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My motorcycle lift


lappir

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https://plus.google.com/101351212510298499646/posts/f5SGSVTNgKL

 

 

 

I don't know if I posted earlier or not, but I think not. Know I haven't posted photos for sure. Anyway, the link above will take you to a few photos of a winch powered motorcycle lift. It's an older model of the Rampage lift designed for pickup's I believe. A friend has one on his Volvo and it works well with his Yamaha Cruiser. I happened on one here in South Florida this winter and made the purchase.

 

At some point I will be adding a side door to my truck box, just don't want to do it right now. Will be getting the box shortened and am thinking of using the floor that is cut off as a platform to load the motorcycle from the side and then slide the lift inside the truck for transport. I initially thought of adding a ramp door to the box that would be lowered over the hitch and the lift could be moved on small wheels inside a channel to the rear of the truck but using the bicycle it seems that a whole lot more steel would be required for such a contraption. Basically from the front of the box all the way past the hitch. Going sideways would be 1/3 the needed channel.

 

Thoughts, suggestions

 

Rod

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Rampage is a good solid lift set up.

Only thing you need to watch is the height when mounted on your HDT. They also make an extended one for HDT's with the higher frame height.

I used a pick up one, but with my bed, with the rear air dropped I just hit the max 35" ??? height at that time..

It worked fine, but did groan a bit when hitting the roll over point.

I always did get a chuckle though when they show them as "One Person" set up...yep, one person takes ~15 minutes, when two can do it in Five !!

Here is a picture of mine with my Brothers bike on in (not my Harley)

Cheers,

Bob

 

403701580.jpg

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I went with the longer version AND added a drop in the bed to mitigate the height issue. Don't have to drop air or worry about blocking up the ramp then. I do use a couple of 3/4 inch plywood strips under the wheels on soft ground, grass, and gravel as can be seen in the following pictures.

 

Has worked great for years with both:

 

The dresser---

 

Loading_dresser.JPG

 

And the softail ----

 

Loading_soft.JPG

 

 

Loading_soft1.JPG

 

Dave

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Nice set up Dave !! (and bikes too) :)

I made a set of 12 ga. flats about three feet long x 5" wide, with handles on the sides, to put under the back wheels, as I found out that they don't roll real well in grass of gravel..

Forgot to mention that...

Cheers,

Bob

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Thanks guys. Will remember the need for something for the rear wheels to ride on. I will need to replace most of the nylon rollers soon. Have you had to do that? Haven't started looking yet. Want to at least try it out with the old wheels and rollers first.

 

Rod.

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Thanks guys. Will remember the need for something for the rear wheels to ride on. I will need to replace most of the nylon rollers soon. Have you had to do that? Haven't started looking yet. Want to at least try it out with the old wheels and rollers first.

 

Rod.

Haven't had to replace any yet, but did do a little readjusting on them to make sure they roll freely. Before that I was thinking of replacing the winch cable with synthetic to keep it from tearing up the rollers because the plastic coating on the cable only made it about a year before I tore it up.

 

Dave

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Oh and there will be times when it takes up to a couple of hours to load because everyone in a five mile radius will have to come around and chat at you while you are trying to load. They usually start with "How do you work that thing".... :blink:

 

Dave

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Haven't had to replace any yet, but did do a little readjusting on them to make sure they roll freely. Before that I was thinking of replacing the winch cable with synthetic to keep it from tearing up the rollers because the plastic coating on the cable only made it about a year before I tore it up.

 

Dave

mine roll very freely but are pitted and quite rough along the rolling surface. Don't see any cracks but that's what would worry me the most. Having one split apart while loaded.

 

I have a 2 inch strap for the pull, no cable or rope. Not yet sure how long it is. Haven't run it all the way out yet. I know I need to keep at least one round around the drum for effective pull. Anything else I should know before I bolt it down somewhere?

 

Thank again for the replies. Have seen them used but never actually pushed the buttons or even tied a bike down on it yet.

 

Rod

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One critical caution.... When you load the bike take care that you do not tighten the straps to the cradle too much. As the cradle rolls over to it's latch point it will tighten the straps and start compressing the forks on the bike.

 

Many people at this point think the straps may still be too loose and tighten up more... CAUTION - :blink::wacko::unsure:

The forks WILL continue to compress as the cradle moves up the ramp, because as the bike front wheel moves up the ramp you are effectively dropping the rear.

