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Why a toad needs TPMS sensors


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If you pull a toad, you need to have TPMS sensors on its wheels.

 

We were following a semi that kicked a piece of steel up against the retaining wall in the construction site. Dale saw it fly up. The piece missed the truck and trailer but the toad wasn't lucky enough.

 

The alarm on the TPMS went off and we identified the right front tire of the toad was losing air. We made it to the shoulder with less than 10 psi on the reading.

 

We have a camera on the toad also. There was no change in the attitude of the toad as we stopped.

 

If we had relied on just the camera, the indication would have been when the toad rim started to destroy itself.

 

Even late model toads with built in TPMS need external sensors so the toad tire pressure can be monitored from the tow vehicle.

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In addition to not feeling that the toad is loosing air or has a flat, even though you have a monitor, you can't see the tires. We drug ours along for a long time before someone waving us over. The tire was gone along with parts of the car. That's when we got monitors for all the tires - motorhome and toad.

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I have our TPMS set up to monitor all tires on the MH , the Dolly, and the car. We tow a Prius on the Dolly. Have monitors on the rear tires on the Prius and the tires on the Dolly.

If I lost a tire on either the Dolly or the car I probably would not be able to tell it very well at the driver's seat even though we have a rear view camera, without the TPMS.

I highly recommend TPMS for all toads behind MHs. YMWV ;)

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Was thinking about installing a TPMS on our toad, as last year left rear tire on it blew out and eventually came off the wheel,but didn't feel a thing in our coach. :o

 

My concern is whether the signal emitted from the TPMS is strong enough to reach the monitor in driver's area of our coach. :unsure:

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Jim, I didn't go with the repeater that Mark mentioned. I went with the external antenna first. My antenna sits far enough back that it has no issues with reading all of the tires. I am not as long as Mark is but I am still 60ft.

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attachicon.gif20150511_081116.jpg

If you pull a toad, you need to have TPMS sensors on its wheels.

 

We were following a semi that kicked a piece of steel up against the retaining wall in the construction site. Dale saw it fly up. The piece missed the truck and trailer but the toad wasn't lucky enough.

 

The alarm on the TPMS went off and we identified the right front tire of the toad was losing air. We made it to the shoulder with less than 10 psi on the reading.

 

We have a camera on the toad also. There was no change in the attitude of the toad as we stopped.

 

If we had relied on just the camera, the indication would have been when the toad rim started to destroy itself.

 

Even late model toads with built in TPMS need external sensors so the toad tire pressure can be monitored from the tow vehicle.

WOW, that is some hole, how could you have 10 psi by the time you stopped with a hole like that?

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We bought a pretty inexpensive... okay, "cheap"... TPMS from Amazon that is basically a hand-held device about the size of a not-so-smart cell phone (think "Nokia" about ten years ago) and it sits in a cradle on the dash of our 36' DP and still gets the signals from the toad (a Jeep Wrangler 2-door) with no problems.

 

OEM TPMS units monitor the tire pressure as part of the stem itself; after-market sensors mount on the stem like a slightly over-sized cap. There should be no issues with interference between the installed TPMS and the after-market TPMS you'd need to monitor the toad's tires inside the coach.

 

WDR

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I used Pressure Pro since it was available. A couple of months ago I switched to TST on my trailer (PP still on the truck). I like the TST better. Nicer display, constant view of pressures without pushing buttons, smaller and easier to mount, works RELIABLY on long trailer. JMO.

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Let's see, tire pressure sensors, rear view cameras, ABS brakes, GPS, etc., makes me wonder how we ever traveled around the country years ago, and made it safely.

 

Point well taken, and same for auxiliary toad brakes before they were available on the market--, :rolleyes:

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Let's see, tire pressure sensors, rear view cameras, ABS brakes, GPS, etc., makes me wonder how we ever traveled around the country years ago, and made it safely.

All while sitting in the rear facing 3rd seat of a 1970 Ambassador station wagon crossing Texas in the summer....with no AC....

 

Pic of what can happen...

http://i.imgur.com/2eLFOOw.jpg

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Jack,

 

I have the 507 on the trailer (4 sensors + 2 extra) and the 510 (10 sensors) on the truck. Give me a year and I will have a valid comparison of the two models. I had the 510 on my trailer and traded six sensors + monitor in on the 507 when the batteries needed replacing. Really liked it. RandyA gave me a 510 monitor and some old sensors so with what I had left ended up with ten new 510 sensors for $200 on trade. Trying to get the sensors on my tandems was a royal pain. If I have any problems can see some Crossfires with dual schraders like Charlie's in my future.

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