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Camper killed by gunfire.


ed6713

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PIKE NATIONAL FOREST- A-60-year old man was shot and killed while camping with his family Friday night. It happened in a secluded campground near Woodland Park.

 

The Douglas County Sheriffs Office believes the man have been struck by a stray bullet fired off around 6:30 p.m. It is not believed to be an intentional act at this time. However, that has not been ruled out, the Douglas County Sheriffs Office said in a news release.

 

Signs near the entrance of the Rainbow Falls Campground warn visitors that shooting is illegal, but when FOX31 Denver visited the site Sunday you could hear gunshots nearby. Shotgun casing could also be found on several trails near the campsite where the man was killed.

 

The Sheriffs Office is asking for the public to help identify anyone who was in the area shooting a high-powered rifle.

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Sad situation, and condolences to the family.

However, anytime you are in a remote area for any reason, you are putting yourself in that potential position. Extremely rare odds of it happening, but it can. (assuming it was an accident)

I was camping last weekend and the campground had a sign stating no firearms......I wonder how many folks had firearms in their campers..... A lot I would guess..

Cheers,

Bob

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Just down the street from us.

 

The issue with stray gunfire is a serious one. We have open shooting areas in the forest and people go out and shoot there. Myself included from time to time. Unfortunately, not everyone is a safe shooter. I'll leave it at that. While it is rare for someone to be killed with a stray shot it does happen. If you are shooting, YOU are responsible for that bullet. KNOW where it is going.

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I was a competitive IPSC/IDPA shooter and found that even most competitive shooters should not carry anything more dangerous than a cap pistol. I was a Range Master at two NM State IPSC Championships and found the weapons handling to be execrable. Most people out shooting in the forests have no concept of utilzing a back stop when shooting and making sure that no one is downrange.

Reed and Elaine

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While I've not done much competitive shooting, I have burned a lot of ammunition on the range over the years and was for some time a frequent hunter and I'd agree that there are some who are not responsible, I still believe that the vast majority are, at least for the most part. The problem is that guns are just one more of those things which only need one irresponsibility act or owner's lapse for someone to be harmed But that same thing can be said for driving or a host of other activities that are far less controversial.

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One of the primary safety rules is to always know your backstop/where the bullet will end up. I've seen it too. Squirrel hunters shooting 22s up into trees, big game hunters shooting up at a ridgeline. Folks fail to realize that even the lowly .22LR can and does travel up to two miles.

Rifle munitions maximum ranges by caliber: http://homestudy.ihea.com/ammo/20cartridges.htm

Handgun: http://homestudy.ihea.com/ammo/21handgunchart.htm

Shotgun: http://homestudy.ihea.com/ammo/22shotguun.htm

 

I was in Colorado in 75-78 at the Academy in the Springs when the Division of Wildlife was just getting the first mandatory hunter safety two day training program in the nation off the ground. I joined the Division of Wildlife as a hunter safety instructor for the Academy personnel and Cadets to accommodate our crazy schedules. I remember many armed Division of Wildlife enforcement officers and thought of Colorado as one of the safest. It was certainly safer than down here where there were none.

 

We know the area well too as our Farish Memorial Park rec area and trout pond is up there too but much more South of that park. While fulltiming we stopped at the Academy FamCamp several times to visit our friends.

 

Lots of the local Hunter safety instructors in the 80s here just told a bunch of war stories more than taught hunter safety. I got my Hunter Safety Instructor patch here too, but gave it up after I retired. I taught it at the Scout Ranch where me and my Combat Arms troops volunteered every summer to run their shooting programs for most of the 1980's. During my college break in service I held the Council's shooting merit badge program at a range I taught civilian handgun defense shooting. http://www.norwela.org/Reservation/

 

I hope the enforcement officers in those areas they hear gunshots in, that should not have shooting, get back to their once fearsome to forest law breakers level of activity. Have they dropped the mandatory two day classes there Jack?

 

That's truly sad.

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My late mother-in-law was nearly killed by a neighbor shooting on the hill where they both lived as she was walking a trail with her dog. Once she made it safely home, she did some thinking then called and asked him if he got a new gun. He was appalled to learn he nearly shot her. I sure hope that changed his behavior in the future. Think before shooting, please.

 

Linda Sand

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I gave up hunting mainly due to a lot of stupid gun shooters. (I refuse to call them hunters) He came out of the woods to the road and told us about the "sound" shot he almost took. We thought he meant a good solid shot when actually he said he was about to shoot when the noise stopped.(sound stopped).

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"Most" hunters are careful and follow reasonable safety precautions. "Many" shooters do as well. But I have to say that there are plenty of scary people that are both "hunters" and "shooters". They give other firearm owners a bad name.

 

I'm not one to restrict firearm ownership or use. But I do wish people would get some training and actually practice some of what they are taught.

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Sad situation, and condolences to the family.

However, anytime you are in a remote area for any reason, you are putting yourself in that potential position. Extremely rare odds of it happening, but it can. (assuming it was an accident)

I was camping last weekend and the campground had a sign stating no firearms......I wonder how many folks had firearms in their campers..... A lot I would guess..

Cheers,

Bob

I've always wondered if that meant outside the RV. I always travel with my Colt 45 by my seat (and, yes, I do check state gun laws) and have stayed at many that say no firearms. Some also say no alcohol, but I'm sure that stops people from drinking inside.

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I was camping last weekend and the campground had a sign stating no firearms......I wonder how many folks had firearms in their campers..... A lot I would guess..

 

 

I hunt birds and always carry a shotgun during hunting season. Never carry off-season.

 

I was having lunch with a Forest Service law enforcement officer and a couple of folks that worked throughout the entire west.

 

I was shocked to learn that 80% of the people carried in their estimation.

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"Most" hunters are careful and follow reasonable safety precautions. "Many" shooters do as well. But I have to say that there are plenty of scary people that are both "hunters" and "shooters". They give other firearm owners a bad name.

 

I'm not one to restrict firearm ownership or use. But I do wish people would get some training and actually practice some of what they are taught.

 

Totally agree Jack,

I have permits to carry in ~39 states, not counting the non permit required states.

Years back when I got my first permit, the course was (12) hours. (8) classroom and (4) on the firing range.

My state now will give a permit to those who have a firearms safety course, which is a few hours and NO actual firing. Wrong..

We learned a lot of the legal responsibilities/liabilities of carrying that are very important....one being that with a CCW you are NOT a policeman...and cannot act accordingly...it is for your personal (or family) protection only.

I also practice a lot with the firearms that I carry.

Cheers,

Bob

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I had a CCW once and it required a 12 hours course and range "qualification'. Qualification was slow fire at an IPSC (military D) target at 5 and 7 meters. You had to "qualify" with every firearm you might require. These firearms were on the card. Most of those in the course had a hard time keeping rounds on target at 7 meters. One guy was able to do OK with his S&W .38 Special but could not hit the target with the equivalent S&W firing .357 . Another hit neither target with his Derringer. So almost all rounds in a serious situation would go down range addressed "to whom it may concern!" The instructor and I had competed for years in IDPA.

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If one is to have weapons in a campground that says NO WEAPONS; hopefully they would have enough common since to keep them secured out of sight and trigger locked should someone break in while not occupied. I have been asked before by others if I have a weapon in my RV. I just say: come in without my permission and you may find out. In other words it is none of thier business.

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