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Wheel torque spec needed


alan0043

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Hi Everyone,

 

I need to remove the wheel from my trailer for some maintenance work. I needed to know the torque spec to reinstall the lug nuts. The wheels are 16" aluminum. How many times to you re-torque the wheels ? After 100 mile or so, do you re-torque ?

 

Thanks for any help,

Al

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Al the torque will depend on the size of the stud. After I've had a wheel off I usually check at about 50 miles, then at the next stop. If the torque is correct at the second stop I don't check it again.

 

I do not know the size of the studs. The wheels are held on with 8 studs and lug nuts. I hope this helps.

 

Al

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They will probably be 9/16 studs.

With aluminum wheels torque to 110lbs. I do mine in 2 rounds, first to 100. then 110.

Drive 15 miles or so, RETORQUE

Drive another 50miles- RETORQUE

 

Then you should be good until the wheel is removed again. But every time we move, I check the lugs, stuff happens, kids play, people get jealous, whatever the reason.

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Not to be contrary, Jim, but the most common torque value that I'm familiar with for aluminum wheels on 9/16" lugs with tapered seat nuts is 140 ft/lb., not 110. You may be a tad light.

Quite ok,

I'm just going by the yellow tag on the fender well.

I'm not sure that a chinese aluminum rim could stand that much pressure at 140ft/lb though.... :ph34r:

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I'm not sure that a chinese aluminum rim could stand that much pressure at 140ft/lb though.... :ph34r:

 

My Chinese wheels have been handling the 140 ft/lb just fine since I upgraded to the 17.5s back in 2009, but now Ray's information calls the 140 ft/lb setting into question, too. Maybe I'm also a tad light.

 

On the other hand, I've always wondered what the true torque spec should be for the Hi-Spec wheels (mine didn't come with any documentation stipulating a lug nut torque spec for the new wheels, so I went with the 140 ft/lb that GM always stipulated for aluminum wheels on 9/16" studs with taper seat nuts) because they're aluminum, but they do have a (presumably stainless) steel insert into which the lug nut seats. Perhaps they require less torque than a bare aluminum seat would require.

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We recheck our torque before each trip as part of our pre-trip inspection. Prior to doing that, we lost a whole tire and wheel assembly along with 6 studs and lug nuts on trip and with a triple axle trailer we never noticed it till we got up the next morning after we got to our campsite late at night. Ours are torqued to 100 but we have the 1/2" studs.

Dave

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Dexter Axel specs the final torque on their 17.5" cone lug nuts at 190-210 ft pounds. This torque is reached in three stages. See their manual. Sorry I don't have an URL, this is from their published manual. The flange nuts are even higher.

 

I don't remember the spec for the 16" wheel and I don't have the manual handy just now. Will get the info tomorrow when I am back in my shop.

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Dexter Axel specs the final torque on their 17.5" cone lug nuts at 190-210 ft pounds. This torque is reached in three stages. See their manual. Sorry I don't have an URL, this is from their published manual. The flange nuts are even higher.

 

I don't remember the spec for the 16" wheel and I don't have the manual handy just now. Will get the info tomorrow when I am back in my shop.

This is only true is using Dexter's wheels produced prior to June 2004. Dexter no longer produces wheels and states " to contact the wheel manufacturer for the correct torque requirement"

The document further down states that the max torque for Dexter studs is 120 ft/lbs for 1/2", 170 ft/lbs for 9/16" and 325 ft/lbs for 5/8"

 

.

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