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Tips Needed for New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island


Solo18

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I am headed to New England and the Maritimes this fall. Will be in New Brunswick last week of August and then in the other two provinces (Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island) in September and maybe a bit of October. I was thinking of taking a quick trip to Newfoundland, but discovered the ferry charges $295 Canadian for my size vehicle!

 

Other than the usual Anne of Green Gables stuff in Prince Edward Island, I am really not sure where to go or what to do. I like nature things and museums. I would also like campground suggestions, preferably places where I can get free WiFi and are open for satellite. (I need WiFi because I am still working part time and need to be online at least once per day.)

 

Tentatively, I have eight days planned for each of the three provinces.

 

Thanks

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Not sure which ones you mean by the other two provinces, but..... some nature things for you at least.

 

New Brunswick, Fundy National Park, its gateway town is Alma. We stayed inside the park, at the Chignecto North campground. It was lovely, smelled like Christmas trees.

 

Nova Scotia, Kejimkujik National Park. Annapolis River Campground in the very tiny town of Bridgetown. There is a nice farmers market in Annapolis Royal, as well as a nice local garden.

 

Cape Breten Island, Cape Breten Highlands National Park. Alexander Graham Bell Historical Site is in Baddeck, very cool. North Sydney/Cabot Trail KOA, New Harris.

 

Canada has a pass that is similar to our Federal Access Pass, the Parks Canada Pass. We found it to be a good value and would buy one again. We bought it at Fundy, which happened to be the first place we needed it. As for wi-fi, we were most favorably impressed with it in almost every location we stayed in our three month visit, so much faster than in the US as a rule.

 

Donna

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We did a day trip to PEI with the car on the ferry - saw all we wanted, had a great day, and a great trip over and back.

 

Bay of Fundy was fun, but we only spent a couple of days there. Nova Scotia is where we spent all of our time. Love Cape Braeton - great geocaching. The library in Baddeck has free ethernet connection for a donation - really a great way to catch up on things and upload photos for blogs, etc. In fact, most of the libraries are connected and you can get online for a donation. Alexander Graham Bell site is a great place for a rainy day - - was so much more than we expected. Make sure you see the Tidal Bore in Truro and that you spend time in the Peggy's Cove area - what a beautiful place. And downtown Halifax is great - the Maritime Museum is very good and they had a concert in the Park the Sunday we were there.

 

Lots and lots of things in Nova Scotia to see and do.

 

Barb

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You need to visit "Flowerpot Rocks/Hopewell Rocks" on the coast of New Brunswick. St. John is worth at least a day if not two. We spent four days on Prince Edward Island and could easily have spent much more time there. Nova Scotia is probably the most scenic of the lower provinces. Halifax is a beautiful city with much to do and see. Don't miss the Maritime Museum and not far away is Victoria Park.

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We loved our trip to Newfoundland and Labrador. Don't go unless you are willing to spend at least 3 weeks and 6-7 weeks for a leisurely trip is much better. We spent 7 weeks in NL, taking the long ferry ride to the eastern side of the island and working our way back to the short ferry. We included taking our RV on the ferry to Labrador for a week as well.

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Didn't realize Cape Breton became a separate province recently... :) The other two provinces that he is referring to is just NB and NS. Nfld is part of Atlantic Canada but not part of the Maritimes.

 

In PEI - Twin Shores is our fav .. I know about wifi but unsure about satellite... probably the only RV site that is growing..HDTs are no problem..dog friendly...they are allow on the beaches there...stuff sold on site is comparable to the prices of what you get in town ..plus there are a bunch of farm vendors along the road.....

 

NS is large...no easy to camp in one place and tour.. where I live is becoming the "napa valley" of Canada...so if you like wine.. If you have a large rig, I don't think the Ovens can accommodate you in the first row by the sea .. but it is a small location so it doesn't put you at a disadvantage..

 

I would really make sure I ordered the free Dooers and Dreamers guide for NS and the equivalent for PEI and NB..they are packed with info..

