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>iving in TT


jeb101

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I had a small TT a few years back and am now looking to living in one full time.

 

As I live north of Charlotte, NC, we do have some cold wx - down into the teens at times but does not last -and up to 100 in the summer. Would like to keep both winter and summer costs down.

 

I will be living by myself with 2 cats.

 

The unit will be parked behind my home which my son and his family are moving into.

 

Any/all recommendations about size, brands or any other suggestions would be appreciated. - jb

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If you're not planning on moving it for some time I would definitely skirt it, regardless which brand you decide on. Look for one with good insulation. The new Sprinters by Keystone have an upgraded 0 degree to 100 degree insulation package and they are really nice, with lots of room inside. http://www.keystonerv.com/sprinter-wide-body/

 

Chip

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Skirting for sure and consider blocking the frame for additional stability. Don't skip putting something like PVC cutting boards under the tires too, you don't want them to rot.

 

You might find adding a window awning on any west or south facing windows helps with cooling costs. If the patio awning gives useful shade putting it out with a good tie-down system to deal with wind is also a possibility to look into. Adding some of the self-stick interior storm window film will sure help in the winter.

 

Making a front porch is really handy for keeping the mud out in wet weather unless you have access from pavement. A simple one built of 2x4 or 2x6 and 3/4 marine plywood and a couple coats of waterproof paint works well.

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Welcome to the Escapee forums! Good to have you with us.

 

You were asking about the size of RV needed and that is a pretty subjective issue and varies widely from one person to the next. I think that you will need something with a separate living and sleeping area and beyond that it is partly your preference and even your physical size. You want one that is large enough for comfort. You should also look for one that is rated for "all season" use as many are only intended for use in warm weather. Things like double pane windows and extra insulation, enclosed and heated waste tanks are all very important.

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Tks, Kirk - any suggestions on how to get best deal?

 

Have looked at Keystone's Sprinters - very nice units and the longer ones have a "residential" frig which seems a very nice way to go. Don't know if this has been offered in years past or just the 2015's. - jb

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...The unit will be parked behind my home which my son and his family are moving into...

If the trailer is never going to be used for travel, a park model or a small mobile home might be a better choice.

 

Have you checked for any local, county or state regulations that might affect your being able to live in an RV fulltime on the property or have more than one occupied dwelling on the property?

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I believe that the suggestion of considering a park model is a very good one. Those are delivered with the refrigerator, toilet and such all the same as in a home since they are designed to be permanently connected to all utilities. They also have the home type of air conditioning that sits on a pad next to the house and so is much less noisy than the on-roof air conditioners of the typical RV. They also do not have the waste tanks or fresh water tanks which are vital to the RV traveler but are just an extra problem for the RV that sits in one spot permanently. An RV really isn't designed to be used sitting in one spot for years but the park models are.

 

To get a good price you must first explore what a good price is for the RV that you plan to buy. The only way that I know of to do this is by doing a great deal of looking, by exploring the prices listed at many dealers via the internet and by looking up the possible RVs on the NADA used price guide on the internet or better yet at the local library. If you are buying new you can make some competition by finding the specific model you want and then contacting several dealers over a large area and make them bid against each other. But doing the bid thing may make you unwelcome at the local dealer if you need warranty work.

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