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Not Enough Tow Vehicle


AlCherry

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Out traveling this weekend, between Flagstaff and Kingman, AZ, I saw two cases where there was just not enough truck for the RV they were towing. If you are familiar with that piece of I40, you know that there are a few areas that have 6% grades that wind through canyons, with gusty winds.

One case was a Tacoma pickup pulling a 25' bumper hitch. Nose in the air, and he was on the edge of a catastrophic crash. And he had his family in the truck. The second case was a Ford Explorer doing the same thing. There were too many cases of people running the 75 mph on factory RV tires.

I know you and I can't do anything about it, but damn, what will it take to educate people about weights, speed and tires?

Rant off.

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Unfortunately it will take a person getting into a personal accident before they see the light, the longer they get away with it the farther reality slips from their mind.


what will it take to educate people about weights, speed and tires?

Rant off.

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This past winter, we were coming back from shopping in Blythe, CA, headed east on I-10 to Quartzsite. A truck pulling a travel trailer passed us and, shortly, started to fish tail. The trailer was fish tailing so badly, that I was sure we were going to see a roll over accident. Fortunately, for the driver, passengers, and everyone else sharing the road, he was able to get it under control.

 

We noticed that he got off at the first Quartzsite exit...I imagine to change into a clean pair of underwear! :o

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On I-55 south from Memphis Tn to Jackson Ms, I see overloaded trucks daily. I was passed Thursday by a F-250 pulling doubles, a long Montana with a bass boat on the back. I was cruising 65-68mph and he overtook me, passed and pulled away. I figure he was doing 75+ easily.

I see so many 2500/250 trucks squatted down hauling big 5th wheels, and then a Toyota Tacoma short bed, hauling a 30' travel trailer... Dealers will sell anyone anything.

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Most people that are towing and not retired do not know the first thing about ST tire speed ratings. I know I did not know for over 30 years and would tow at the speed limit and was fat, dumb and happy, I was use to car and truck tires being able to run at speed limit without any problems and just assumed that trailer tires could also. I do not know if it was in this forum or another that I first read about a 62 MPH rating on 90% of the (almost all stock) ST tires. The first year I retired I was driving 70 MPH across the deep south in 100+ degree outside temperatures and blew three tires in two days managed to limp into NC and replaced all 4 tires got home and started reading about ST tires and learned about 6 year life expectancy and the 62 MPH speed rating. So when I was working and only towed a 1000 miles a year I did not have many tire problems and never learned about ST tires.

 

Many RV owners have no idea about ST tires and there is no one to really teach them, maybe people towing boats and horses a lot, know but they all travel in different circles. Think about it how long did you tow before you learned about them and where/how did you learn about them? I think all dealers should take the time to explain the tire limitations, but none do or at least have a pamphlet telling all the restrictions. Then you would still have to problem with a new buyer buying from an individual. Is that something some group should do? Maybe camping clubs (Good Sams, KOA or even Escapees) or say Camping World should provide for their members/customers? Maybe RVIA should take it on to create the pamphlet and provide at costs to every tow-able manufacture to be provided with each unit built. That would be a start at least they could also provide them to dealers and Camping World and clubs.

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Here's an interesting link by Goodyear where they advise adding 10 psi to their ST Marathons for speed in the 66-70 mph range (with a few disclaimers). http://www.tirerack.com/images/tires/goodyear/Marathon_Special_Trailer_Applications.pdf

 

Goodyear states "If Goodyear tires, with the ST designation, are used at speeds between 66 and 75 mph (106 km/h and 120 km/h), we recommend the cold inflation pressure be increased by 10 psi (70 kPa) above the recommended pressure based on the trailer placard for normal inflation and load conditions."

 

According to this article it also reduces your tire's load carrying capacity by 10% too. http://rvtipoftheday.com/rv-trailers/travel-trailer-tire-speed-ratings

 

Chip

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I would blame the RV dealer more than the truck dealer. Your buying a truck that has a lot of uses, the dealer doesnt per say know your going to tow a monster RV with it, however an RV dealer knows how heavy the unit is they are selling you and know what your coming to pick it up in. Chances are they are installing a hitch in it before hand also.

