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Ideas for a home base?


Velos

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We are looking for a place to eventually permanently park our fiver, build a patio around it and a carport over head. In our travels we have found several available for lease but not for sale. We want to be in a RV community and not just on a piece of land.

 

We haven't spent much time in Washington State but thinking for summer living that may be a potential location?

 

Do any of you own a deeded RV Lot and if so where? What would you do different if you bought another one?

 

 

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We own lots (deeded) at Retama Village, Mission TX. and at the Escapees North Ranch, Congress AZ. Both are great in the winter, and not really a summer location.

 

Thank you. I have hear positive review for both those locations.

 

We are probably doing this backwards. We found a home base for the winter that we like in the desert and are now trying to find a place to stay cool and park the RV for the summers.

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I have a summer RV lot that I own on the UP of MI in Cedarville. It is a deeded lot RV park

that is on Lake Huron. The park is open from May 1st thru mid-October. It is run by a board of directors

that are elected from the lot owners. While there are many more of these RV parks in winter arrears like FL or AZ,

there are a good number in summer parts of the Country. Good Luck

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Here's a list of deeded lots for sale and most are in Skookum. We stayed there once are were not impressed. It can get very hot in that area and it's not close to good medical, shopping. We also thought, by their advertising, that the lots would be on the river. At that time - years ago, none were on the river and in fact, were across the highway from the river. Perhaps things have changed by now.

 

Don't forget that there's an Escapee park in Chimacum, WA near Port Townsend but it's not deeded. It's a great area and cool.

 

Keep in mind that Washington and Oregon can get hot in the mid to east areas. For cool temps you need to be along the coast.

 

http://www.rvparkstore.com/rv-lots-for-sale/washington/all

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Here is another web site that carries deeded RV lots for sale across the country. http://www.rvproperty.com/rv-lots/rv-lots-for-sale/

I can't help you with any specific properties, I found them all lacking in my needs and so I prefer to buy land and build my own. But there are deeded RV lots available in almost all states that one would consider for summer use.

Step 1 would seem to be to pick a specific area that fits your preferences for summer living.

For example my selection criteria includes: Any Temp over 80 is too hot for me, so I stick with the higher altitude Rocky Mtn states for my summer home bases. There must be nearby ATV trails and there must be nearby water (lake or river). The nearest neighbor must be at least 1/4 mile away. Any site within 30 miles of a larger city is disqualified from my list of potentials. your choices will differ from mine

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My brother in law has a residential lot in a very small town in central Alabama (no zoning issues). I needed a home base address for mail, banking, IRS, Social Security, etc. so he and I cut a deal. I pay him $75.00/month whether I am actually on the lot or not, but I have a permanent address. My mail that I can not convert to email comes to my local PO Box and a relative checks it weekly for important stuff I might need.

 

This works for me and my next door neighbor doesn't mine having my pad available for parking when I'm gone which is 8 months/year. In exchange for the parking he mows the grass.

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Just wanted to share a couple things I have found so far:

 

The Escapees park in Chimacum, WA received very good reviews on but doesn't have 50 amp. :(

 

http://www.rvparkreviews.com/regions/washington/chimacum

 

http://www.rollinrollin.com/evergreen/

 

For those wanting land for their RV and breathing room between neighbors this looked interesting: http://www.nwlands.com/id446.htm but as one poster mentioned the heat in mid to eastern Washington could be an issue in the summer?

 

I don't know that the beaches of Washington State are very warm but this community came up in my search: http://www.seabrookwa.com/washington-coast-area/

If we were to go back to sticks n bricks the beach would be very inviting. Don't know about the stairs but having the living area upstairs you can enjoy the view.

 

Will keep searching, thank you all for the ideas and links.

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We are looking for a place to eventually permanently park our fiver, build a patio around it and a carport over head. In our travels we have found several available for lease but not for sale. We want to be in a RV community and not just on a piece of land.

I agree with Jim2 that you need to first consider the criteria. Since we base in an RV community made up mostly of former fulltimers, I may be able to suggest some other things to consider.

First of all, does this mean a place that you can happily live year around and not travel any more? If so, you do need to consider things like all weather extremes and how they will effect you. Very few places that have no weather extremes so consider that carefully. If this is to be your last home base you may also want to consider how far you will be from your children/relatives. In our case we have sons in three different states so we had some choices but it is important to keep in mind that most people eventually reach a point in life where physical limitations begin to impact their ability to stay independent and in their homes and a relative near who can come to your aid when needed may become important. Very often this need forces people to move from their homes when they might have stayed longer if there had only been someone nearby.

