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Height height question


GlennWest

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My pin on Teton is as high as will go, I did this due to height of dually. My pin box height is 46.750. My hitch is 14. measured on level concrete pad so very close to accurate level. Should I drop my pin box, that would put it at height when I got it. Original owner towed it with a mdt. As it is I could raise it but not lower it with pin box once hitch height is determined on Freightliner.

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What are you measuring when you say "my hitch is 12.5"? Is that from the ground to the top of the hitch plate?

 

Your frame rails are 40". You will have to drop in the hitch between the frames rails.

 

If your pin has been raised as far as possible, I would drop the pin a bit and then position the hitch to fit. You want to leave some adjustment capabilities, both up and down to get the trailer to tow level. Changing the pin height is a lot easier than the hitch height.

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My mistake. Corrected. I looked at manufacturers site for that measurement. I then remembered it was custom build so I pulled tape. It is 14 inches high, 24 long, 18w. Yes that is what what I was thinking too. I will drop it to next set of holes. Mine drops an angle to front. It should drop 2", right?

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Ok. It's now 44.750 and in neutral (can go up or down) position. This is why I could never level Teton with my dually. Always little high. In 2003 likely they never dreamed someone would tow it with a ldt. Just for future reference what is height of Henry's hitches? If I ever replace mine I likely go with him.

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A standard bolster plate is around 47". I say "around" because they do vary a little - +/- an inch or so. I would target a standard setup IF you can. Otherwise you have to do whatever is required to get it to work.

 

To be clear - I would target my truck plate height to be 47". Then see if you can make your trailer work with that. If not you will have to adjust the truck somehow. But almost all trailers work with a truck plate of 47". You want the truck to be more "universal" if you can - for the next trailer.....

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I would be about 2.5" high if I went to 47". I have been towing it this high with no problems. No hot tires. I want to tow level though. Jack you really threw a wrench in this. I was considering later, year or so, independent suspension. Teton will get taller then. It's over 13' now.

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Thank you for your insight. I'm thinking level now. If I am close to Baytown where shop is it would not be a big job for me to raise hitch plate. Some 2.5" tube steel on top of angle that is bolted to chassis would bring it right up. It would amaze you how fast I can "unweld" a plate. Ever seen an arc gouger in action? Saves the steel also.

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You have to check the trailer being level when connect to the truck. Mark Shelly and I spent a lot of time trying to come up with the physics but my trailer pin height is lower when the trailer is level on the ground versus level connect to the truck.

 

There is a weight shift from the front jacks to the hitch which changes the center of gravity and the load on the suspension.

 

You can do a lot of measuring but the best thing is to connect the trailer, or dump the pin weight onto the truck, to see what the pin height is with the trailer connected.

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Glenn,

 

How much air are in your bags. You should be able to raise or lower them, not with the switch on the dash, it is the leveling valve on the rear axle or front axle. You only need to be off the "pedestal" a couple inches so the bags don't touch the flared part of the base to allow for bumps.

 

Bill

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Gloenn, I forgot to mention this.

 

My Freightliner was also too high. I have a gooseneck set up, (boy, don't open up that subject again). I went to 255/75R22.5 tires, the kind they use on drop deck semi trailers. It gives the trailer a 40 inch deck height on the bottom floor. Now, your going to drop, depending on tire brand 2-3 inches at least if your on 275/R22.5 or 285/R22.5. Being a fleet truck it most likely be the first number. You should not have to drop the bags, that is just an extra. Those tires match perfectly with your rims, and will carry, depending on the brand, up to 125PSI, and you can find them everywhere. I run Hankook, and have for years on my drops with very minimal failure, mostly by the drivers curbing them.

 

Bill

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Sorry guys. The truck is not in my possession yet. It is going this week to a welding shop in Houston. I am in Convent Louisana. Dealer is delivering it for me. I am trying to come up with hitch height so shop knows where to install hitch plate. Are you saying the rear of a semi drops under load. I thought the leveling valve stopped that.

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How much air are in your bags. You should be able to raise or lower them, not with the switch on the dash, it is the leveling valve on the rear axle or front axle. You only need to be off the "pedestal" a couple inches so the bags don't touch the flared part of the base to allow for bumps.

You should not mess with the leveling valve. Its purpose is to keep the drive shaft universals in alignment.

 

 

Are you saying the rear of a semi drops under load. I thought the leveling valve stopped that.

Not the truck, the trailer can rise.

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You are not visualizing this yet. Trailer is on the truck and is level. We disconnect the truck and we start to level the trailer with the Big Foot. The truck is at its ride height a couple a feet ahead of the pin. The trailer drops the pin down below the height of the hitch and then levels the trailer. The trailer is now level and lower than it was on the truck by a couple of inches.

 

If I had set the hitch to the height of the leveled trailer on the ground, it would have been a couple of inches low.

 

I just had the hitch height set to 47" as that was the consensus at the time. I then adjusted the trailer pin when we got the trailer to make the trailer ride level.

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Mine set at 47" hitch top from ground as well. Can adjust trailer pin as req

 

The plate the ET hitch is bolted to is 4.5" from bottom of frame outside to top edge of plate.

 

Like Mark said. No adj on truck. Leave ride height as it should be stock.

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It is the standard suspension, springs and shackles, 3 axles. Want IS on it but have to wait. Lot on plate now. I have never seen what Mark is stating. Now my dually goes way up when I unhook so I would never noticed it if it did. If what Mark is stating is fact how would one determine the height for hitch on truck? Have to have something to go on.

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Whoever mounts your hitch after singling, can add ballast to the back of the truck to simulate your pin weight to determine hitch height and match your leveled trailer pin box height

It doesn't matter how much ballast you add, the leveling valve will still bring the truck up to the factory rail height which keeps the drive train in alignment.

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