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Slide needs a push to get started


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The past few months I have to push the long slide on my 2004 Jayco 5W to get it started sliding in- and the motor seems weaker sliding-in. The RV underside is covered and there is no emergency access for manual open/close. I use shore power until I drive away since my 5 yr old batteries need changing.

Anything I can try before dropping it off at the dealer? Thanks.

 

Rob

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Replace the batteries as you know they are old and not holding a good charge. The slides and feet are 12v and need good batteries to work well. Shore power, 120v AC, powers the converter which charges the batteries but the converter does not put out sufficient 12v for the heavy duty needs of the slides and feet. Greg

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Replace the batteries as you know they are old and not holding a good charge. The slides and feet are 12v and need good batteries to work well. Shore power, 120v AC, powers the converter which charges the batteries but the converter does not put out sufficient 12v for the heavy duty needs of the slides and feet. Greg

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I will add this to the discussion. The motor on my really large slide really has to work hard to get the slide up "over the hump" when it first starts to come in. I take all of the weight off of the inside of the slide I can before starting to "in" process ---- like the four chairs that have many things stored under the seats. I ask a man at the factory if it would be all right was me to push from the outside as it starts in --- until it gets over the hump. (wife operating the controls) He said that it would be fine and that it would be safe to do that. Do you agree? (electric slides)

C. S.

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You could turn up the power in the potentiometer which controls the amount of power your slides are given. It's like a thermostat. Too much power and bolts could be sheared off. is this a recent problem or has it always been like this?

Just saw CF's response. My dining room slide kicks out after coming in a couple of inches so I start it again and grab the inside of the face frame and pull to help it.

 

If you don't know what or where the potentiometer is ask and I or others can send a picture with instructions. It should be Beige for the older ones and probably Black for the newer models.

 

There will be a very small screw with a slot in it. Use one of your very best and expensive steak knives to adjust screw in very small increments.

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Usually the controller for the slide motor has a current sensor that shuts off the motor when it draws a level of current. This is how the controller knows the slide has reached its limits.

 

Sometimes you need to tweak the current limit setting as the system ages over time. The potentiometer is very sensitive and you need to move it very little for each adjustment. If you over do it, the controller can overdrive the slide at it limit, either in or out.

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With any DC motor the power that it has is based upon available current & voltage. With a 12V-DC system the voltage will drop if power demand exceeds the ability of the source to supply current (amps). In motors the starting current to get it turning is always greater than current once it begins to run. With RV systems the battery is usually the source of that extra starting current but if batteries are in poor condition they may not be capable of making up the needed starting current. Those who are suggesting that you first replace the battery are probably right on about the cause of your problems. You might try borrowing a known good battery to put into the system first just to see if that doesn't solve the problem.

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Let's look at the pieces here:

  • You know your batteries are weak, which means they lack the ability to hold voltage/current.
  • Your slide motor is not unlike a starter motor, it needs good voltage and current to do its job.
  • Without a battery, the battery charge system is woefully short of enough juice to run the slide motor.
  • This means your system takes both the weak batteries and the the charge system combined to muster enough juice to feed the slide motor.

Before modifying the system to allow more current that isn't available right now (like clamping a faucet full open when the pump is bad), or letting the shop charge you $100 per hour to filet your 5'er to find a false alarm, one might consider first addressing the one thing in your face that you know is an issue.

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I'd go with replacing the battery before you try any adjustments. With a bad one, you might not get a repeatable setpoint.

Fix what you know is bad first. The rest of the problems might coincidentally disappear.

Russ

I totally agree. Fix what you know is wrong first.

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