush on finding the perfect property, so we will be living in travel trailer until we find something. We may even buy cheap houses to fix up and sell. We will be most likely traveling exploring on the weekends and during holiday breaks coming back to michigan to visit family. Thank you for all the helpful links! I have read reviews on the rv park we were planning on staying at and they arent very good. Thankfully there are a few more in the area that look amazing. We don't really know how everything is going to go exactly. For sure my partner will have a job in durham and i have a few close friends there. If we decide we don't like full time we will have option of buying house/property or renting, but i would love to still stay in the trailer as much as i can.

 

As far as the kids go, i was planning on having a lot of outdoor play areas/toys outside of trailer. This lifestyle is a way for us to be outside and be more active. They/we will be outside unless we are sleeping or bad weather. We have already done a lot of tent camping with them and are not worried about that. Hopefully we get good rv nieghbors or we can always move spots/parks.

 

We will be finding a house/residence for sure when the kids get into school. We are just unsure of where we want to live.

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There can be many issues with older rv's that need to be considered. Sometimes even with brand new one's with a warranty. One thing to be considered right off the get-go before even buying is the roof on older models. Look into what it will cost to repair or replace a roof even if you are able to do the labor yourself. The materials alone can be expensive. I don't want to discourage you but definitly do your reading and research before you jump in with both feet.

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I have been to that RV park in Durham; it is not typical. A lot of people stay there while getting medical treatments so it is not your typical RV neighbors. But the people I met there were wonderful! You might well find the spouse of someone getting treatment would love to watch your kids for awhile to remind themselves of what healthy feels like or to help them fight homesickness for their own grandkids. Staff has a great sense of humor--the guy mowing was suggesting they level the ground in that area so the grass would all look the same height and others were teasing him right back. I was only there to do a dump and fill since I was actually living in a nearby parking lot at the time but I would go back to that park in a minute if I wanted to live in the area. Visiting other RV parks is not going to give you a sense of this one.

 

Linda Sand

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Yep $2000. ;) Looking for a used working older travel trailer. After our house sells i can afford a new truck to tow. We will also have money to find a home/land to purchase once we move out of state. We don't want to rush on finding the perfect property, so we will be living in travel trailer until we find something. We may even buy cheap houses to fix up and sell. We will be most likely traveling exploring on the weekends and during holiday breaks coming back to michigan to visit family. Thank you for all the helpful links! I have read reviews on the rv park we were planning on staying at and they arent very good. Thankfully there are a few more in the area that look amazing. We don't really know how everything is going to go exactly. For sure my partner will have a job in durham and i have a few close friends there. If we decide we don't like full time we will have option of buying house/property or renting, but i would love to still stay in the trailer as much as i can.

As far as the kids go, i was planning on having a lot of outdoor play areas/toys outside of trailer. This lifestyle is a way for us to be outside and be more active. They/we will be outside unless we are sleeping or bad weather. We have already done a lot of tent camping with them and are not worried about that. Hopefully we get good rv nieghbors or we can always move spots/parks.

We will be finding a house/residence for sure when the kids get into school. We are just unsure of where we want to live.

Why not just buy a used truck so you can have a better trailer? Maybe a used yurt might fit what your looking for?

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Any trailer you buy used at that price(if you can even find one) will need extensive work. Roof, recaulk, tires as a starting point. Basic trailer supplies, hoses, surge protectors, extension cords, water filters etc.

 

You talk about toys, remember you need to store them someplace when traveling or if a storm comes up.

 

A budget of $2000 for all this is pie in the sky. You need to do some research and settle down to reality.

 

I admire your future hopes but you need to look at reality.

 

Also, you are thinking your house will sell reasonably fast. Only a limited population would be interested in an 1850's house.

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I will keep in mind that full time retired rvers aren't the most optomistic people.

Aw, don't let them shoot your balloon out of the sky. I received a lot of the same guff when I first started posting our idea about our family of eight fulltiming around the country. There were a lot of naysayers, and a direct quote: "It'll never work." But I'm happy to report that not only did we prove the naysayers wrong, we had a blast doing it! And I'm sure you can find a way to make your dream work for you, too!

 

All that said, don't discount the advice given here. These people are a goldmine of experienced travelers. And yes, do TONS of research before you get started. I know you have to start somewhere, and it sounds to me like you are moving in the right direction. Keep asking questions, and keep learning!

 

Best wishes! I think it sounds fun!

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I would say that varies by the person. At the same time we have a lot of experience that is useful and can save you mucho problemo's. We mostly mean to be very helpful but are not always subtle about it. But subtle is not always everything it is cracked up to be. We even save each other from mistakes sometimes. For example sitting in this same spot 2 years ago about this time of year I went on this site for help and was led to a diagnosis of refrigerator failure. FYI, replacing an RV refrigerator can be very expensive. I am still shedding aligator tears over mine because I am so cheap. :) When I first started I had no experience and I could not use a computer at all therefor I learned plenty the hard way.

 

The more I think about it I would say most of us are extremely optomistic or we would never have hit the road.

 

My first trailer was almost 20 years old and looked real good for its age. It had a metal roof which I thought was cool and would be almost trouble free. Well I learned some lessons about that the hard way. I paid $4k for it.(the trailer)

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Older folks are all about reducing risks and having all the contingencies accounted for. I'm finding that the younger you are the more risk you can assume. I agree with Kirk that http://www.familiesontheroad.com/ would be a good resource for you, You can see how many other families manage living on the road. I can suggest a You Tube channel or two: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU1rsUWQsHTj7ggTQUTq5Vg Modigazzi Travels are in a class C full time with two children. https://www.youtube.com/user/kelloggshow The Kelloggs have 12 or so children in their rv. https://www.youtube.com/user/NoMuckMedia have four children in their trailer. Once you start reading blogs at Families on the Road or watching videos on YT. . . one will lead to another and you will get an idea of what the life is like. Good luck to you!

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I will keep in mind that full time retired rvers aren't the most optomistic people.

 

 

Absolutely not true at all. These folks are some of the most optimistic people you will ever talk to. If they weren't, they would not be "full timing"!! I can promise you that ANYBODY that is living the full timing lifestyle HAS to be optimistic because of the obstacles they have overcome to achieve that lifestyle and the hurdles they have overcome while doing it!! Most, if not all, have faced the nay sayers and negative comments (many times from friends and family) when they started this lifestyle and didn't let it stop them. Their advice is priceless and backed by experience that is not "buyable" at any price so if I were you I would read them all again and think long and hard about what they had to say. Good luck with your decision and I (as well as the others on this site) are hoping you are successful...just proceed with caution and listen to those that have gone before you!

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Sometimes reality can be difficult to deal with, but most of us know pretty well what sort of RV can be purchased for $2000. We are concerned about your success and so we are trying to caution you and prevent your making a bad mistake. There are some bargains out there so you may be able to find one, but you need to go out looking with some advance knowledge of what to expect. Be careful and examine everything. You can find a good check list to use as you shop from the RV Consumer Group.

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I wonder if people leaving Birchwood RV Park after treatment sometimes sell their RVs? You could call and ask about that. Being able to buy one already on site could have benefits.

 

The fact that they list a children's playground as one of their amenities also makes me think this might be a good place for your family. More details at www.BirchwoodRV.com

 

Linda Sand

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