 

And..the weather should be great...

 

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We did a day trip to PEI with the car on the ferry - saw all we wanted, had a great day, and a great trip over and back.

 

 

 

With all due respect, having spent 6 weeks on PEI last summer with the intention of returning again this year, if you only day-tripped to the island you missed an awful lot. PEI is a delightful escape from the hustle and bustle of the rest of the world. Yes, there is the "touristy" side of the island with the Anne of Green Gables stuff and, if you enjoy tourists taking pictures of themselves in front of a house that actually has nothing to do with the book, that may interest you. But PEI is much more than that.

 

If you plan on spending a few days on the island, I recommend you go to Summerside and attend a concert at the College of Piping and Celtic Performing Arts. You've never heard bagpipes until you've heard them doing things like accompanying a John Lennon song. A day in the Acadian area of the island is also worthwhile as is a trip to the northwestern tip and a visit to the excellent wind energy exhibit there.

 

Almost any evening you can attend a ceilidh (pronounced "kay lee") which is an informal concert given in church halls, community centers, etc. They don't cost more than a few dollars at most and they give you a real sense of the people of PEI.

 

We found lots to do in our 6 weeks if you really like getting to know a place. There are numerous festivals each month as well as local theater, etc. The people of the island are outgoing and friendly. We truly loved it. If you have any questions feel free to PM me.

 

Joel

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Another thing to be sure and experience on PEI is the "lobster suppers!" But plan ahead and go very hungry. :P

 

The "lobster supper" restaurants are something the tourists do enjoy. But if you really want a good, fresh lobster they are available all over the island (and Nova Scotia) for a lot less money. Both lobsters and mussels are readily available at rather low prices (and the Canadian dollar is worth even less relative to the US$ this year) and learning to cooking is a easily acquired skill.

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The "lobster supper" restaurants are something the tourists do enjoy.

Restaurants? We attended several and all of them were community fund raisers. One was for the local volunteer fire department, another was being held by a church and the last was a fundraiser for a charitable organization, whose name we can't recall. Restaurants do sell lobster dinners too, but I never heard them called lobster suppers. Our favorite one was the one by the fire department..

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Joel,

 

Notice that I said one day was enough for what we wanted to see. We went in 2008 when fuel was sky high. Since it was over $6/gallon for diesel, we had to be a little on the frugal side and the cost of taking the MH + car over (whether ferry or bridge) was more than we wanted to spend when we could use that money to spend on more time in Nova Scotia and all of the different things we wanted to see. We geocached over quite a bit of PEI, visited a winery, saw the place where the first reports of the Titanic reached North America, etc. It was a great way to get a glimpse of PEI while still saving some money so we could enjoy a week at Peggy's Cove and Halifax.

 

Barb

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Restaurants? We attended several and all of them were community fund raisers. One was for the local volunteer fire department, another was being held by a church and the last was a fundraiser for a charitable organization, whose name we can't recall. Restaurants do sell lobster dinners too, but I never heard them called lobster suppers. Our favorite one was the one by the fire department..

 

There are a number of well known "lobster supper" restaurants on PEI and also in Nova Scotia. They are popular with tourists and get lots of the "bus tour" crowd. Typically, last summer they were charging ~$30 for a dinner consisting of a ~1 pound lobster some mussels and all you can eat sides of potatoes, etc. Those kinds of places don't appeal to us.

 

With lobsters selling for $5/lb direct from fisherman (and ~$7 in fish markets) and mussels at 5 lbs for $8 we were able to enjoy them several times a week interspersed with fresh haddock and halibut and our total costs were little more than the cost of these mass-produced dinners.

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I live in NS but am from PEI...but I left in '81...yes..we have official lobster suppers...Rustico (the creek), New Glasgow, and St. Ann's are probably the best known...

 

The op is correct..church suppers are excellent...

 

You first impression is that the island is the neatest / cleanest place in the world...all houses..regardless of size have their lawns cut and have flowers out..

 

Don't forget the Confederation Center of the Arts...and book early..they put on world call productions..

