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Satellite Internet - Second New Option !


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First up was the debut of the brand new RV DataSAT 840, a $5,995 roof-mounted auto-aiming dish designed for RVers with an innovative pay-as-you-go data plan.

And now, thanks to some diligent work by satellite service reseller Real Time Communications (RTC), something once thought nearly impossible is becoming real:

 

Next generation spot beam satellite service - with mobility support! A $995 tripod setup, with monthly service costs of $99/month.

Read on for more information: Another New RV Satellite Internet Option – Mobile HughesNet Ka-Band from RTC

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. . . thanks to some diligent work by satellite service reseller Real Time Communications (RTC), something once thought nearly impossible is becoming real:

 

Next generation spot beam satellite service - with mobility support! A $995 tripod setup, with monthly service costs of $99/month.

Read on for more information: Another New RV Satellite Internet Option – Mobile HughesNet Ka-Band from RTC

 

 

This really snuck under everyone's radar! Thanks for the heads up.

 

I contacted RTC and got some details . . .

  • 20GB/month for $120 (same as Verizon's new pricing!) - GOOD
  • 18-month contract required - BAD
  • Satellite service is only available in the Continental US -- VERY BAD (at least for me)
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Cool beans! So glad to see other options becoming available. As other choices become available, competition will drive GB costs down.

 

And sometimes you just 'must' have internet capability. Many mobile businesses where the office is on top of a set of wheels:)! Those with businesses, can legitimately write some of these costs off.

 

For sure, another tool in the toolbox!!

 

Thanks for the info sharing,

Smitty

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  • 2 weeks later...

It is not so much that there is no spot beam aimed at your location, rather it is the bother the NOC would have to go through to move your modem from one beam to another. Folks from the DirectWay Hughes era will recall the nightmare involved in getting switched from 105 with service into Mexico to 99 that had service into Canada. It usually took a dealer to even attempt to make the switch and then telling the NOC folks one of the very few acceptable "stories" they would accept about why your old sat signal was no longer available.

Having a spot beamed system that included something like cell phones have so that switching satellites as you moved was as easy as the phones switch towers would be great for RVers but so far nobody has seen a way to make a profit offering it.

Wide area beams are going the way of the dinosaur, there are too few locations, too few frequencies and too few TDM slots available to carry the amount of data that the sat providers need to move for them to be practical for consumer use. Some will survive for folks that need the mobility AND have the deep pockets to pay for it. Look at the map above, 100 spots, just a few frequencies to avoid overlap and serving a large number of customers versus a spot that could serve a fraction of the number of customers.

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I think what might push me into a satellite dish again is the possible fragile nature of cell service such as when our government might become irritated with its citizens. (I know. That's black helicopter stuff but I like to look ahead. I also keep a couple sacks of rice and beans in one of the bays.)

 

Back in the stick and brick days before starting to full time I went from dial up into one of the very first satellite setups with direcway or whatever the original name was (Data Storm? It's been a long time ago.)

 

I really like the data plan of the DataSAT 840. Up front money doesn't bother me near as much as being tied to expensive recurring monthly charges. But for serious bandwidth I'd have to stay with the Verizon hot spot.

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I think what might push me into a satellite dish again is the possible fragile nature of cell service such as when our government might become irritated with its citizens. (I know. That's black helicopter stuff but I like to look ahead. I also keep a couple sacks of rice and beans in one of the bays.)

 

Back in the stick and brick days before starting to full time I went from dial up into one of the very first satellite setups with direcway or whatever the original name was (Data Storm? It's been a long time ago.)

 

I really like the data plan of the DataSAT 840. Up front money doesn't bother me near as much as being tied to expensive recurring monthly charges. But for serious bandwidth I'd have to stay with the Verizon hot spot.

Really? And you think that the government doesn't have control of the satellites?! Get serious. If they want to stop your access they can do so at anytime! Dennis

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Really? And you think that the government doesn't have control of the satellites?! Get serious. If they want to stop your access they can do so at anytime! Dennis

Well, I would assume that it would be a local or regional thing. And a handful of scattered satellite links wouldn't be on their radar screens. And it might be nice to have the dish in a disaster situation. Just like those sacks of beans and rice I keep in the bays. We all march to our own drummer. I guess the old Boy Scouts motto of "Be Prepared" has stuck with me.
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It is not a lot of scattered satellite links, it is usually one or two that matter, depending on the service. No reason to try to find and shut down all the users when you pull one plug in the NOC and they are all shut down.

 

Cell phone, DSL, Cable or Satellite you are going to be using a modem that sends out a unique identifying number every time you try and connect. For every service I'm aware of they have to be specifically enabled by the network provider before they work. They are just as easy to pull off line and out of service, Cox Cable here can do that in under 5 minutes once you get past the phone answering computer to a human. Getting on-line can be as fast if your firmware doesn't need flashed to a different version.

 

 

A sat link in a disaster is good if you have it operable, that means having it activated and in service before the mess hits since doing that after is either going to be impossible due to the phone outages or if they are working, the sat would be unneeded in the first place.

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Called RTC yesterday for some info. The tech I spoke to was a little surprised that I got their information from this forum. I guess I thought this post was from RTC. That shows my ignorance to all. This post however is a little outdated in the fact that the $99 now is for 20 GB per month, I'm sure this will change often for a while.