 

You do not want to over compress the forks and blow a seal. Plus if the forks compress to the point they bottom out it can bend or break the arms on the cradle.

 

There is a knack to it.... Once the ramp reaches the tip point going up on the truck the rear of the bike is then raised again, this decompresses the forks some, possibly allowing the bike to tip sideways.

 

Dave

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Have same loader on my truck and like it. There is always things that could be better.

I still plan on changing the front wheel cradle to a wheel chock. Would feel more secure with front wheel trapped in a chock than held with straps. I would of course still tie down with straps!

Changing the wire rope to synthetic or strap will also be in the plan

Im not sure if my loader is the longer model, but larger wheels on the end of the track would be better. I have an idea to fab up something like lawn mower wheels that pin on when loading. Always have to carry planks for little wheels to run on.

I always stand beside when loading or unloading and hold on to end of ramp to soften the breakover.

After loading I tie handle bars down to angles that I had welded to front of frame of the Rampage, then tie back down to similar brackets on the back

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Good points.... There is an opening on the cradle on mine that a strap fits through so I do indeed use a short ratchet strap around the front wheel/rim to tie the wheel into the cradle before pulling the cradle up the ramp. <_<

 

I also wrap a strap around the lower part of the rear wheel and attach both ends out to the sides to make sure the rear of the bike cannot slip sideways on rough roads.

 

This gives me eight tie straps - Two on the front (NOT tied to the carrage arms for travel), two in center from frame, two at rear, and one at each wheel.

 

Dave

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I need to get me one of those!!! were is the best place to get these from? I have been wanting one for a couple of years now. Are they only mail order?

I will be at the HDT rally in Ten in April, Is there any place around there I can pick one up? other wise Michigan is just across the river for me.

Kevin

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I have wanted one for many years but could never afford a new one. Just happened on this one on a rare Craigslist morning review. It seems in very good shape but I haven't actually used it yet.

 

Will be heading to Bike Week on Saturday, over the years I have seen many a loader and if there are some there this year I will o pick up some info and post it here. I have thought about putting a front wheel chock in place of the cradle too. That is how my bike has traveled for thousands of miles over the last several years. I have one of the Harbor Freight simple chocks. Worked with my 1995 GL 1500 and works well with my Yamaha FJR 1300. I have started tying down the front wheel at the axle and doing no fork compression other than a pull forward from a frame connection. I do run a strap over the back end to prevent a bounce back there. Now that I carry the bike in the truck it get's a much smoother ride. My previous toyhauler would bounce the Goldwing around quite a bit as evidenced by the presence of road debris under the bike at the end of a long trip. Never came undone but did find it loose a couple times on a load check.

 

Thanks for the insight on the fork compression. I wouldn't have thought about it. Hopefully won't have to worry about it if I can still tie at the axle.

 

Rod

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I know 1Rod has a lift on hand already - but just for general interest - I have had the opportunity to use one of these with a Gold Wing: http://www.overbiltlifts.com/puloader.html

 

The motor assembly (right side in the images) engages a rack gear and travels with a solid mechanical connection. The one we used had a set of tie points extended from the chock as well for 2 soft straps to the triple clamp, then 2 rear tie back straps were attached from the bike to the truck bed after loading. Whole process didn't take 5 minutes to load with zero drama. Only the rear wheel of the bike rolls on the ground.

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Thanks for the insight on the fork compression. I wouldn't have thought about it. Hopefully won't have to worry about it if I can still tie at the axle.

 

Rod

Depends on when you are talking about tying at the axle... After the load no problem... During the load is a no - no. As the cradle rolls over it actually tightens the straps, the angle of the straps also changes as the rear of the bike drops as the cradle moves up the ramp causing further tightening. Both of these require fork compression, a hard tie WILL bend/break the tie down arms on the cradle or the straps.

 

After the loading process THEN the bike is tied at other points to steady it and the front ties are moved from the arms of the cradle to some other point. The arms of the cradle are not meant to be tie points during travel.

 

Loading and installation instructions--- http://motorcycletrailer.com/rampage/FULLMANUAL.htm

 

Dave

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Dave,

 

Thanks for the link for the instructions. I have looked for those before but hadn't found them. Bookmarked the page so hopefully I won't lose them. Wouldn't tie to axle until motorcycle is in it's transport position. Understand the mechanism of tightening with the view of the photos and video. Would like to have the steel wheels shown in the video, but imagine they might be pricey.

 

Rod

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