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Many RV owners have no idea about ST tires and there is no one to really teach them, maybe people towing boats and horses a lot, know but they all travel in different circles. Think about it how long did you tow before you learned about them and where/how did you learn about them? I think all dealers should take the time to explain the tire limitations, but none do or at least have a pamphlet telling all the restrictions. Then you would still have to problem with a new buyer buying from an individual. Is that something some group should do? Maybe camping clubs (Good Sams, KOA or even Escapees) or say Camping World should provide for their members/customers? Maybe RVIA should take it on to create the pamphlet and provide at costs to every tow-able manufacture to be provided with each unit built. That would be a start at least they could also provide them to dealers and Camping World and clubs.

 

I believe your heart is in the right place, but these organizations you mention along with others are in the business of selling tires or selling ad space to tire manufacturers. I don't think there is any way that they will say/print anything to discourage you from buying these junk tires.

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I have enough of everything. Truck, tires, axles, brakes etc.

 

But, like the rest of folks, I've seen it many times!! I don't know that I'll pull off like Yarome, and at 60 mph slowing down some more is well, really slow, but, I will watch carefully until the are out of sight, then look for smoke in the distance.

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Regarding dealers, we bought our current trailer, '98 38' HH Champagne in Yuma in '98. Dealer, RV World, also sold same size trailer to another purchaser. When we arrived to change out our '91 HH, this guy showed up with a F150 and wanted a hitch installed. Sales manager refused, and told him if he returned with a hitch in his truck, they would move the trailer to the service road and he would not be allowed on the lot with the rig. Don't know what the outcome was.

 

Jim

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Regarding dealers, we bought our current trailer, '98 38' HH Champagne in Yuma in '98. Dealer, RV World, also sold same size trailer to another purchaser. When we arrived to change out our '91 HH, this guy showed up with a F150 and wanted a hitch installed. Sales manager refused, and told him if he returned with a hitch in his truck, they would move the trailer to the service road and he would not be allowed on the lot with the rig. Don't know what the outcome was.

 

Jim

Got to give that manager a bunch of credit. The industry needs more like that.

 

I had a salesperson tell me that my old truck (F350 dually) could pull a Mobile Suite 38rssb? (years ago) and that everyone in the dealership would swear to it. I said "NO WAY". We looked it up, and it, with no personal items, was over the cap of the truck. She was going off the "improved" ratings on the newer trucks (mine was 5 years old at the time)

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Unfortunately it will take a person getting into a personal accident before they see the light, the longer they get away with it the farther reality slips from their mind.

"what will it take to educate people about weights, speed and tires?

Rant off."

 

 

And perhaps MORE-SO educate Truck/Vehicle & RV sales people as to what it takes.

 

Some blame lies with Sales Persons to KNOW and to pass on that knowledge that the Tow Vehicle MUST be equal to the task of towing the RV. I am sure that SOME do, but apparently not enough. AND RVers need to learn before they buy, what it takes.

 

Perhaps this could be another "school" for ESCAPEES to undertake.

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I'm not sure I hold RV sales people responsible for the problem. Yes, I agree, that an honest dealer will give good advice on the matter. But, ultimately, there is personal responsibility for the buyer to know what he can safely tow. He's also the one who's responsible for knowing how to drive and tow. I do hold tow vehicle manufacturers responsible for their ratings.

 

Holding the dealer responsible for selling an appropriate RV is like blaming the grocery store for obesity.

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Out traveling this weekend, between Flagstaff and Kingman, AZ, I saw two cases where there was just not enough truck for the RV they were towing. If you are familiar with that piece of I40, you know that there are a few areas that have 6% grades that wind through canyons, with gusty winds.

