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To buy or not to buy....


Krlhrnss

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Hello! Hubby and I have our eyes on a 2008 Class C with over 100,000 miles on it. We paid to have it inspected last week and everything was in "excellent" shape. Today we ge the fluid testing back and it shows a "critical" results stating the fuel dilution exceed 5% (whatever that means). We were told by the lab consultant that several things could be the cause for this critical reading and some of them could trigger a false critical reading. Two of the things were a recent oil change and not letting the engine run long enough before taking the sample. After speaking to the inspector and the dealer I know that the oil was changed in the past month or so and the RV was only running 15 minutes before the sample was taken. It was a very cold day out as well.

I know very little about this. We are in love with this RV and don't want to walk away if it's something that can be dealt with through our extended warranty, but I also don't want to be in way over my head. The RV runs great now. If we get the 5- year extended warranty to cover the engine, would that be enough?!? I would love to hear the options of other, more experienced, RV owners.

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Gas or diesel, if 5% of the oil was fuel that is a lot. With fresh oil it is a bit worrying too as it is a fast leak not just fuel buildup from too much cold starting and short run cycles.

 

Might be a leaking injector which isn't cheap to fix, more if it is more than one leaking. You will have to read the warranty carefully to see if that is covered and if they cover pre-existing conditions or will expect you to pay for things wrong that pre-date the contract.

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I would not ignore a red flag like that as tempting as it might be. If you are still interested then have the motor checked out further. A garage should be able to check the fuel pressure and a compression check to verify the health of the motor. The fluid test was a smart move.

 

Greg

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First, welcome to the Escapee forums! We are always happy to have new folks join us and helping each other is what these forums are all about.

 

I am a strong believer in oil analysis and consider the information that they give to be of great importance. We used Blackstone Labs for our motorhome for a long time and that is the only report that I am very familiar with, but if this were my report from them, I would also be looking for other parts of the analysis that might indicate some information. I highly recommend that you take some time to read through this explanation of oil analysis indications to better understand what you are looking at.

 

There are several things that you need to consider in the decision on this purchase. The first part is to think about the reason that you had an analysis done. If you choose to ignore what that reports tells you, why bother to have one? Buying a used RV is a gamble and all that an inspection and oil analysis do is to improve your odds of getting a good one. It seems to me that you have allowed emotion to come into play in a choice that should be done based upon logic alone.

 

Before you can begin to assume that purchase of an extended warranty contract will protect you from a risk, you need to first get a copy of the contract to take home and read very carefully to be sure of exactly what is, and is not covered. It may be helpful to you in looking at the contracts if you take the time to read this article about "extended warranties." Be very careful of believing what a sales person tells you about this purchase, especially if the same dealer is selling the RV and the extended warranty. Remember that they make their living from the commissions on what they sell and that is the primary interest they have in the transaction.

 

No matter what the RV you are now looking at may be, with used RVs there is always another one somewhere that is as good or better and for as good a price. Never think that the one you now are looking at is the only good one for you. You might be surprised how often a person leaves a potential purchase disappointed, only to find a much better choice farther along.

 

None of us can tell you what you should do. But we can tell you what we would do in similar circumstances. If you buy this RV and get off on a trip when the engine fails, even if the extended warranty should pay the full cost of replacement, which is very unlikely, it still leaves you with no RV for your vacation or trip and with the cost of a place to stay, eating out, and travel home. As you may have guessed by now, if this were me I would decline to make that purchase and keep looking.

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I would not ignore a red flag like that as tempting as it might be. If you are still interested then have the motor checked out further. A garage should be able to check the fuel pressure and a compression check to verify the health of the motor. The fluid test was a smart move.

 

Greg

Ditto on the red flag!

 

If the engine has fuel injectors, the "O" rings, or the actual injector may be leaking fuel into the cylinders!!!

 

I would run the engine till it gets to operating temps. then turn it off. Then have someone check what the fuel pressure is, and see if it goes down to Zero over time. With 100K miles on the engine, I wouldn't be surprised... Although injector replacement is relatively easy, material cost and labor can run $1,500 and up!

 

AL

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You did the right thing by coming on the forum and sharing this. I am suspecting that you know it is a red flag and want to be convinced to do the right thing despite your emotional attachment to this MH. I have a few thoughts.....

 

1. I honestly dont think the test was done right . It was running too rich on a cold day with no proper run time and on too fresh of oil.

However , "critical" is indeed a red flag and I feel it needs more testing.

 

2. 100,000 miles on a 2008 is a little high for my liking for a motorhome.

 

3. You are getting too emotionally attached...you need to back off a bit and look around some more. There are plenty of good motorhomes on the market.

 

My 2 centavos....

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I will be buying a class A gas or diesel rig in Texas in the next month or two. Selling home, going full time. I had a Winnebago Minnie a few years ago and loved it.

I would like to find a good independent RV service place that could inspect a unit for me. Dallas and Houston is likely for the purchase. It would be great if anyone can refer me to a good "inspector" in one in those areas... I would appreciate it.

 

Question: what are the top 4 or 5 things to look for or test in this scenario ?

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Hmmmm, a 2008 with a 100,000 miles on it. I could be wrong but that sounds like it was a rental to me. Fuel in the oil is never a good thing. And as Kirk said, and with that oil analysis I'd pass. Don't be in a big hurry, it took us 1yr. to find the right used coach for us. There's always another right around the corner.

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I will be buying a class A gas or diesel rig in Texas in the next month or two. Selling home, going full time. I had a Winnebago Minnie a few years ago and loved it.

I would like to find a good independent RV service place that could inspect a unit for me. Dallas and Houston is likely for the purchase. It would be great if anyone can refer me to a good "inspector" in one in those areas... I would appreciate it.

