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Stan Wright

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14ft doors fit all legal height on highway vehicles...

 

Said the guy who built a door too short one time...

I also would build a 14' door. You never know what the future will bring. And although it will cost more, given the higher side walls, it won't cost all THAT much more. Something to seriously consider.

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14ft doors fit all legal height on highway vehicles...

 

Said the guy who built a door too short one time...

X2

Truck fit after I trimmed my stack. And my old trailer fit with room to spare ?

But new trailer a ya no way. To tall and to long?

Things change go 14ft if you can and as long as you can trust me

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I have 14' doors on my shop. I need to be sure the door is ALL the way up to come in with the truck.

 

And, go at least 2' wider than you think you need. I have a 14 x 14 and a 14 x 20. Both are too small.

Rick, why do you feel 14x20 is not wide enough. Seems like plenty of width to me. I'm curious because I'm toying with the idea of building a (large) barn for the truck/trailer/apt.

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I just built a new shop/office this past winter. I have 14' doors and yes bringing the truck and trailer in to the shop requires the doors be all the way up the stop. This photo makes it look like it does not fit but it is a camera angle issue. Tip of the exhaust pipe clears with about 5" with the door all the way to the stop. My doors are 12' wide.

 

PRE_RALLY.JPG

 

As for height, I am 22' tall. We were originally thinking 18' or maybe 20' tall but after talking to the steel building company we learned that the steel sheeting for the outside came in 22' lengths and would have to be cut down to our desired height. So basically the shorter height was more expensive due to labor and the added steel needed in framing only added minimal cost. The height makes it nice if I have to work on top of the trailer as I am able to completely stand up. The height also give the heat someplace to go in the summer (I am in Texas so heat is a issue). In the middle of summer it is very workable in the shop in the middle of the day. The doors in the photo face north and I do have 1 door on the south side to allow a breeze to come thru the building. The middle bay is a pull thru.

 

As for each bay width I went with 16'. I figured that at 16' that was wide enough for the trailer with the slides out. Plus I knew the trailer would go in the middle bay (sewer connection in the floor to dump tanks) so I would still have plenty of room to get around the trailer with the slides out as well as be able to use the lanes on either side of it. Even with the truck in either of the outside lanes I can still get around it with ease.

 

Also if building new think about insulation. The entire building is R30. It was about 90* the day the insulation was being installed and I had my I/R out and it was about a 7* difference from where the installation was installed vs where it was not.

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Thanks Rick. I'd for sure go with the 22'. I was thinking 14'x14' doors with extra space between them, but you have me convinced now that 14x16 is the way to go.

 

I agree on the insulation - anything I build would be fully insulated. I'd likely put a sewer drain at each space. Easy enough to do during construction. I would also want to be able to store the trailer with the slides open, so the door spacing will be wide enough for that at any slot.

 

I'm still just toying with the idea....at this point we are not ready to get off the road.

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I considered adding sewer dump to all three lanes but decided I did not want the clean outs on the floor. If you notice the concrete has a earthy/wheat color to it instead of being your normal concrete gray. We did the same with the concrete in the shop. So if we need a large area for an event everything can be moved out of the shop and an event held there. So the less floor obstructions the better.

 

We did live in the trailer for two months here in the shop. Couple of things to think about if you plan on doing something similar is all you see when you look outside the windows of the trailer is the, well shop. To us guys that sounds good but ...... With the back door open we could see out of the shop but only from the back window. Due to weather we would close the doors at night in case it rained or something so you had no idea of what was happening outside.

 

At 12' wide for moving in/out the door width is not problem. In the photo I am working on the truck with it half in/out of shop. That is not typical. Currently we have all our household goods/furniture in the far lane while the house is being built and living in a couple of the empty offices. We will be glad once the house is complete and then all my toys will be inside. A 14' width does make it easer to get past the truck when sitting half in/out like in the photo. I would also consider a 14' width if you do not have a straight alignment when moving the trailer in/out. Again just a little more room for error.

 

With 12' wide doors and each lane at 16' that gives me 4' between each door. I have a set of steel shelves that are on casters between each doors. This gives me a catch all for stuff instead of just putting it down on the floor somewhere, which just so tempting.....

 

The other thing I did was put 6 50A RV drops in the shop. So I have more than enough power any where I need it in the shop. I just have some break down boxes to step down the power if I don't need that much in the location I am working at. It has came in handy so far. We needed to hook up the dryer and it was real easy to build a box that I needed for the power for the dryer that just plugged in to a 50A RV outlet.

 

The R30 insulation was worth the expense. Very impressed with it this past summer. Looking forward to see how much the furnace does not have to work this winter.

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I think it is Rule 2 of shop / storage building design: Carefully make scale plan models (above view looking down) of all your stuff, spend hours moving them about on the floor plan of the proposed building, park them this way and that, make many notes and calculations of what the "minimal" most perfect everything just fits how cheap you could get away with, change the size 11 teen times until you arrive at the absolute PERFECT building design... And then double it. :)

 

Rule 3: circles enclose the most area with the least wall, but are awkward to work with.

 

Rule 4: squares are the next most efficient

 

Rule 5: rectangles take more of everything - foundation, feet of wall, square of roof to cover the same area.

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Rick, why do you feel 14x20 is not wide enough. Seems like plenty of width to me. I'm curious because I'm toying with the idea of building a (large) barn for the truck/trailer/apt.

For normal road going machinery, a 14x14 would be fine. I have an active farm. When we built the shop, the biggest piece of equipment was 20'. Now 40' is common. Too big is never quite big enough......................

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