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Another RV fire


Retiredin1993

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I'd sure like to know more about that tire starting the fire. I can't remember ever hearing of one like that as a tire usually takes a little time. Wonder if it might have been from a brake dragging first to start the entire thing by overheating?

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Another vote for a TPMS system for sure.

I would think that if the tire pressure were low enough to cause the tire to start on fire, you wouldnt need a TPMS to know the tire pressure was extremely low. I would think the "pull" on the steering wheel would be enough to let you know something was wrong.

 

Paul

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The dragging brake scenario is certainly a possibility. I wonder if a nearly pure nitrogen filled tire would have mitigated the fire risk somewhat, as it does in commercial aircraft tires.

 

I dont see how it could make much difference in either aircraft tires or motorhome tires, as they are both surrounded by air which is about 20% oxygen.

 

Paul

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I dont see how it could make much difference in either aircraft tires or motorhome tires, as they are both surrounded by air which is about 20% oxygen.

 

Paul

 

The FAA requires nitrogen or other inert gas fills for commercial aircraft (14 CFR Part 25, Amendment No. 25-78) specifically to minimize the risks of tire explosions when the gases from an overheated tire mix with oxygen at a concentration above 5%, reach the autoignition point. The fire ignites within the tire when enough oxygen is present, and the explosion spreads it. No fire, nothing to spread, even though the tire may still blow out due to overpressure and heat failure.

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I hope every one realizes that Oxygen is not explosive. If it were we would all blow up whenever we started a fire with a match or anything else. Oxygen allows a flammable object to burn better but you cannot ignite only oxygen.

 

Once a tire catches fire it is nearly impossible to extinguish without a huge chemical fire extinguisher or an extreme amount of water.

 

The fire was aided by the propane that vented from the tank. The tanks rarely explode unless there is a combination of fire and some sort of damage to the integrity of the tank. The Gasoline tank on the other hand is much more dangerous in my opinion. Again it won't be an explosion, more like a large flash of heat when the tank gives way to the heat. Unless a rubber line is melted and allows the gasoline to vent more slowly.

 

The first rule of passengers in a motor home is every one knows where and how to operate the emergency exit at the back of the coach and no one remains in the coach if there is any hint of a fire.

 

 

Rod

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I hope every one realizes that Oxygen is not explosive. If it were we would all blow up whenever we started a fire with a match or anything else. Oxygen allows a flammable object to burn better but you cannot ignite only oxygen.

 

Not going to argu the above point. But oxygen is highly combusive. Remember the Apollo 1 capsule fire? That was a pure oxygen atmosphere and, when combined with the electrical spark under the seats (ignition source), it created the flash fire that destroyed the interior of the capsule and killed the crew.

 

And one more vote for nitrogen in tires. Not only the FAA requires it, the US military uses nitrogen in their aircraft tires as well. It also may prevent rust or corrosion on the inside of your metal wheels.

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Yeah we saw that on the news today. Glad that RV repairman and trucker was there to help get them out the window.

 

This is a wake up call for emergency escape procedure drills for any RV if the door/s is/are blocked by fire. Regardless of your age or experience it is always good to review your emergency exits and try them to make sure you can get them open. Me, I'll take a broken ankle from dropping out over burning to death any day.

 

Safe Travels!

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The FAA requires nitrogen or other inert gas fills for commercial aircraft (14 CFR Part 25, Amendment No. 25-78) specifically to minimize the risks of tire explosions when the gases from an overheated tire mix with oxygen at a concentration above 5%, reach the autoignition point. The fire ignites within the tire when enough oxygen is present, and the explosion spreads it. No fire, nothing to spread, even though the tire may still blow out due to overpressure and heat failure.

 

 

Yep, an emergency air filled main or nose wheel means an r&r of the tire. If you've ever witnessed a wheel fire and explosion you would know why we use nitrogen. I've seen wheel explosions with and without a containment cage in place. The nitrogen generators we use create a 99.5% pure nitrogen.

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Unless I have forgotten some previous training the Oxygen itself is not combustable but when combined with many other substances,maybe any other substance in the proper concentration, is highly combustable and even explosive. Even the dust under your bed when matched in the proper concentrations will explode. Grain elevators are prone to explosion because of the proper concentration of grain dust and oxygen. The fire dept at NAS Dallas once put on a demonstration which included the house dust. I remember some training that talked about liquid ox through pilots face mask in too high a concentration of pure ox could cause burning due to the oil on their skin.

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One reason we like our motor home (without a bedroom slide) is the fact that it has large windows on each side of the rig in the bedroom that slide open (no louvers). Over 24" wide when open.

 

Long drop for two geezers but better than burning to death, for sure.

 

WDR

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The first thing we do when we take the 5th wheel out is show everyone where the emergency escape windows are located and how to open them and egress. They are easy to operate but in a state of panic it could become difficult. Now that I've seen this type of RV fire more than once I'm going to actually run a drill where my grand kids have to open the bunkhouse window(s) and climb out. You can never be to prepared.

 

James

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My TT has 2 doors which should make it easy but I have been concerned based on serious mobility issues at times in the past. That is something that concerns me about 5W and motorhomes depending on where you are located in the motorhome in relationship to the location of the fire. I think about Pam's issues and Bruce? for instance.

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Our coach has a driver's door and a midships entry door, plus an emergency access window in the rear bedroom. Two of the windows in the living area slide on the opposite wall from the door also open wide enough to be used as exits if needed. If someone is mobility impaired, hopefully there will be someone on the outside that can assist them escape through the closest available exit.

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Sure glad there was no one around with a video camera when I was trying to climb up on the dresser to get to the bedroom exit window in our previous Class A. Fire is a very good motivator, though. Glad I was just practicing but I sure would have moved faster if it was real.

 

Linda Sand

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Not going to argu the above point. But oxygen is highly combusive. Remember the Apollo 1 capsule fire? That was a pure oxygen atmosphere and, when combined with the electrical spark under the seats (ignition source), it created the flash fire that destroyed the interior of the capsule and killed the crew.

Oxygen it's self is not combustible, it's the other fuel sources it reacts with. In the case of the Apollo fire all of the wiring insulation and other plastic parts, seat foam and other similar parts were what burned because of the pure oxygen environment. In its liquid form it reacts with even more elements. An example of this is when they have LOX spill on asphalt. Nothing happens until the vapor barrier is disturbed by walking over the liquid layer which brings the LOX in contact with the asphalt causing a hypergolic reaction.

 

Having a full halon system in a coach would help but you would need an Air supply or you could pass out in a few seconds since it's an O2 depleted.

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