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another air question


chevy3500

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They use the same type of release that is used in most fittings today. You push in the outer ring around the tube. Even better, is go to your local auto parts and get a set of release tools ($5.00)

 

One of the things is the plastic tube cold creeps (moves with pressure) and over time also hardens. A new section of hose, splice, and your good. Or, if your really ambitious, replace it all the way.

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Thanks. Its not a very long hose maybe 18 inches, just goes around to other side of steering column if I remember, that end looks like a flare type fitting, again if I remember correctly. At work now so cant check. Are the fitting a common auto parts store item?

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You can buy the little collar tool and they do make it pretty easy. But until you have one, just take the smallest open end wrench that will get over the line and use that to push down the collar. It works well that way.

 

Rather than the air conditioner collars you might consider a tool set like THIS ONE, intended for the quick connects. I use these and they work well in tight places.

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So you just push in on the collar and pull the hose out?. Theres no pressure left on the line drained out pretty fast!

It's that easy.. Sometimes the collars can be recalcitrant.... But once they're retracted, the line cones right out.

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You can buy the little collar tool and they do make it pretty easy. But until you have one, just take the smallest open end wrench that will get over the line and use that to push down the collar. It works well that way.

 

Rather than the air conditioner collars you might consider a tool set like THIS ONE, intended for the quick connects. I use these and they work well in tight places.

They make a tool for that? I've always just use the open end wrench trick. Gee thanks Jack, now I gotta go buy another tool....just so I can "have" it :lol:

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It is like a Chinese handcuff. Slides in easily, the more pressure on it the more effective the seal. The wrench trick works ok except whenthe line has worn a grove from vibration. Then trim with a very sharp utility knife nice and square, no wire cutters. My beef is with the manufacturers who rarely leave enough to trim, and you have to splice something in, or replace a large section.

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It is like a Chinese handcuff. Slides in easily, the more pressure on it the more effective the seal. The wrench trick works ok except whenthe line has worn a grove from vibration. Then trim with a very sharp utility knife nice and square, no wire cutters. My beef is with the manufacturers who rarely leave enough to trim, and you have to splice something in, or replace a large section.

YES YES YES - not sure how they would but you should at least get a shot at one time trim

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Well got it off, just pushed it in with a small screwdriver. Trimmed a little off and put it back in. Still will leak a little if I wiggle it, but at least the air will build to normal pressure. I may have to try it again. Does the female part go bad? looks like there is probably an o-ring inside maybe?

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Still will leak a little if I wiggle it,

Well, then don't wiggle it silly :D

 

I know Brad Dadles tried trimming several of his leaking connections at last years rally and finally had to replace the fittings because they were worn out and not the tubing. You might just keep that in mind for those continual leaks.

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Well got it off, just pushed it in with a small screwdriver. Trimmed a little off and put it back in. Still will leak a little if I wiggle it, but at least the air will build to normal pressure. I may have to try it again. Does the female part go bad? looks like there is probably an o-ring inside maybe?

It is easy to just replace the worn parts in the fitting rather than the entire fitting, if you're frugal and don't want to spend the money on the fittings. Less threads to worry about leaking, too.

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It is easy to just replace the worn parts in the fitting rather than the entire fitting, if you're frugal and don't want to spend the money on the fittings. Less threads to worry about leaking, too.

Jay,

 

Are you saying the innards of a push in connector can be changed out? If so where do you get them and how do you do it? Thanks.

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KoFuBfFl.jpg

so when you say replace the fitting or parts are you talking the entire block that all those hoses go into or just the individual fitting for each hose? And how would you get those parts out?

Are those Kenworth specific parts or generic? Local Kenworth dealer doesn't seem real interested in relaying info. He's still trying to track down the bulbs for the dash and switch lights, and smart wheel control lights!

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Yes you can just replace the inner pieces!

Usually the o-rings are just dry rotted. Most times I will also change out the "basket" to make it as good as new. These brass fittings on our Volvos

cost more than their weight in gold. Usually the "fitting" is fine unless the threads are messed up.

Easy to pull the inner parts out using a pair of diagonal cutters and a small "pick". Then just push in the new o-ring and the basket and trim the air line and your good to go. Most of our trucks use the 1/4, 3/8, and 5/8 sizes of hose fittings. Here is the part # for the 3/8 o-ring

85108485. They are a "greenish" color. They usually come in a bag of ten. My local dealer usually stocks them. Haven't found them anyplace else yet. Still looking. I don't think these parts work on fittings that are "molded" into an Assy like the firewall pass thru in the above post or others like that. Most of those parts seem to have there own "rebuild" kits if available.

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Local Kenworth dealer doesn't seem real interested in relaying info. He's still trying to track down the bulbs for the dash and switch lights, and smart wheel control lights!

 

Hey, Chevy3500, on a hunch I looked in Quicken just now and found that I'd entered the bulb number into MS Money seven years ago, when I bought my first batch of bulbs and recorded the purchase. The bulb number is 2752, and may be available from a local parts store, or they're available here: http://www.amazon.com/CEC-Industries-2752MF-Bulbs-Plastic/dp/B00JZ8RNXU/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1426727488&sr=8-2-fkmr0&keywords=2752+miniature+light+bulbs

 

Get about two boxes of 2752 bulbs, a beverage of your choice, and a Phillips screwdriver, then have yourself a little re-lamping party in your T2000. It really won't take all that long, since everything comes out of the dash very easily. You'll see the bases of those little bulbs sticking out of the back of the A & B Panels and both switch banks.

 

You might want to see my last post on your original thread about the lights. You'll be ahead to pull the SmartWheel module off of the wheel to see if there's any provision for lights on your SmartWheel. On my 2003 it was NOT lit, so you may be leading the dealer on a wild goose chase. If your pads ARE lit, it's entirely possible that they, too, may use the little 2752 bulbs.

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Thanks Phil

I just ordered 2 boxes, I've got the dash pulled apart and have the burnt out bulbs out. Bases on mine were yellow, but after searching a few web sites I had come up with that same part number, was just wanting to confirm with the dealership. I also have the bulbs pulled out of the smart wheel, they're very similar in shape but a lot shorter than the dash lights (the end opposite of the lamp) they're also blue, and the lamp appears to have a blue rubberized coating on it. Dealer said the were NOT a replaceable part (bulb) and that I would have to replace the entire module that they were mounted in, but he had no idea if that was available anymore or the cost. It was no problem getting the module out of the steering wheelor the bulbs out of the module, same 1/4 turn set-up as the dash.

Thanks everyone for the help!

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