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Full time in travel trailer or 5th wheel


Believe

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If someone can find this thread, thanks. Saw motor home vs 5th but ours is 5th vs tt. We have 5th right now,but keep wondering if we should get bigger tt, as we can tow a bigger one than haul bigger 5th. Or just get newer truck and bigger 5th. Just wanting opinions as don't seemany ft in tt. We would be stationary 5 months, tgen a stopfor 2 months thendouthfor 3 to 4 then back to Ontario till our Atlantic Canada seasonal spot opens. Just looking gor pros and cons, leaning to 5th wheels right now. Thanks...

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Fifthwheel is my choice. More living space for less overall towing length, more internal storage, easier to hook up/unhook. safer and more stable to tow.

 

Many fifthwheels are set up for one couple, while many TTs are set up for family vacations (more beds).

 

If you look at the distribution of trailers in SKP parks, there are very few TTs compared to Fifthwheels - there has to be a reason for this experienced group to make this choice..

 

John

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We've had all three - travel trailer, 5th wheel and motorhome. In order of preference for us: motorhome, 5th wheel, travel trailer. Compared to the others, the travel trailer lacked storage space, didn't have the quality, and felt very insecure on the highway. . . but then, that's us. Everyone will have different experiences, including you. It just depends on your finances and travel style. It doesn't seem like you'll be doing much traveling so the travel trailer would probably work for you. Good luck with your choice!

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I don't think you'll find too many souls that would argue against a 5'r providing more storage, more amenities, and easier towing. You have to have enough rig to tow with, however, which can add to the initial expense.. but remember it will also retain a higher resale value and you can never have too much truck. I started with a class A n' toad, down to 2-5'rs, and now a TT.. but I travel solo and need the smaller/lighter rig to get to places I want to go. I would never consider trying to make a go of it with 2 adults for any extended length of time in my current rig (25' TT).

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I'm in the 5,the wheel on this one. However I'm confused over your statement about you can tow a bigger TT as opposed to 5th wheel. Weight is weight, GCVW are the SME no matter what. It really just as matter of where your putting it, in the bed or on the end. Long term a larger 5th wheel will be more stable in towing.

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...However I'm confused over your statement about you can tow a bigger TT as opposed to 5th wheel. Weight is weight, GCVW are the SME no matter what...

GCWR is only one factor to be considered. A TT generally will put 10-15% of the trailer weight on the truck. A 5th wheel will will put 20-25% of the trailer weight on the truck. So for a 10,000# TT, the truck will have to carry 1,000-1,500# while for a 10,000# 5th wheel it will be carrying 2,000-2500#. This is why 150/1500, 250/2500 and 350/3500 single rear wheel pickups often end up over their Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) or Rear Axle Weight Rating (RAWR) when towing a 5th wheel even if the combination is under the GCWR.

 

...We have 5th right now,but keep wondering if we should get bigger tt, as we can tow a bigger one than haul bigger 5th. Or just get newer truck and bigger 5th... Just looking gor pros and cons, leaning to 5th wheels right now. Thanks...

As has been mentioned in other threads like this one, There are travel trailers with floor plans and storage similar to 5th wheels. However, they are usually long and heavy, so may not be suitable for your current truck. Statements regarding the greater storage space of 5th wheels generally disregard the storage space that is available in the truck bed or cargo area of a van used as a tow vehicle. The fact that compartments in a 5th wheel house the propane tanks, batteries and generator which can be mounted on the tongue of a travel trailer is also often disregarded. I seriously doubt that a 30' 5th wheel has that much more storage space than a travel trailer with a 30' box (which because of the tongue would likely be 32-33' bumper to hitch). The majority of travel trailers are built for the vacation/weekend market and therefore are often not of the quality construction of the more expensive 5th wheels considered to be suitable for fulltime use by many on this forum. Many of these travel trailers are not that well insulated. There are a few brands that are advertised as four season trailers and come with heated tanks/under bellies, thermopane windows and higher quality insulation. The majority of travel trailers have less than a 35' box (total length 37-38') while 5th wheels from 35-40' and longer are much more common.

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When I went full time, I did a lot of research. Motorhomes quickly were eliminated. I would have preferred a TT that my F-150 would handle. I could not find one with a floor plan that I thought I could live the rest of my life with. Several 5th wheels had a floor plan that looked good, but I could not find a new one (fortunately) with a floor plan I liked. My choice, which forced me to upgrade to an F-250 SRW, was a 2003 HitchHiker 35 FKTG. I went searching for those and found one in New York that looked good, but it was gone the next day. Finally found one in Lincoln, NE and bought that one. I love the trailer, but if I had it to do over again, I would have let Kansas RV Center know what I was looking for and then just waited till they found something I wanted.

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This coming from hubby, we ordered our F150, payload is 2400 lbs and the towing capacity is 11,300 lbs. It's a special order F150. Almost 250 but not quite. Its called Max tow/max payload option.

He also said thanks for replying about the GVW ect.above.

We looked at class C today,nice but don't feel like a home.

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I'd never towed anything before we set off with a 1ton diesel and a 32ft 5er.A year later and we're still alive i.e. the 5er is easy to tow. TT gives you one advantage - your truck bed is available for carrying a quad which you cant do in a 5er. Manouverabiity is a bit easier in a 5er since your overall length is less and the pivot point is right over your rear wheels.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Before we decided on a MH for our full-time coach, we seriously considered both a TT and 5'er. At that time the only high quality TT that was recommended to us was an Airstream, while there were several 5'ers that qualified. We quickly learned that the high quality 5'ers were quite heavy, approximately twice the weight of the Airstream. The Airstream also had only two steps from outside to inside, while the 5'ers had three to six, plus the three steps inside to get to the bath.

 

A TT can be towed with a full-size van or pickup, while a 5'er requires a pickup. If that is an issue for you, then you have made your decision. If not, you have options.

 

As others have said, a TT gives you the full bed to use, while a 5'er takes up a section of the bed with the hitch. If you go with a TT you can put a cap on the bed and have lots of space that is fairly weather-tight. If you go with a 5'er you can put two tool boxes on the side of the bed and a larger one across the front of the bed to help out with storage.

 

A good weight distributing hitch that also has sway control will do wonders to make towing easier if you choose a TT. The biggest factor, though, is getting enough tow vehicle to safely handle the weight. Few people complain about having too much truck, but there are lots of people who had to upgrade the truck because the pucker factor was too great.

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This coming from hubby, we ordered our F150, payload is 2400 lbs and the towing capacity is 11,300 lbs. It's a special order F150. Almost 250 but not quite. Its called Max tow/max payload option.

 

With that particular rig you'll be looking at a travel trailer then. You won't find many 5er's where the pin weight and the weight of the hitch itself that will be able to stay within your rigs payload capacity.. once you add another adult, full fuel tank and the other misc. items you'll undoubtedly load into your F150.

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