Jump to content

Frig gone crazy!


rebntx

Recommended Posts

The frig in my 2012 Blackwood (by Thor) won't work on AC. It posts an alert flashing, "Lo DC". DC lights on that side of two slides wouldn't work. Then AC would come on for a while, then go off, again flashing 'Lo DC'. Switched to LP and it wouldn't work...til later LP began working. Meanwhile we lost all food in the frig. LP working now...cooling as it should, but AC won't work. DC lights now working on that side. If I switch to AC, it now flashes 'AC', then 'AU'. Switch back to LP and it works. Rig is level, so I don't think that's the problem. It's a Norcold frig. Batteries are full. Dealer will want me to bring it back in for the fourth time in several months! (Earlier repairs were for thermostat on Furnace/AC, bad jack, etc.)

 

Any idea what's going on with my frig?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sounds like our Old (very low-hours) " NO-COLD" Non-Fridge........these are the worst thing that ever happened to the RV life.......

 

Owning a "NO-COLD" is like living in Europe..........You can't ever have enough $$$$$ to make things work......

 

Over a year ago we threw the "NO-COLD" out and installed a ELECTRONIC FRIGIDAIRE Model FFTR1222QB and the freezer has NEVER been above -10f since.

 

This fridge cost $449 and has a ONE YEAR Warranty (for a little $$ you can extend to 7 yr) AND any Home Depot can replace it in 5 minutes.

 

Being Electronic it draws FAR less electricity than the "NO-COLD" even on propane.......and it is listed run time at 65f (room Temp) is 18% to 35% and at 90f room temp run time listed is 30% to 70%....... we have seen far less run times in real operations.

 

This ELECTRONIC fridge has Soft-Start and variable ramp up / down power features so it never has a large start load that taxes the DC Inverter and wastes power. We have measured running power as low as 20W and never over 90W for short periods.....

 

Win, Win, Win.

 

We have run 21 days Boondocking on a tiny inverter (200 W) and still had plenty of battery left on a single group 31....

 

The only down-side ........Ice Cream is pretty tough to scoop at -10f.........

 

Drive on.......(nice and cold....)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sounds like our Old (very low-hours) " NO-COLD" Non-Fridge........these are the worst thing that ever happened to the RV life.......

 

Owning a "NO-COLD" is like living in Europe..........You can't ever have enough $$$$$ to make things work......

 

Over a year ago we threw the "NO-COLD" out and installed a ELECTRONIC FRIGIDAIRE Model FFTR1222QB and the freezer has NEVER been above -10f since.

 

This fridge cost $449 and has a ONE YEAR Warranty (for a little $$ you can extend to 7 yr) AND any Home Depot can replace it in 5 minutes.

 

Being Electronic it draws FAR less electricity than the "NO-COLD" even on propane.......and it is listed run time at 65f (room Temp) is 18% to 35% and at 90f room temp run time listed is 30% to 70%....... we have seen far less run times in real operations.

 

This ELECTRONIC fridge has Soft-Start and variable ramp up / down power features so it never has a large start load that taxes the DC Inverter and wastes power. We have measured running power as low as 20W and never over 90W for short periods.....

 

Win, Win, Win.

 

We have run 21 days Boondocking on a tiny inverter (200 W) and still had plenty of battery left on a single group 31....

 

The only down-side ........Ice Cream is pretty tough to scoop at -10f.........

 

Drive on.......(nice and cold....)

 

How exactly was this post helpful to answering the question?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is usually the control board on these things. If it is and you need to replace it I'd suggest the Dinosaur brand. Here is their webpage: http://dinosaurelectronics.com/ Their Support page is here: http://dinosaurelectronics.com/Cust_Service.htm Click on trouble shooting and the FAQs. The website is clear and easy to follow to narrow down your issues. Let us know what you find.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Loose connection in 1 of the junction boxes under the slide. There'll be one on the body side, where the transition to extension cord material is made, and one under the slide, where the wiring transitions back to individual wires. The light wouldn't be on the same circuit as the fridge.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

How exactly was this post helpful to answering the question?

Look at Hundreds of RV "No-Cold" failure posts.........RV Propane / DC fridges are in a constant mode of progressive-failure from the first hour of operation.....

 

The answer to the "question" is that the problems with RV fridges is not will they fail.......it is.......how many times are you willing to endure continued failures.........

 

Why is it that virtually ALL high-end RV's now are equipped with Residential Fridges........Simple........They work well and they rarely fail.......

 

Drive on..........(with frozen ice cream......)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any idea what's going on with my frig?

 

 

Look at Hundreds of RV "No-Cold" failure posts.........RV Propane / DC fridges are in a constant mode of progressive-failure from the first hour of operation.....

 

The answer to the "question" is that the problems with RV fridges is not will they fail.......it is.......how many times are you willing to endure continued failures.........

 

Why is it that virtually ALL high-end RV's now are equipped with Residential Fridges........Simple........They work well and they rarely fail.......

 

Drive on..........(with frozen ice cream......)

 

Once again, does not address the question.

 

It seems like every time someone posts a question about their fridge, some of the "residential fridge" fans has to chime in like it's a badge of honor to own one. I agree that RV fridges give more problems than residential fridges, but I see nothing productive in making hysterical posts about it when someone seeks help with their RV fridge.

 

My Norcold has been in constant operation for seven years and I have monitored the temperature that entire time. I have never seen the refrigerator section higher than 42F, and that was after loading groceries after a shopping trip. My ice cream is frozen, I've never had a single food item spoil from getting warm. If this fridge quits working, I may replace it with a residential fridge, but until then I'm a happy camper.

 

I'll go a step further and say that I've owned over a dozen RV's over the years and never had a fridge failure in any of them. I think there are many more people out there who have had satisfactory performance like myself.