 

Pets are not allowed on the provincial / federal run beaches..

 

The Island is a lot bigger than it looks on paper...we have had tourists take the boat over (leaving their cars in NB / NS) an expect to walk everywhere.. unless you have a need to be on a ferry, the bridge is a much better choice and if you arr coming up from Maine, you can exit via NB vs having to travel into NS for pick up.With the bridge, came day trips which has been a bit of a shock to their culture.

 

Call for the free guides...

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Joel,

 

Notice that I said one day was enough for what we wanted to see. We went in 2008 when fuel was sky high. Since it was over $6/gallon for diesel, we had to be a little on the frugal side and the cost of taking the MH + car over (whether ferry or bridge) was more than we wanted to spend when we could use that money to spend on more time in Nova Scotia and all of the different things we wanted to see. We geocached over quite a bit of PEI, visited a winery, saw the place where the first reports of the Titanic reached North America, etc. It was a great way to get a glimpse of PEI while still saving some money so we could enjoy a week at Peggy's Cove and Halifax.

 

Barb

 

Barb:

 

I do strongly urge you give PEI a second chance. We totally fell in love with it. Very few people (as long as you stay away from Green Gables), beautiful rolling countryside dotted with well cared for cottages each with a neat little garden just as yzg notes in his post. The fastest speed limit on PEI is 90 km/hr (54 mph) and that's only on highways 1, 2 and 3. All the other roads are limited to 80 km/hr (48mph) and it's quite pleasant to drive at these relaxing speeds with virtually no traffic around you.

 

Fuel (both gas and diesel) were ~$4.75 gal last summer but the island is small enough that we were able to explore lots of it without moving the MH (this summer the effective fuel cost including exchange rate will be ~$3.50). We stayed at two different parks over the 7 weeks we were there. As for the costs of getting there, the toll is paid when you leave regardless of whether or not that is the ferry or the bridge, and it doesn't matter which one you took to get there. The bridge is the bargain because a car costs $45 but it only cost $60 for the MH plus toad.

 

We spent the majority of our time at a family-run CG on the far eastern side of the island. Most of our neighbors were locals who used the park as a seasonal get-away. Through them we were introduced to the culture of PEI by being invited to local plays, ceilidhs, etc. We even received "gifts" of vegetables from people's gardens! A truly charming place.

 

Joel

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As you make your plans you may want to consider checking if the Tattoo is going on. Not certain of the time or location. We want to go again when we get back that way again. The whole summer in 2006 was spent in the Maritimes area. Enjoy your trip and take your time to enjoy.

 

Safe Travels!

 

Tattoo is staged in Halifax during the first two weeks of July. It is an impressive pageant if you happen to be there during that period.

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The "lobster supper" restaurants are something the tourists do enjoy. But if you really want a good, fresh lobster they are available all over the island (and Nova Scotia) for a lot less money. Both lobsters and mussels are readily available at rather low prices (and the Canadian dollar is worth even less relative to the US$ this year) and learning to cooking is a easily acquired skill.

Yep, boil your own lobster. It's easy to boil water, then drop in your lobster. It's done when the "whiskers" pull off easily, or around 20 minutes. Mussels open up when done, if it comes out of its shell by itself, it;s bad to eat. When you must use your fork to remove it, it's good.

The thing I didn't like about the lobster "suppers" was, their normal way of serving lobster seems to be_ room temp.

The only place I ate a lobster cooked by someone else was near Granbury Ferry. We parked at a CG on the bay of Fundy, walked 1/4 mile to a lobster clearing house where they bought, sorted by size, and shipped to customers. There you select your lobster, they boil it while you wait, then put it in a plastic bag to take home and eat. Now that one was great!

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Tattoo is staged in Halifax during the first two weeks of July. It is an impressive pageant if you happen to be there during that period.

I agree! Last summer the RCMP gave a tribute to the murdered/ambushed mounties that summer. I don't know who, or how many were in tears, I couldn't see through mine.

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