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2007 VED12 will not start


bigredhdt

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After parking for about a week, I tried to start the truck, cranked a little and then just a click. Tested batteries and found 2 bad, replace all 4. Tried again with new batteries and turned a little, now won't do anything. I measured voltage at starter when trying to start, drops to about 11.5. I removed the starter (not for the faint of heart) and took to a shop for bench testing. They say the starter is good, but they did not load test it. Is that a good test? Prior to the problem, I have been experiencing slow cranking and intermittent no crank. Could this be an engine problem?

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I would look real close at all the plus and minus connections. (positive and ground) The electricity needs BOTH paths to complete the circuit.

 

You might need a helper or longer jumper clips but the best place to test the voltage while starting is across the starter and not at the battery. It still sounds like a low voltage condition.

 

On edit:

 

Morning Jim - LOL corrosion is always your enemy on any thing. Frame, door panels radiators.

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Test was at the starter. the batteries are joined by a flat plate rather than cables. I thoroughly cleaned the plates and cable ends when I changed batteries and before removing the starter. How can I test to see if the starter is bad? No load testing really only ensures that the bendix is working and the motor is not dead. under load these motors draw 1500 amps, so a ~1 volt drop is not out of the question. Using jumper cables is not a realistic test. The only thing I can think is to buy some new cables and bolt to starter and batteries to check it. Any thoughts?

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Sorry Jim - I was referring to cables to extend the meter so that you can see it while trying to start. Totally agree on the power jumper cables!! I was talking about measuring delivered voltage to the starter while it is under load. You probably have a bad end (terminal) somewhere, or the starter went bad.

 

A buddy of mine had his starter go bad and he got a reduction gear replacement, said it made a world of difference. You really only have 3 things there, batteries, starter, cables. New batts, one down. Voltage test at the starter (power post and starter frame), 2 down.

 

Best of luck with it.

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Funny (well not so funny when you can't start) your thread pops up just the day after I pulled my four batteries out of the Freightshaker for the 6 month wash & wax the batteries and battery-box drill...... Just for grins I check each battery voltage before I start the work and the odd thing is that the two driver-side batteries were almost a full volt higher than the passenger side bats..........How could that be the case since ALL four batteries are SUPPOSED to be tied together..........

 

Well, the "tie-bolt" on the + inter-tie cable was arced almost in half and the slag had "insulated" the out-going positive cables (2) so that the two battery banks were "insulated" from each other with the 'pass-side-bats" being pretty much out of the loop......

 

Well the Freightshaker has a small 11 liter M11 Cummins so two-driver-side-bats were doing a serviceable job in cranking the engine.

 

So......I disconnect ALL battery cable connections and clean all connections then install a new inter-tie bolt and spray corrosion inhibitor on ALL connection points...........

 

I reconnect the battery minder and then check all voltages this morning..... all are even.......

 

I turn the key and WOW I forgot how fast 4,000 Amps can spin a small 11 liter engine over........

 

Starting batteries are items that we tend not to notice until things wont start or are sloooow to crank....

 

The battery wash / wax is not much fun...... but almost always I find something that does need attention.......

 

Hope the new starter helps.......

 

Drive on......(after a good start.....)

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Mitsubishi gear reduction starters are the way to go.

 

Curt

I've installed three starters in the past three years. (Two semis and one farm tractor.) One was the Mitsubishi gear reduction unit. If I had it to do over, all three would have been that type.

 

Okay, I must be honest here. I installed one, and much younger brother did the other two........ :D

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Put a delco 39mt(gear reduction) in, can't believe what it does. This was an otr truck before I bought it in 2013. I just thought the starter spun the engine slowly because it was so big, but it always started. This new starter turns the engine like it's a 4 cylinder. I would bet the old Mitsubishi was the old, tired, original starter.

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After thinking about testing the wire, I came up with a way to do it, but you need a clamp on amp meter and a voltmeter. You will need to have some try and start the truck, one to watch the voltmeter and amp probe. Start the truck and observe the peak amps and minimum volts. The voltmeter needs to have on lead on the battery end of the cable and the other on the starter end. The you can calculate the wire resistance. Voltage divided by the current.

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Just to be clear, delco as in ac delco. I wouldn't call that a clone. The delco sheet shows more torque over the rpm range than the Mitsubishi and it was cheaper than the Mitsubishi from the Volvo dealer.

unfortunately theres clones of just about every brand reduction starters. ive seen them with the big name logo and WERE a clone.... and cant really trust the parts guy to be

honest with ya either.

 

generally the cheaper the reduction starter , the higher the chance its a clone.

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