 

Sorry to contribute to this thread hijack.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

chirakawa, you are lucky, 3 of our close friends (us included) had our fridges die 2 winters ago. Four of them lost theirs this past winter. They all had a coolant leak.

 

rvreb, I suggest you find the AC and or DC power problem first then the fridge, IF it still is a problem. I suspect there is an intermittent power connection to the slides or on one side of your RV. Use a voltage meter and start to move, jiggle, and vibrate the junction boxes and connections and circuit breakers for AC and fuses for DC. Greg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

 

Once again, does not address the question.

 

It seems like every time someone posts a question about their fridge, some of the "residential fridge" fans has to chime in like it's a badge of honor to own one. I agree that RV fridges give more problems than residential fridges, but I see nothing productive in making hysterical posts about it when someone seeks help with their RV fridge.

 

My Norcold has been in constant operation for seven years and I have monitored the temperature that entire time. I have never seen the refrigerator section higher than 42F, and that was after loading groceries after a shopping trip. My ice cream is frozen, I've never had a single food item spoil from getting warm. If this fridge quits working, I may replace it with a residential fridge, but until then I'm a happy camper.

 

I'll go a step further and say that I've owned over a dozen RV's over the years and never had a fridge failure in any of them. I think there are many more people out there who have had satisfactory performance like myself.

 

Sorry to contribute to this thread hijack.

Not guilty of thread hijack Chirakawa...... you stated it simply "I agree that RV fridges give more problems than residential fridges,".

 

Like you I have had RV fridges that worked (somewhat) for many years.......my problem is that I managed a company that had a fair size fleet of RV's so I had way too many fridges to keep operational........

 

Sure you can get "lucky" for a period of time but the odds of failure are against you.......it's a fact.

 

Ok Rvreb.....there is good news....... IF you desire to keep your RV fridge.....and that good news is that a Huge RV Service industry has "grown-up" as more and more RV fridges fail.......no longer are you "tied" to the OEM fridge makers........no the net is chocked full of folks that will sell all kinds of "fixes" for your fridge (some of these "fixes" are called out in this thread).

 

Even better news is that almost any RV dealer of any size likely has a service department that has likely seen tons of RV fridge failures and they will likely be able to service your fridge in short order.

 

Refrigeration is a simple concept, like most concepts......."the devil is in the details"......

 

Many "fridge threads" often have suggestions of how to trouble-shoot and or how to simply start replace various components until you get lucky.....And of course there is always Utube and it is chock-full of "fridge-fixes".

 

I do know this.... we parked our RV near a 1800 space RV park in Yuma, AZ last Nov-Dec and I chatted with three Full-time (winter-season) mobile RV fridge service men and they were booked SOLID ALL winter-season.

 

I ask the oldest of the service men is the fridge business always that busy, he chuckled and said, "oh ya, it's been good enough that I have just put my last of four kids through collage and........if the degrees don't work out ......they all know how to make good money fixing fridges..........

 

Listen I feel your pain, spoiled food should not the highlight of the RV Lifestyle......

 

The res-fridge not a badge of honor thing .........it is just another way to skin-the-cat and it is working well for more and more RV folks.....

 

Hope things cool off for you soon.

 

Drive on......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When it flashes AU - that is automatic which means it will switch between electric or gas based on what is available. Sounds like it was doing what it should. Let it flash to AU and leave it alone - what happens? Oh, if you have low dc, your control board will not work correctly, nor your frig.

How is your battery?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have had many RVs over the years and have experienced only one major RV refrigerator failure and that one was after 10 years of fulltime use! I wonder what it is that we are doing wrong? :D

 

Getting back to the question at hand, I too think that there may be a 12V-dc problem. The dimming lights tend to support that theory and the refrigerator uses 12V-dc for the control circuits whether it is operating on propane or on 120V-ac power. The propane & 120V are just heat sources and the controls require 12V for either one to operate. Did you happen to open or close the slide just before the problem took place, and/or at the time it began to work again?

 

Which model of Norcold do you have? The model number would help to locate the right service manual for it. And once you know the model number, you may want to visit the website of Bryant RV and download a copy of the service manual which will give you an explanation for the various error codes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have had 5 RV's over the last 12 years and only one of the RV fridge's has actually failed. It sprung a leak and lost all the coolant and we replaced the fridge with a new one.

 

I'm not saying any of the RV refrigerators kept things as cold as a residential fridge, they didn't. However they worked just fine.

 

If you install a residential fridge you MUST have the battery capacity and the ability to keep the batteries charged at all times. Not a problem as long as you spend most all your time at places with electric hook ups. But, if you plan on dry camping or boondocking for days/weeks at a time you must plan for a way to keep your batteries charged.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi rvreb

Based on your symptoms, I would look for a poor ground. DC power seems to vary with slide deployment and affect multiple things.

With a loss of 12VDC power is gone zero zip nada. With a bad ground there are several possible paths to ground through various loads. Symptoms can become bizarre.

To confirm:

Use a long jumper to supply a good ground to the fridge.

Then move the jumper to supply good 12VDC.

If you have a bad connection this should point you to where your issue is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

RV repair person found two resisters measuring 75 each. Should be 51-50. Norcold approved haivng them replaced and the two resisters are on order. Cost of resisters is covered by warranty, but, alas, the service charge ($95) is not...oh well.

 

Now I've discovered the seals on the slide out at top are rotting out. Dang!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

Our program provides accurate individual wheel weights for your RV, toad, and tow vehicle, and will help you trim the pounds if you need to.

Dish For My RV.

RV Cable Grip

RV Cable Grip

All the water you need...No matter where you go

Country Thunder Iowa

Nomad Internet

Rv Share

RV Air.

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.

The Rvers- Now Streaming

RVTravel.com Logo



×
×
  • Create New...