Jump to content

adding dump valve


GlennWest

Recommended Posts

That can't be Glenn, those are for your air tanks to drain the water out of them. You should have a switch that says "suspension", right above the sliding 5th wheel switch on the right side of the dash. Also, below that will be your differential lockout, use it to lock in all 4 drive wheels if you get stuck, or in soft areas, or, climbing over a high approach into a driveway if the axle lifts up and starts spinning.

 

Bill

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On our Freightliner our rear suspension switch on the dash allows you to lower the rear suspension by holding the switch to one side but as soon as you take your finger off it it starts airing back up. This is so you do not accindently drive with the suspension in the lowered position which will tear up joints.

 

I am not at home this week but if you need a picture of what the switch looks like Glenn just let me know and I will get one this weekend and post it.

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Centry I'm getting has pull cables outside above fuel tanks to dump rear air. Any way to add a means inside of cab or at least single source. Little disappointed when I saw this.

If your truck truly doesn't have this, the process is simple: add a switch on the dash (or reuse an existing switch), run a wire back to the axle, and do a little air plumbing. Find a spot on the hose from the air leveling valve to the air bags, and before the T that splits out to the two air bags. You're going to add another T, and two electrically-operated air valves. One valve needs to be Normally Open ("NO"), and the other needs to be Normally Closed ("NC"). You want the air from the leveling valve to flow through the NO valve, through the new T, and on to the existing T that splits out to the two air bags. On the remaining hole of the new T, add the NC valve. Sending 12V to the valves causes the leveling valve to simply feed a dead-end (courtesy of the NO valve closing), and causes the air bags to bleed out (courtesy of the NC valve opening)..

 

Imagine the existing system like this:

 

[leveling valve] ----------------------------------- T ====== [air bags]

 

The new system like this:

 

[leveling valve]-----[NO valve]---T------------- T =======[air bags]

|

L -------[NC valve]---(a breather cap would probably be wise)

 

 

It does have diff lock. Sorta shame to discard

Why are you discarding it anyway? Was it only on the power-divider axle?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some tandem axle trucks have a "Lock" that makes both rear axles live. My truck for instance in its original tandem form had the ability to lock both rear axles together as well as locking the differentials.

On my Volvo, the rear axle acts like an old GM limited slip. Flip the switch and the diff locks and its a GM posi trac. In my case though, it can react violently when one set of tires catches solid traction and launches you forward.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Likely showing my ignorance here. I was under the impression you lost this when singling.

In typical jargon, "differential" refers to the assortment of gears within each axle that allows the left and right shafts within that axle assembly to turn at different speeds, allowing the vehicle to make turns on dry pavement without snapping shafts or requiring wheel slippage, and accounts for minor differences between the tires on either side of that particular axle. "Power divider" refers to the assortment of gears within the forward-most axle of a tandem (or two axles in the case of a tridem setup) that allows the two axles to turn at independent speeds. This allows for tire differences between the forward driven axle and rear driven axle, and also accounts for differences in turning circle. The power divider is admittedly a differential in concept, but folks seem to be rather consistent in referring to it as a power divider, or perhaps "inter-axle differential".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In typical jargon, "differential" refers to the assortment of gears within each axle that allows the left and right shafts within that axle assembly to turn at different speeds, allowing the vehicle to make turns on dry pavement without snapping shafts or requiring wheel slippage, and accounts for minor differences between the tires on either side of that particular axle. "Power divider" refers to the assortment of gears within the forward-most axle of a tandem (or two axles in the case of a tridem setup) that allows the two axles to turn at independent speeds. This allows for tire differences between the forward driven axle and rear driven axle, and also accounts for differences in turning circle. The power divider is admittedly a differential in concept, but folks seem to be rather consistent in referring to it as a power divider, or perhaps "inter-axle differential".

Excellent description. Even I can understand it. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...