One case was a Tacoma pickup pulling a 25' bumper hitch. Nose in the air, and he was on the edge of a catastrophic crash. And he had his family in the truck. The second case was a Ford Explorer doing the same thing. There were too many cases of people running the 75 mph on factory RV tires.

I know you and I can't do anything about it, but damn, what will it take to educate people about weights, speed and tires?

Rant off.

I agree. I went for truck cmape rto a 25 ft trtialer rcntly and wanted ot get rid of my dually & go smaller. i looked at 1/2 tons, but decided on another 1 ton, just to be safer. people who do 75 mph with tires rated for 65 max are asking for trouble. One thing I do intend to do is put Torklift stable loads on the new truck.

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I don't think it is the dealers responsibility to make sure your Tow Vehicle can pull what they sell you up to a point, but they should make it known the speed rating of the tires on what they sell you and that no matter what the tire looks like in 6-7 years they need to be changed. I just did not know for decades that they were only rated at 62 MPH and that if they looked good they still needed to be replaced. I knew of the European speed rating on car tires P, S and H were common 94, 112 and 130 MPH and you had to buy tires for the top speed of the car, but I never saw any speed rating on a trailer tire. I had a Porsche 911 and had to buy H rated tires, the dealers and tire shops would not sell me anything lower. I personally think to have a tire not rated at least 70-75 MPH in the states is wrong, that is the speed limit on most highways. Now should you tow at 72, probably not but many do and more why not make sure the tires can handle how many people use them and not end up causing possible injury or death?

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I was sitting in the campground just yesterday and in pulled a dodge caravan hauling a 24' bumper pull. He tried going up a hill in the driveway and no weight on the front tires and couldn't even go up the hill to park in his RV spot because he was spinning . That was followed by a person in a Dodge Dakota hauling a 30' older travel trailer. Frontend in the air also. Neither vehicle even had the hitch equalizer either. That was followed by another van hauling a 24' pontoon. None of these cars or trucks could see out there side view mirrors. How can people honestly believe that's safe?

 

One thing about the holiday weekends, they do have some great entertainment!

 

Dave

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California has a speed limit for all vehicles towing...including semis . That speed limit is 60 mph. Thats what the entire country as well as Canada should do and enforce it.

Actually, California's towing speed limit is 55. When pulling our toad, that's the limit. Rarely enforced, but if it is can be an expensive ticket. So I set cruise control at 62. Easier on me, the coach, and gas mileage.

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It is not just RVers that don't do their homework. We were sailors for almost 30 years. We were anchored with our 47' Catalina in the Channel Islands when a brand new 46' Hunter pulled in slowed down, literally started to anchor about 25' feet from us. I got in my dingy went over and asked what he was doing. I explained that because of the gusting wind I had out 200' of chain I would surely rotate into him. He explained he just picked up the boat from the dealer in Santa Barbara and it was his first sailboat! He was really a nice guy, but had no idea what he was doing. I went aboard, at this invitation, helped him anchor and spent the next 2 days trying to educate him about the danger he was in going out in a boat he new nothing about.

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I'm on my way back home and I'm in Santa Rosa, NM. Today I saw a F150 with a fiver setup and a dbl axle trailer. Once again, nose in the air and struggling for speed to get up the grade. A F350 smoked by me with a fiver, 80+. 10 miles down the road he was on the side of the road.

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It is not just RVers that don't do their homework. We were sailors for almost 30 years. We were anchored with our 47' Catalina in the Channel Islands when a brand new 46' Hunter pulled in slowed down, literally started to anchor about 25' feet from us. I got in my dingy went over and asked what he was doing. I explained that because of the gusting wind I had out 200' of chain I would surely rotate into him. He explained he just picked up the boat from the dealer in Santa Barbara and it was his first sailboat! He was really a nice guy, but had no idea what he was doing. I went aboard, at this invitation, helped him anchor and spent the next 2 days trying to educate him about the danger he was in going out in a boat he new nothing about.

 

Well, that's a Hunter buyer for ya...... (Just kidding, sort of.... C30, C250, C42MKI )

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