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Looking Stations with Real Diesel not Bio-Diesel


ms60ocb

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Locally I can stop and look at Diesel pumps (maybe I'm just filling the car with gas or buying a newspaper) and decide were straight Diesel is being sold. Thus when I routinely fill-up I can have real Diesel.

 

What I'm looking for is a Link or app that will allow me find places that a has a pump(s) that sells pure diesel (No Bio--diesel added). Has anyone know of such a source that help locate those sites after I leave my local area. After that I then have decide if I can fill-up with the FW connected or a quick disconnect.

 

Gas buddy will give prices and the more expensive diesel in a area is not an indication of a pure diesel. Observed cost increase 5-8 cents or 2.5 %

 

Difference between Bio-diesel and pure diesel in my Ford 6.7 diesel is Mileage. when driving the rather flat lands I just watch Fuel Economy on a 2 minute average., If I see a drop for no apparent reason I assume RE-GEN. The RE-GEN 's using Bio-Diesel seems to come more often and definitely longer duration. thus overall lower MPG. I believe the non Re-Gen running is better MPG but pulling the 37 foot Montana changes ave MPG greatly with the direction of the wind .

 

2011 Ford F350 Dually 6.7 CC LB

2010 Keystone Montana 37 foot

 

Clay

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Using Bio is the best lubricant for your engine. No need to add any aftermarket lub.

And it will clean your tank/lines of that nasty stuff the Non bio fuel put in them.

 

If your mileage has dropped with it. Slow down to 55-58 MPH and it will probably be the same or better then running 65-70. :)

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, I have been unable to find any stations in Illinois that have diesel with 5% or less diesel.

I can name places that may pure diesel or specific stations locations in some smaller towns in NW Illinois.

Places that may are some are; Phillips, Caseys and FS. In Monroe WI there is one station but not sure of name.

It seems to follow private ownership.

Clay .

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In the southwest USA Valero stations usually have non-bio diesel. They don't all have diesel, though. I stopped using Flying J when they went bio because their pumps said it might be a higher percentage than my Sprinter would accept. It's also my experience that stations advertising no Ethanol also have non-bio diesel if they sell diesel.

 

Linda Sand

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And the state of Oregon is encouraging the use of B20 by not charging the normal road tax on it! I saw diesel for 40 cents lower than anyplace else in town and pulled in to fill up the coach but soon departed - don't want that crap in my tank!

 

Lenp

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If I could get that big a break on the price, I would probably add 30 gallons per side into the 150 gallon tanks, then add a bit more each time until I was sure the fuel system was happy.

 

Probably going to cause a few unscheduled filter changes, but at the end of the day the entire fuel system will be shiny clean. In the long run maybe not such a bad deal.

 

I don't have religion about either bio-diesel or ethanol. Its big government in action, paid for by those that can afford to pay for it. Turning food into fuel never struck me as that good an idea but I don't circulate at the levels that make those decisions.

 

Geo

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  • 2 weeks later...

This hubub about not using biodiesel is just like the hysteria when unleaded gas became the norm, it is a non-issue. Virtually all diesel today contains 2%/B2 biodiesel to replace lost lubricity during the refining process that removes sulfur. This Lubricity additive study is very enlightening.

I challenge everyone, find a documented case where biodiesel has ruined a diesel engine. My old 1932 Chevrolet runs just fine on unleaded gas, and my old 1972 Case diesel tractor runs just fine on B20/20% biodiesel. BUT, if you've been buying dirty fuel, you will be changing fuel filters often until your system gets clean again.

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Seems a lot of people forget what the original diesel motors were designed to run on.

 

Barb

Back in 1891 Kerosene, also known as lamp oil, is a combustible hydrocarbon liquid widely used as a fuel in industry and households. Its name derives from Greek: κηρός (keros) meaning wax, and was registered as a trademark by Abraham Gesner in 1854 before evolving into a genericized trademark. It is sometimes spelled kerosine in scientific and industrial usage.[1] The term "kerosene" is common in much of India, Canada, the United States, Argentina, Australia and New Zealand.[2][3]

Kerosene is usually called paraffin in the UK, Southeast Asia, East Africa and South Africa.[4] A more viscous paraffin oil is used as a laxative. A waxy solid extracted from petroleum is called paraffin wax.