I'm very interested, because the other day we finally made it to the lake for the first time this summer only to find I could not get Hughes to download the new files to the modem, because they said the zip code was wrong. I purchased this tri-pod system from an Escapee, and have used it for years all over the lower US from Florida to California. I was only about 15 miles from home, and the only way I got service was to aim the dish for the strongest signal for the new location, and then, without moving the dish, restart the program, with my home zip. Now my concern is when we head South in a couple weeks, will Hughes have shut down their Ku band service, and not allow for reprograming. If RTC can use the SpaceWay3 with Ka,spot beam, why can't I just upgrade to Gen4, and change to the SpaceWay3 satellite. I know I would need a certified installer for the change, but I'm just trying to get by for the next year or two until the "new" systems become available. From what I hear they will be better/simpler, and I think even now with the spot beam, you don't have to pass the cross-pole test, but I'm not sure about that. Am I way off with this thinking?? Thanks, Dick T

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  • 2 weeks later...

After Zulu posted the map of Spaceway3 coverage I had the bright idea that I might be able to keep my Hughes account and just have an installer change my satellite to Spaceway3. I found out a couple years ago that my neighbor is one of THOSE. He checked it out only to find out that's not possible. Then the other day I received an email from StarBand that they will remain open and are going to be able to offer the mobile service after all. We purchased our service from Maxwell Satellite 9 years ago and have just "got along" with it as we go to so many areas with no other option. Hughes has been making it more difficult the last few years, but I have always been able to adjust. No more :angry: I guess the Ku band is going to be a thing of the past. My neighbor has been telling me the last year or so to try and get by until "Jupiter" is up and running. Now Mobil Internet Satellite(StarBand) will be offering both Spaceway3 and Jupiter, but they use different modems. At present, the Jupiter area is limited until some time in 2016, but the service is better and faster. I will try to find out how big of a deal it would be to buy the Spaceway modem and service, then change to the Jupiter modem and service when/if it comes online with the full service area (I guess). Dose anyone know, or is anyone interested, or is it just us Desert Rats?

 

Dick T

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I have a .98M DirecWay dish & HN7000S modem I've never used -- bought it "just in case". The RTC KA band portable dish looked great until I found that it is (so far) limited to the Continental US.

We're not headed to Alaska for at least a couple of years, so I'll wait to see what happens . . . looks promising though.

Here's an update on RTC's KA dish -- installation manual at the bottom of this web page.

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For now I will stick with my Datastorm Hughes.net $79.99 KU service. Push a button the dish finds the satellite I need.

Have 5 free hours a day of data. Plus uploads not counted anytime.

 

Since I Full time I no longer have any storage bin with room enough to store that dish/stand/arm/LMB plus other parts and don't want to spend the time of getting it out putting it together and finding the satellite and then taking down and putting away.

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For now I will stick with my Datastorm Hughes.net $79.99 KU service. Push a button the dish finds the satellite I need.

Have 5 free hours a day of data. Plus uploads not counted anytime.

 

Since I Full time I no longer have any storage bin with room enough to store that dish/stand/arm/LMB plus other parts and don't want to spend the time of getting it out putting it together and finding the satellite and then taking down and putting away.

That sounds good, unless you are under a tree! :unsure: I don't have much roof space with the solar, which also doesn't work too well under a tree. :wub:

BTW, do you have a Hughes account for your service, or pay Datastorm direct? Wonder if the Ku band will be around much longer?

 

Dick T

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I pay a VAR RTC for my Hughes.net service. Datastorm went out of business a couple or so years ago.

 

I almost never have park under a tree. I don't like bird/sap/leaves droppings on my roof. :(

I can't remember how many years ago it was, that I did spend one night under a tree that the Datastorm wouldn't work.

And I like open spaces so my Trav'ler dish is also happy. :)

 

In over 12 years of having Datastorm service 24/7. This summer is the first time I have ever put it on vacation mode.

So far since May I have had good campground WiFi service or Straightalk(Verizon) hot spot or my iPhone 6 Plus(no hot spot) with unlimited data has worked for me.

 

I will turn the Datastorm back on in Oct. at my winter spot that has no cable or DSL service nor any WiFi.

Or when my 1 GB Straightalk(Verizon) runs out or used up before 10/7/15.

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Incidentally, there is a 2nd trial about to start up very quietly ... probably in early October.

 

It is from MobileInternetsatellite.com and we have been doing mobile satellite Internet since it all started, with the DW3000!

 

Here is a little of the history of mobile satellite Internet:

http://blog.mobileinternetsatellite.com/2014/04/the-early-years-of-mobile-satellite.html

 

There are other posts following this one that take the history further.

 

Unfortunately, until a new satellite is launched next year and put into service, we cannot offer nationwide coverage. But, we can offer the standard consumer service plans, which are a little more affordable.

 

Here is a link to a map showing the areas you can get:

http://www.mobileinternetsatellite.com/hughesnet-service-plans.html

 

If you stay primarily in the areas shown in either the older Spaceway or the newer Jupiter coverage areas, then you should be fine.

 

Once the new satellite is in service, the faster Jupiter plans will be available coast-to-coast.

 

Barb

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