 

I would also question just how vital it is that the real property be deeded and not some type of co-op or similar situation? In many cases the co-op has definite advantages over deeded property, as well as disadvantages. In terms of expenses, there is very little difference between a co-op or an HOA run community when things like septic & water systems are community owned and managed. Most of the retirement communities are operated as one of those two plans. There is a definite advantage to the retirement communities since the majority of them foster close friendships among neighbors and helping each other. That close connection between neighbors can often mean the difference between staying in your home late in life and being forced to move into assisted living.

 

If we were to go back to sticks n bricks the beach would be very inviting. Don't know about the stairs but having the living area upstairs you can enjoy the view.

When age and infirmity begins to play a part in your life, stairs are not your friend! Most senior housing has few if any stairs and ramps in most cases where level changes can't be avoided. Living with a spouse who has now had an ankle & a hip replaced and neighbors all around who have had knees replaced, I can assure you that a single level home is far less problem in recovery from orthopedic surgeries. In addition, consider one that is wheelchair accessible throughout, especially the bedroom & bathroom. Even the use of a walker after surgery is difficult with narrow doors and stairs. These problems become far greater challenges for one whose spouse is no longer living, which is a consideration that each of us will one day be faced with.

 

While I have no knowledge of your age of physical condition, I can tell you from experience that these maladies can arrive when least expected and with very little forewarning. Better to plan for them and never have the problem, than to find yourself unable to manage in your home.

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Always sage advice, thank you Kirk,

 

We love our fifth wheel and are thinking of parking it permanently in a summer destination and driving a car between it and place we have in the desert. The desert home is our long term plan. We don't spend much time there now but knew when the time came we may need something quickly and didn't want to be burdened with those decisions as we would probably have our hands full with other issues. We enjoy the desert October/November thru April/May but 90 degrees is our cutoff for heat and 40 is our cut off for the cold

 

None of the SKP Co-ops are in a place we would consider except maybe Washington but it is an older park with no 50 amp and less roomy sites. My concern with leased lots is the price going up. Our friends parents in Squim, WA leased a lot in an RV park for their park model several years ago at $250 a month and it has trippled in monthly rent since then making it unsellable.

 

We have no children so we are open to location. We would prefer not to drive more than 20 minutes to grocerys and services.

 

Very good point with stairs, our desert place is one level and 3 miles from medical care and a golf cart ride to groceries. We also have a group that looks after those in our 55+ community needing help, provides caregiver respite and assistance in finding necessary age related services.

 

Fortunately we count our blessings as we still have our health but know from caring for our parents you can either go quickly or it can be labored and lengthy. Avoidance of the issue caused my in-laws much pain and suffering in their later years, advance planning and discussion, though difficult at the time, made for a much smoother "golden years" and subsequent passing of my parents. The best gift my parents gave us was "the plan" we enjoyed much more quality time with them as they had outlined each step of the way. My in-laws inability to accept the inevitable struggled with a home not handicapable and fears that everyone was out to get them cutting themselves off from the world and negatively affecting their quality of life.

 

We are still pretty active but know we will slow (death and taxes as they say) to some degree and when we can no longer drive the warmth of the desert will be easier to take with A/C in the summer than a place needing heat for the winter and potentially icy walkways with slip and fall potential.

 

We are in transition staying more seasonally a month to 3 months at a time so know we need to start our discussion about where to live in the summer. There is no one perfect answer but the Escapee Cafeteria of Experiences is a great resource.

 

Thank you all for your comments and suggestions, much appreciated.

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Depending where your desert home is you might consider just going up in elevation for cool temperatures. For instance, if you're in southern Arizona, consider Show Low, Pinetop, Flagstaff, AZ. Fantastic summer temperatures and as you're aging it's a short drive to get there plus there are good medical facilities which is also an important consideration.

 

Regarding Chimacum Escapees Park, I'm not sure about the 50A....there are many new Park Models in the park with big air conditioners and washers. If you've never been there, it's worth checking out.

 

Good luck in finding your perfect spot!

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We've stayed at Juniper Ridge in Show Low, AZ. It's a nice park.

 

One thing be sure to check out - if Washington is a consideration for you...tsunamis. There are some areas along the coast that are very low and hence, you'll see many tsunami warning signs. Also, down the Oregon coast. We have friends that have a RV site around Ocean City. They did a drill on how fast they could make it to high ground. They didn't feel it was fast enough. The area is now building high towers for folks to climb in case of warnings.