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This hubub about not using biodiesel is just like the hysteria when unleaded gas became the norm, it is a non-issue. Virtually all diesel today contains 2%/B2 biodiesel to replace lost lubricity during the refining process that removes sulfur. This Lubricity additive study is very enlightening.

I challenge everyone, find a documented case where biodiesel has ruined a diesel engine. My old 1932 Chevrolet runs just fine on unleaded gas, and my old 1972 Case diesel tractor runs just fine on B20/20% biodiesel. BUT, if you've been buying dirty fuel, you will be changing fuel filters often until your system gets clean again.

 

I think it's the fuel system for those of us running the B5 certified diesels that's the issue, though I'm confident that "making engine oil" (where we're actually adding diesel fuel to the engine oil during active dpf cleaning) isn't doing anything useful for the lube capability of the engine oil. I'd post a link to my experience on the diesel stop forum, but it's not saving here when I post to this thread.

 

BTW: The days of $19.95 for a fuel pump and an hour to replace it are gone. My fuel pump was $4,500. Total repair was $10,034, and we loss the use of the truck for two weeks. The fuel pump failed due to rust. (I didn't know aluminum rusted. Corrode, yes, but no rust.) We never saw any water in any fuel drainings. I'm a CFI-II (water in fuel tends to be fatal in aviation) plus eight years in the Navy Reserve as a Fuels Logistics Officer; I know how to drain & check for water and I did. Never saw any water before the fuel pump failure and haven't seen any since. However, we've since learned that Minnesota law mandates B10 or greater diesel, and we'd been in Minnesota volunteering for a summer at Voyageurs Natl Park 18 months before the fuel pump failed. Makes me think there really is something to that B5 rating our truck has.

 

David

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I don't believe that something with as much lubricity as bio has could ruin a pump, but then again I have been wrong before. I have run more than a few tanks of B-99 in my 1996 Cummins. Within the first two miles (distance from the dispenser to my house) I noticed that the engine ran much smoother and the smoke was less. I also discovered that the smoke at wide open was grey, not black, and that with my injectors the truck would put out a haze when idling warm. There is a slight loss of power and my mileage did drop about 1 to 1.5 mpg. I also noticed that when I went to diesel the boost guage moved more and faster along with a noticeable seat of the pants increase in power. I did not even have to change my fuel filter either.

The use of biodiesel was mandated by federal law without regard to vehicles that would be in violation of manufacturers warranties due to the percentage required. If you own one of these vehicles your screwed, you either fill it up with fuel it is not made to run on and take your chances that nothing will go wrong because the warranty will not cover damage done or park your $60,000 vehicle and watch it rust.

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I think it's the fuel system for those of us running the B5 certified diesels that's the issue, though I'm confident that "making engine oil" (where we're actually adding diesel fuel to the engine oil during active dpf cleaning) isn't doing anything useful for the lube capability of the engine oil. I'd post a link to my experience on the diesel stop forum, but it's not saving here when I post to this thread.

 

BTW: The days of $19.95 for a fuel pump and an hour to replace it are gone. My fuel pump was $4,500. Total repair was $10,034, and we loss the use of the truck for two weeks. The fuel pump failed due to rust. (I didn't know aluminum rusted. Corrode, yes, but no rust.) We never saw any water in any fuel drainings. I'm a CFI-II (water in fuel tends to be fatal in aviation) plus eight years in the Navy Reserve as a Fuels Logistics Officer; I know how to drain & check for water and I did. Never saw any water before the fuel pump failure and haven't seen any since. However, we've since learned that Minnesota law mandates B10 or greater diesel, and we'd been in Minnesota volunteering for a summer at Voyageurs Natl Park 18 months before the fuel pump failed. Makes me think there really is something to that B5 rating our truck has.

 

David

According to this website: http://www.utahbiodieselsupply.com/blog/best-diesel-vehicles-for-biodiesel/

Your engine is warranted for up to B20 biodiesel.

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