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Super Singles


Larry&Donna-AK

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Your screwed big time for several reasons.

 

1.) You blow a single your going to ruin the rim.......period. Now you get to buy a tire and rim.

2.) You can hobble in on the other tire on duals at least to get off the road.

3.) Any idea when one of those singles blow how much rubber is going to rip off your fenders, fuel tank, air lines, YOUR AIR BAGS!

4.)They do hydroplane in rain. You don't have enough weight like a semi to remain stable.

5.) Try to find a super single in Winnamuca, Payson, Quartzite, Van Horn, get the idea?

 

Bigtrailer

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Rocky

Wide based tires should not be used on singled Trucks (pulling trailers) unless the truck is equipped with ESP or ESC (Electronic Stability Program/Control).

Michelin XOne Service Manual Page 22

Trey, that's why I was wondering what Rod's friend has. I would never consider wide based tires on a singled truck, even if Michelin said it was OK, for the main reason of leaving me stranded and not able to limp down the road.

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Trey, that's why I was wondering what Rod's friend has. I would never consider wide based tires on a singled truck, even if Michelin said it was OK, for the main reason of leaving me stranded and not able to limp down the road.

He is singled and has put a lot of miles on the truck. Pulls a heavy trailer has a heavy deck with motorcycle lift. Considering an Alaska trip in the near future. Not sure how many years before I met him 3 years ago he did the conversion from dual to super singles. I got him a spare tire from my brothers shop. He hadn't carried one for years. (Prep for Alaska trip). Not saying he is correct an expert of anything. Just sharing the information. I thought about it with my trailer and could still possibly do it. Two less tires to age out with lots of tread still on them.

 

Rod

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Your screwed big time for several reasons.

 

1.) You blow a single your going to ruin the rim.......period. Now you get to buy a tire and rim.

2.) You can hobble in on the other tire on duals at least to get off the road.

3.) Any idea when one of those singles blow how much rubber is going to rip off your fenders, fuel tank, air lines, YOUR AIR BAGS!

4.)They do hydroplane in rain. You don't have enough weight like a semi to remain stable.

5.) Try to find a super single in Winnamuca, Payson, Quartzite, Van Horn, get the idea?

 

Bigtrailer

This retired trucker can agree with all this except #1. True, you COULD ruin the rim but not every time. I probably had a problem with a blown SS about 4 times and NEVER ruined the rim.

 

Can't agree more with #5! I sat on an exit ramp once going into Atlanta (Marietta) with a blown SS waiting for the roadside service for 7 hours. No SS found in the area to install for me. Who would have thought one would not be available in Atlanta of all places? My terminal manager wound up getting one from our shop in Chattanooga and bringing it down for the tire guy to install !

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Sounds like most of you better start running dual steers for fear of ... anything ever going wrong. :rolleyes: Seriously, anecdotal stories from guys that run 100K miles/yr compared to the number of SS on tractors and trailers is statistically insignificant. How many miles do any of us run with our greatly under-loaded HDT's?

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But the truth about trying to find one, roadside, would be enough for me. I'm singled so I needn't worry, but they are a rare tire to find. Every roadside guy has a 22.5 for my truck, drive or steer axle, but you will get bent over trying to find an SS roadside...period. And all for the "cool" factor?

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I don't think singles on the single axle rear are a good idea even if you have stability control. To me that seems kinda obvious. But I suppose that technically they could be OK. My bigger issue on a singled tractor is availability and ability to get off the road - as others have said.

 

As cool as they look, I'll stick to duals. If I bought a truck with singles and left it tandem I might run them for awhile but I'd switch to duals at some point in time. JMO.

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We looked at wide based tires but Volvo & Michelin discourage it on singled rear's unless ESC equipped and even then there is concern on the "rapid loss of pressure" condition.

Also, another reason we went with standard dual tires on our singled rear is that by the time you slap a Smart bed on the back, the SS tires are kind of hidden in the wheel well.

Loses the "cool factor".

:oB)

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My understanding is there are two axle widths. The wider one is specifically for SS, but its too wide to run duals.

 

The narrower one can run SS but you end up with a narrower track. But you can also run duals.

 

I read that most fleets with SS are staying with the narrow axle so they can go back to duals if necessary.

 

But you lose a lot of the 'cool' appearance with the narrow axle as it is tucked more under the bed.

 

Geo

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While there are a lot of benefits to Super Singles, there are a lot of negatives, as have been pointed out.

 

The majority of the trucks you see running SS tires are fleet trucks with a fairly good support system if they get a flat.

 

It is not by coincidence that with a large number of other non-super single over the road trucks, you will see that they usually carry an unmourned all position tire that can literally go on any position, either at a tire shop, or the side of the road if a steer tire blows.

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2degree offset wheel and a 0 degree offset wheel

I'm sure you mean 2" and 0". Just clarifying. The 2" offset give full width on a standard dual wheel axle but most manufacturers don't approve as the outer wheel bearing is overloaded. The Meritor axle takes care of that by averaging the width of the two axles and having a larger outer bearing

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Another full time trucker weighing in.

I agree all with all the negatives already presented.

There are 2 applications where super singles are indicated.

1. Weight savings in applications (tanker hauling repeat identical loads) where the aggregate weight savings translates into more gallons hauled per load over time to make a slight positive difference in fleet efficiency ($).

2. Fuel efficiency (2-3% avg)increase distributed over millions of miles traveled to justify the offset in increased costs and agravation.

 

You simply cannot justify the use of SS tires in the HDT RV arena on a cost or efficiency basis. If you think they are cool, do it, but you will pay for it.

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