 

Of course, many other areas of our country have hazards - tornados, earthquakes, fires, floods.

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We've stayed at Juniper Ridge in Show Low, AZ. It's a nice park.

 

One thing be sure to check out - if Washington is a consideration for you...tsunamis. There are some areas along the coast that are very low and hence, you'll see many tsunami warning signs. Also, down the Oregon coast. We have friends that have a RV site around Ocean City. They did a drill on how fast they could make it to high ground. They didn't feel it was fast enough. The area is now building high towers for folks to climb in case of warnings.

 

Of course, many other areas of our country have hazards - tornados, earthquakes, fires, floods.

 

 

Juniper Ridge is deeded lots did you know an owner to rent a site? Or just rent off their website?

 

Thank you for the info about the low lying coastal areas in Washington and Oregon; not having traveled there it is good to know.

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We thought we'd 'try it out' by renting a RV lot off their web site for a month. In the end, we just decided to quit RVing. There are a lot of very nice Park Models in the park. Personally, we thought they were overpriced so don't know how far they would come down. Good luck!

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  • 2 weeks later...

We thought we'd found the perfect lot in North Georgia mountains. Read over the Covenants carefully before the purchase. Even though we bought it sight unseen, once we saw it thought it would work perfectly. The RV Park has a large pond and is on a River. It was deeded, low taxes ($137 annually), low HOA ($462 annually) which covers water and garbage and Union County allowed you to live 12mos a year on it. Plus we can rent it out when we aren't using it.

 

It's cool enough in the Summer that many Floridians go there to escape the heat and humidity. Winters may get snow, but it never lasts long.

 

But then we bought a Truck Camper and found we not only can't store it on the lot, but can't use it on the lot when it's on the F450. Don't know why, since Covenants only specify no tents, no soft sided trailers or popups.

 

So we've just put the RV Lot up for sale and are going in a different direction.

 

http://janebaerrealty.com/listings/254985/lt52-rivers-edge-rv-blairsville#.VdX-cMvH8cQ

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The smaller sites at the Chimacum SKP park are the first sites they built, for the volunteer workers to stay on while they built the rest of the park. They're now the overnight sites and only have 30 amp service.

 

If you buy into the park, you'll get one of the larger sites. They're sometimes available for weekly or monthly rental (I was living in the area several years ago and rented one for a month while going through a divorce) and I'm pretty sure it had 50 amp service.

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Just wanted to share a couple things I have found so far:

 

The Escapees park in Chimacum, WA received very good reviews on but doesn't have 50 amp. :(

 

http://www.rvparkreviews.com/regions/washington/chimacum

 

http://www.rollinrollin.com/evergreen/

 

For those wanting land for their RV and breathing room between neighbors this looked interesting: http://www.nwlands.com/id446.htm but as one poster mentioned the heat in mid to eastern Washington could be an issue in the summer?

 

I don't know that the beaches of Washington State are very warm but this community came up in my search: http://www.seabrookwa.com/washington-coast-area/

If we were to go back to sticks n bricks the beach would be very inviting. Don't know about the stairs but having the living area upstairs you can enjoy the view.

 

Will keep searching, thank you all for the ideas and links.

 

 

 

 

 

Evergreen Coho in Chimacum does have 50 amp on the leasehold lots. Also, the official website can be found at http://www.evergreencohoskprvpark.com/

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we wanted to be central in the US so we bought a half acre in SD and set it up.this way we can stay on our own property and there is not anyone telling us what we can and cannot do.we leave the first of Nov when it starts to freeze and head south to Ariz.we have a garage and I built a sewing room for my wife.go to google earth 308 S Main St Mount Vernon,Sd to see but the sewing room had not been built when they did the picture.if all goes well in a few weeks we will be putting it up for sale.

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we wanted to be central in the US so we bought a half acre in SD and set it up.this way we can stay on our own property and there is not anyone telling us what we can and cannot do.we leave the first of Nov when it starts to freeze and head south to Ariz.we have a garage and I built a sewing room for my wife.go to google earth 308 S Main St Mount Vernon,Sd to see but the sewing room had not been built when they did the picture.if all goes well in a few weeks we will be putting it up for sale.

Looks to me like a good way to answer any questions raised by the Patriot Act as well. If we were still full-timing I'd be watching for details of your sale.

 

Linda Sand

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