 

Question: what are the top 4 or 5 things to look for or test in this scenario ?

First.......... Welcome to the Escapee Forums~!

 

There are several parts to this question so I'll try and address then individually. Gas or diesel is a significant issue by its self. The budget factor is usually the main issue which drives this one as the cost of diesels of similar quality & age will be 40% to 60% more than for gas. I suggest that you take the time to read through this discussion of that from a previous thread, then return with specific questions as you may have them.

 

For inspectors of a used RV prior to purchase, you can do a search of the internet or you can also check with the new inspection service called NRVIA which was begun by the folks at Workamper News magazine. Another approach would be to contact a mobile RV tech in the area where the subject RV is located. There is an excellent organization whose purpose is to assist RV buyers in finding a quality RV for a reasonable price called the RV Consumer Group, which you may find helpful. In addition, they supply a free, pre-purchase check list that you can download.

 

As to the top 4 or 5 things to check for, I don't think that I understand the question..... There are far more then 4 or 5 things that could potentially cause a used RV to be a bad choice. Any major problem in the running gear, unresolved leaks in the body, electrical problems, plumbing problems, and the list goes on and on. When I look at a used RV, it takes me at least an hour just to do a preliminary check to see if I'll consider buying it. Keep in mind that with every year older an RV is the greater the possibility is that an owner has abused or neglected it.

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LHS61....welcome to the forum. I like to inspect everything but I concentrate on the things that cost the most. Drive train is the most expensive, next is the roof and exterior, tires, plumbing. And then the appliances starting with the fridge.

 

- drive train ....get an oil anaysis as well as the transmission fluid anaysis. If it has an Allison transmission try to establish if it has Transdyne fluid in it ( a good thing) . Front end inspection by a good front end shop.

- roof..... depending on whether it is a fibreglass roof or EDPM check for seam condition and any evidence of tears or leaks.

- exterior ....check for delamination and clear coat pealing . Fading or cracking of vinyl decals. Does it have dual pane windows...also a good thing.

 

Some things can be checked by an RV inspector but I would not trust him to do all of it such as the drive train.....for that you need to take it to a good mechanical shop.

 

 

 

 

I also would concentrate on units that have been in Arizona their whole life. They are the most rust and corrosion free of all. I would pass on any unit that spent a large part of its life in the coastal states or anywhere that humidity is high.

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Keep in mind that nearly all extended warranty plans have a "pre-existing" clause in them that may well allow them to deny any claim you might submit.

I have not seen that in any of the contracts that I have read, but would be interested to see one which does. Can you point me to one such "extended warranty" which and a preexisting clause in their contract? That is a new twist that I've not seen yet and I have copies of several of them although far from all.

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I haven't seen one either but I'd thought they would be there.

 

If they aren't then I can see a really good reason to buy one. First, find an RV that has a blown engine and/or transmission and buy it. Next buy your extended warranty and wait a week. Submit your repair claims and have the warranty company pick up the repairs.

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I had no trouble finding entended warranty plans that contain this clause. The examples given were if you were to purchase a used rv and it had a known problem prior to signing a contract, then this condition would be excluded from that contract. Some examples were excessive rust, a bad generator/alternator, cracked wind shield, etc. In other words any problems that were known prior to would not be addressed by the contract. Just do a search on the words 'extended warrantiess for RV's" and you can take your pick of many threads.

 

In the real estate market this comes under " disclosers"

 

During my search, I did come across a site that had an excellent explanation of extended warranties and I would encourage all to read it if your considering this purchase. It's from one of our sister sites and very well written and with current information regarding todays market.

 

http://www.rv-dreams.com/rv-extended-warranties.html

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I had no trouble finding entended warranty plans that contain this clause. The examples given were if you were to purchase a used rv and it had a known problem prior to signing a contract, then this condition would be excluded from that contract. Some examples were excessive rust, a bad generator/alternator, cracked wind shield, etc. In other words any problems that were known prior to would not be addressed by the contract.

Now that part I would agree is in pretty much all of them, with the possible exception of some that are sold by RV dealers and only on new purchases. There is a "prior damage" clause on all that I am familiar with, but I have not seen any with ""pre-existing" clause in them that may well allow them to deny any claim you might submit." I have read a lot of complaints about those contracts but I can't remember ever hearing of that one. An interesting thing which I have found in my research is that the share of customers who are not happy with the service received from their extended warranty tends to increase as the price falls and to decrease as it rises. They tend to work exactly like health care policies in that the less you pay for them the more that will be excluded from coverage and the more difficult it will be to get a claim approved. While price alone is never a good indication of quality, these contracts are no different than shopping for an RV or for most other things in that the the lowest price is seldom the product that gives you the most for your money.

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Here's another example - http://www.easycare.com/extended-warranties/what-is-not-covered/

 

In my world, the terms "pre-existing damage" and "prior damge" are synominous with one another. This same clause is addressed in item #6 of the Rv-Dreams article.

 

Now, I agree that without a contract in hand, the details are not specific, but I for one do not require personal contact with one of these salesman. Your on your own for that.

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I am with others, Kirk mostly, unless it is a diesel with over 100,000 miles is high on a gas rig, I know some will run gas rigs will run 2-3 times that and it is better to run than let one sit but a motorhome is under full load all the time and over 100000 miles that new could mean it was a rental unit, and major motor or transmission overhaul before long with the red flag already showing

and without a second oil test done right and with good results I would also pass, I would pass anyway, but that's just me, when buying used I like more in the 40k to 55k miles, I figure that leaves me at least 50k miles before much trouble.

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