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tires and altitude


Tex Bigfoot

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The thread regarding sleep number mattress and the need to lower the air when crossing a pass got me to thinking .

Has anyone ever had a problem with tires over pressurizing when at altitude?

 

Years ago we would have never even known that the pressure had risen but now with the TMPS that are widely used you would at least know that PSI was higher than normal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I have noticed that the tire pressure will go up some at higher altitude, but it has never gotten near as high as it will driving at highway speeds when the air temps are above 90F. So I have never adjusted it, I guess if I was spending all my time at a high altitude, I would consider adjusting the pressure, but not for just going up and over. Here is a discussion about the effect of altitude on tire pressure.

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I know altitude and possible temprature change to a lesser extent has caused some items in the kitchen to leak or siphon out if it is in one of the plastic container that nowadays most come in. Like mustard, ketchup, or the latest was some cooking oil in the cabinett.

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Take a bag of potato chips from low elevation to high and see what it does. Too high and .... POP! However, I never had an issue with tire pressure. Living at ~7000' I have never really had to adjust either going lower (Texas) or higher (off roading at 13000'+). As long as tires are regularly checked and are inflated properly to cold inflation recommendations you should not have any issues. Tires are designed to accommodate a range of pressures while operating (both elevation and heat).

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One must also consider the size or volume of air something has. Something like a mattress has a lot of air and not really a big issue UNLESS you already have it maxed out a lower altitude. A bike tire has a lot less volume and the pressure raises a lot when going up!!!! Ask me how I know!!!! :o

Just sayin'

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One must also consider the size or volume of air something has. Something like a mattress has a lot of air and not really a big issue UNLESS you already have it maxed out a lower altitude. A bike tire has a lot less volume and the pressure raises a lot when going up!!!! Ask me how I know!!!! :o

Just sayin'

While I was thinking of trailer or truck tires.

 

You bring up a point that I most likely do need to keep in mind as I tend to run my bike tires at or near max.

 

Thank you for that

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Yep.......I maxed out all the tires, truck, trailer, spares, and the bikes. Went from sealevel to over 7K ft........boy was that costly!!! Tires and tubes on the bikes. The tires were older and they broke out the cords near the bead of the tire. That's enough talk of my stupidity for today!!!!

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If you are really concerned about it, check it out on the engineering toolbox website. Stanley is right on and the change is not enough to amount to anything significant for tires on an RV. It might effect tires on a swamp buggy or something and could make a significant change in your mattress, but not enough to be likely to harm it.

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Kirk that is a great website.

 

Having crossed the Rocky's many times on a truck I knew that truck and trailer tires are ok the bike tires is something I will keep in mind . My main concern was that with a TPMS I would notice for the first time the different in PSI and do something dumb ...like air down. I was also wondering if while at altitude for a month or so I should air down some.

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Take a bag of potato chips from low elevation to high and see what it does. Too high and .... POP! However, I never had an issue with tire pressure. Living at ~7000' I have never really had to adjust either going lower (Texas) or higher (off roading at 13000'+). As long as tires are regularly checked and are inflated properly to cold inflation recommendations you should not have any issues. Tires are designed to accommodate a range of pressures while operating (both elevation and heat).

Hah, we did that in 1998 (I think). Left IN, drove I70 W, through the tunnel, stopped near the summit. Opened 5er to find the interior littered with potato-chip.s Anyway, air pressure change with altitude and temperature. shows the change is insignificant unless we are running the minimum tire pressure (per load/inflation charts) now, or plan on reaching 20,000' or higher.

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The fancy new condiment containers that open from the bottom can also be a real surprise. A bit of altitude and you get splattered when you open them, a lot of altitude and they can open themselves and redecorate the fridge.

 

We put turning all of them spout up on our pre-trip checklist.

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The fancy new condiment containers that open from the bottom can also be a real surprise. A bit of altitude and you get splattered when you open them, a lot of altitude and they can open themselves and redecorate the fridge.

 

We put turning all of them spout up on our pre-trip checklist.

Been there, done that_ ;) Didn't even have to climb a mountain, just sat it on the counter from the frig., opened it about an hour later and SPLAT!

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